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  • Feeling the Space
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Feeling the Space Original recording reissued, Original recording remastered


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Audio CD, Original recording reissued, Original recording remastered, July 22, 1997
$49.56 $21.39

Mumford and Sons Concert Sweepstakes Mumford and Sons Concert Sweepstakes


Product Details

  • Audio CD (July 22, 1997)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Original recording reissued, Original recording remastered
  • Label: Rykodisc
  • ASIN: B0000009RK
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #257,992 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Growing Pain
2. Yellow Girl (Stand By For Life)
3. Coffin Car
4. Woman Of Salem
5. Run, Run, Run
6. If Only
7. A Thousand Times Yes
8. Straight Talk
9. Angry Young Woman
10. She Hits Back
11. Woman Power
12. Men, Men, Men
13. I Learned To Stutter/Coffin Car
14. Mildred, Mildred

Editorial Reviews

Product Description

This CD is an out of print collectible! It is the original 1997 release. Still sealed.

From the Label

Woman: her power and powerlessness, her joy, her sadness, her light and darkness - all the ways she goes about FEELING THE SPACE are given shape by Yoko within the twelve songs of this album. Backing her are a supergroup of session musicians who allow the songs to breath without the usual rock and roll orchestrations.

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 14, 1999
Format: Audio CD
More so than any of their previous collaborations or dual releases, "Feeling The Space" could stand along with John's "Mind Games" (released the same year) as two halves of the whole. Here, Yoko shows she was paying attention to John's world, even while he was learning from her. This is the debut of Yoko Ono, pop songwriter. A great, great album from a woman who will always be under an unfair burden. While sadly her next great album would be "Season Of Glass", then the brilliant "Onobox", this is Yoko writing about difficult issues, but in a musically positive mood, with many clever melodic tricks obviously filtered through from her husband. This album (and Onobox), leaves you wishing she had done more in this vein.
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful By DDuke50264@aol.com on May 15, 1999
Format: Audio CD
I treasured this record for years and now finally have it on CD. I love almost every song - especially Mildred, Mildred recorded at an impromptu session with John Lennon during the Bank Street period. Women Power is a classic as well as well Women of Salem. Wonderful and highly recommended!
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Keri on November 1, 2001
Format: Audio CD
First best is the album Yoko did right before this Approximately Infinite Universe. You want a picture of what the world was really like for women in the early-mid 1970's listen to Yoko.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By NDB on November 4, 2009
Format: Audio CD
Yoko Ono is an artist in her own right. Her relationship with John Lennon is a huge part of her art/music, but not the element she should be judged against. She pushed boundaries, played with sound, noise, different aspects of expression. She was an innovator. Her music opened the door to punk and post-punk and new wave, without ever sounding like anything else. Listen to it without succumbing the tired old (codger) bias about how she screwed up the Beatles. For real, people. Some of these reviewers offer nothing enlightening about the music, good or critical. Just more boring ideology. People must have a lot of time on their hands in order to simply express their dumb, and frankly annoying, small-minded outrage about Yoko Ono.
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Format: Audio CD
Finding herself increasingly romantically withdrawn from the all too close relationship she shared with John Lennon,it would seem to me that the pair were finding themselves still peripherally involved in the others life while on very different life paths. To hear Yoko tell it? Her musical/art career began to regain serious power during the mid 1970's,while John's lifelong emotional insecurities got the best of him during his self named "lost weekend". Yoko found herself as an empowered woman on a serious mission. And with access to an all star band of musicians such as David Spinozza and Michael Brecker? She was able to continue realizing her vision.

Songs such as the flute powered "Growing Pain","Run Run Run" and "Angry Young Woman" are soulful,electric piano led ballads while "Yellow Girl (Stand By For Life)" and "Man Man Man" both have stomping,swinging cabaret jazzy blues rhythmic flavors about them.
"Coffin Car" has a grinding blues/rock vibe that is repeated on the cooler "She Hits Back" while "If Only" is a harmonica led country/blues type ballad. "A Thousand Times Yes" is a rhythmically clean jazz-funk number not too far from something the Crusaders might've done at this time while "Straight Talk" updates the rock 'n soul shuffle of "Instant Karma" from her viewpoint. "Woman Power" is a stomping,percussive funk rocker with a rapped vocal from Yoko.

"I Learn To Stutter" is a live spoken intro to a verision of "Coffin Car" where Yoko talks of how the press attack that accompanied her marriage to Lennon deeply effected her emotionally. "Mildred Mildred" is a swinging nightclub friendly piano ballad.
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6 of 9 people found the following review helpful By yokoboy@hotmail.com on February 5, 1999
Format: Audio CD
This album, the last of the Yoko Ono/Plastic Ono Band period, is quite a different step from the direction Yoko had been heading with previous recordings. On this, her 4th solo LP, Yoko opted for a smoother, more jazzier style than the pre-alternative rock she had been venturing into on "Fly" and "AIU".
Here we find an album about women, for women and by a woman. Most songs deal with the stress and strain of women trying to survive in a male-dominated society, however you don't have to be a woman to enjoy this album. Songs like "Angry Young Woman", "She Hits Back", and the album's single "Woman Power" could have easily been anthems for the feminist movement. Others like "Yellow Girl", "Coffin Car", and "Woman of Salem" depict the damage done to woman by the ongoing oppression of the male society.
This album also features many other fine moments. The song "Run, Run, Run", a single in Europe and Japan, deals with drug addiction and a world passing you by without your knowledge. The key lyric of the song, "Feeling the room, Feeling the space, when suddenly I noticed it wasn't spring anymore", is quite a reality check in itself.
The highlight of the album though is it's closing track, a song titled "Men Men Men". Here Yoko turns the tables on men by depicting what she seeks in a man and not the other way around as was custom at the time. Yoko gives a hats off to Mae West in the songs final refrains when she breathfully beckons "Come up and hmm-hmm, come up and see me sometime." In probably one of the most clever lyrics of the time,Yoko announces "Ladies and Gents, I'd like to introduce you to...
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