Fever Dream (Pendergast series Book 10) and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy Used
$14.95
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: 12 CD's. Cover box has minimum shelf wear.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Fever Dream Audio CD – Audiobook, Unabridged


See all 28 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Audio CD, Audiobook, Unabridged
$3.99 $3.39
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
$5.00
12%20Days%20of%20Deals%20in%20Books
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Year
Best Books of 2014
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2014's Best Books of the Year in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.

Product Details

  • Audio CD
  • Publisher: Grand Central Publishing; Unabridged edition (May 11, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1607881942
  • ISBN-13: 978-1607881940
  • Product Dimensions: 5.2 x 2 x 5.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (437 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #677,642 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Rene Auberjonois continues his skilled narration of Preston and Child's suspense series featuring FBI Special Agent Aloysius Pendergast. Twelve years ago, Pendergast's beloved wife, Helen, was killed by a lion in Africa, and her bizarre death still haunts him, but now he's discovered something extraordinary. Helen's death was no freakish accident, it was murder. Accompanied by his good friend, NYPD detective Vincent D'Agosta, Pendergast travels halfway around the world to investigate his wife's killing. Auberjonois perfectly captures the mysterious and suspenseful tone of the authors' story. His character portrayals are spot on as he slips from one diverse set of characters to another. This particular adventure provides him with a stronger emotional range in regard to the usually unflappable Pendergast who is more passionate and impulsive than we've seen in the past, and Auberjonois embraces this opportunity to show a deeper, more human side of the agent. A Grand Central hardcover (Reviews, Mar. 8).
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Review

"René Auberjonois...lends the proper air of gravitas to his performance. With the underlying story featuring zombies and the undead, it takes the sober Auberjonois to help maintain the credibility of the plot. His sincere delivery is perfect for a strange story that is more than a little creepy."—AudioFile Magazine on CEMETERY DANCE

"[A] suspenseful tale of urban terror...this taut page-turner can only add to the authors' growing fan base."—Publishers Weekly on CEMETERY DANCE

"Narrator As Pendergast discovers that his beloved wife kept a myriad of secrets, Auberjonois's characterization dramatizes the special agent's confusion over his wife's loyalty."—AudioFile

More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

Maui H.S. This is one of Preston and Child's best Pendergast novels.
Red Rose
My only complaint is the ending seemed rushed and maybe a little confusing, just felt it came to an end too quickly.
raven
There were many twists and turns along the way, and they all kept me guessing until the very end of the story.
Blaine Greenfield

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

225 of 236 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on May 11, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
After pre-ordering the book on kindle, I read the book in one sitting. I must say that Preston-Child are showing some love back to Prendergast series after the last couple of mis-haps ( yes, wheel of darkness quite ruined the series for me ). This book gets basic elements right and tells a compelling story set in the heart of American south.

In my humble opinion, there are three sets of Pendergast series. The first three belong to the great series, namely, Relic, Reliquary and Cabinet of curiosities. The second set is the "Diogenes" series ( Brimstone, Dance of death and Book of the dead ), which are quite good reads, but could get repetitive. The third set is purely commercial breaks between solo projects of each authors ( Still life..,Wheel of darkness and recent Cemetery dance ).

This book signals the return to form for the authors. Recurring characters are kept to a minimum and story is fast paced with thriller elements. Sherlockian style is quite visible here more than any other novels. Also the books seems to leave quite loose ends of the story for continuation in another book, but is not quite unwelcome. We would love another great story by the authors.

One nagging doubt for me is if the authors are getting themselves into a corner with Pendergast. Since the last 4-5 books dealt with similar theme around Pendergast's family, the series is getting quite contrite. A change of scenery may be good. Also, the pre-climax action sequence of the book is vaguely familiar to a recent book by one of the authors and if you were reading them back to back, similarities are hard to mess ( leverage the research, is not a bad idea, but might have been too soon ! ).

In summary, Fever Dream is quite worth the wait and signals a renewed comeback for our favorite FBI agent and loyal lieutenant. Go for it !
8 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
86 of 93 people found the following review helpful By TMStyles VINE VOICE on May 15, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
"Fever Dream" is the 10th suspense thriller from Preston and Child built around Special Agent Aloysius Pendergast. Trust me when I say it is a return to form for the authors and for our favorite enigmatic Holmesian sleuth. This series was great from its inception with "Relic", "Reliquary" and "Cabinet Of Curiosities" until it began to slide into complacency, supernaturalness, and predictability. Even worse was the seeming decline of Pendergast's intuitive skills compunded by his sometimes long absences from subsequent books while his NYPD ally, Lt. Vincent D'Agosta, carried much of the load.

"Fever Dream" remarkably returns all focus on Agent Pendergast, fine tunes his logical, eccentric, and brilliant crime solving talent, and makes him more human and emotional than ever before in the series. Twelve years earlier, Pendergast and his wife, Helen Esterhazy Pendergast, had been hunting in Zambia, Africa when she was tragically devoured by a ferocious man-eating lion. A chance discovery 12 years later leads Pendergast to the certainty that his wife was murdered by an elaborately staged accident.

He enlists the aid of his old friend, Lt. Vinnie D'Agosta, to assist him in following the cold trail in an effort to find Helen's murderers. Of course, this time the investigation is personal and Pendergast reveals his emotional side as he fights to control his anger and his baser instincts for abject vengeance. He is also forced to rely more on his allies for assistance and perspective because some of his cool resolve has, understandably, melted. Captain Hayward, D'Agosta's love, also joins the hunt as the level of violence and suspense ratchets up several notches.

Pendergast has to reexamine all that he knew--and did not know---about his wife in order to make headway.
Read more ›
4 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
60 of 66 people found the following review helpful By kacunnin TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on June 22, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Fever Dream is fast-paced, fairly entertaining, and will satisfy most of the avid Pendergast fans out there longing for their Aloysius fix. At the same time, it's not a very good novel. Let me be clear - I have enjoyed the Preston/Child novels, to various degrees, since Relic, and I am as intrigued by the enigmatic Special Agent as most readers out there. Over the years, however, Pendergast has grown less interesting and more . . . well, more predictable. I sometimes find myself speaking his lines in my head before I read them. He doesn't surprise me anymore. He has become a caricature of himself, which is disappointing.

Preston and Child have succumbed to two of the most egregious failings of recent popular fiction. First, Fever Dream has a plethora of mini-chapters (many are 2-3 pages in length), which work to push the plot forward but allow no time for character development or depth. This leads to the second failing - the novel is nothing more than its fairly absurd plot. I'm as willing as most to suspend my disbelief as mutated scientists wreak havoc on musty museums or crazed lunatics plot dastardly deeds against family members. But to make those stories work, we have to really care about the characters, the settings, and the world Preston/Child have so beautifully created. In Fever Dream, we get a bunch of the expected characters (Pendergast, D'Agosta, Laura Haywood) acting pretty much as we expect them to act. The central plot, however - about Pendergast's hunt for the people who murdered his wife twelve years earlier - doesn't make a whole lot of sense.
Read more ›
4 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?