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Field Guide to Meat: How to Identify, Select, and Prepare Virtually Every Meat, Poultry, and Game Cut Paperback – February 1, 2005

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Frequently Bought Together

Field Guide to Meat: How to Identify, Select, and Prepare Virtually Every Meat, Poultry, and Game Cut + Field Guide to Produce: How to Identify, Select, and Prepare Virtually Every Fruit and Vegetable at the Market + Field Guide to Seafood
Price for all three: $37.36

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Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

What are variety meats? What differentiates a T-bone from a porterhouse steak? How do you store foie gras? How do you prepare ground veal? And what does head cheese taste like? This most useful of kitchen references answers all those burning questions and more, in clean, matter-of-fact text accompanied by catalogue-type color photographs of everything from beef rolls to rack of lamb and smoked turkey wings. Green (Field Guide to Produce) covers beef, veal, pork, lamb, poultry and game birds, game and other domesticated meats (which includes rattlesnake and squirrel), and sausage and cured meats. Each compact chapter explains the various cuts available and gives instructions on choosing, storing and preparing. Home cooks will find Green's guidelines on how much to buy of a given product helpful, while professionals will appreciate her inclusion of North American Meat Producers, or NAMP, cut numbers and names. And all chefs will benefit from the listing of international names for each meat (e.g., beef cheeks are called guancia in Italian, joue in French and mejilla or cachete in Spanish). (May)

About the Author

Aliza Green is a chef, food writer, and teacher based in Philadelphia. She is the author of Field Guide to Produce and the co-author of the James Beard Award–winning cookbook Ceviche!: Seafood, Salads, and Cocktails with a Latino Twist.
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Product Details

  • Series: Field Guide
  • Paperback: 400 pages
  • Publisher: Quirk Books (February 1, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1594740178
  • ISBN-13: 978-1594740176
  • Product Dimensions: 4.5 x 1.1 x 5.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (28 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #273,587 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Aliza Green, the Philadelphia-based cookbook author, journalist and pioneering chef, is the author of thirteen highly successful cookbooks including her newest, The Soupmaker's Kitchen, to be published July 1st and available now for pre-sale on Amazon. Her Making Artisan Pasta, a step-by-step full color guide to making a world of fresh pasta has been garnering outstanding reviews and strong sales. It was selected by Cooking Light Magazine as one of its Top 100 Cookbooks of the Last 25 Years--quite an honor in a field of thousands!

Researching Making Artisan Pasta in Italy inspired Green to gather a small group of food lovers to explore the Southern Italian region of Puglia, which she calls, "land of 1,000-year-old olive trees", in a tour taking place October 2 to 9, 2013. The group will be visiting wineries, experiencing the region's best and most authentic restaurants, markets, and artisan food producers, exploring world cultural sites, and will join in two cooking classes. For details, visit WWW.ALIZAGREEN.COM and click on the Puglia tour page.

Green's book, The Butcher's Apprentice, (Quarry Books, 2012) contains fascinating interviews with a rancher raising Japanese Wagyu cattle, a couple who produce Italian-quality prosciutto in Iowa because that's where the pigs are, a Jewish deli owner, a "new wave" hunter, a humane slaughterhouse designer, and an chef in Umbria who serves only meat from her family's farm. Interspersed are clear, full-color step by step techniques for cutting and trimming various types and cuts of meat and poultry that even the novice will be confident enough to try.

The perfect companion book is her Field Guide to Meat: How to Identify, Select, and Prepare Virtually Every Meat, Poultry, and Game Cut (Quirk Books 2005) earned top praises from Food & Wine and Real Simple.

The Fishmonger's Apprentice (Quarry Books 2011) is full of step by step techniques for working with everything from geoduck to swordfish, from abalone to crayfish, flatfish and round fish. Interviews with experts in fishing like the five Portuguese families who started the sustainable American Albacore Tuna Association, a third-generation lobsterman from Maine, the manager of the Honolulu wholesale fish auction, and person who runs London's Billingsgate Fish Market, which has been in continuous operation for over 1,000 year! The book comes with a DVD showing Aliza preparing a dozen fish and seafood dishes plus recipes from renowned chefs.

Field Guide to Produce: How to Identify, Select, and Prepare Virtually Every Fruit and Vegetable at the Market (Quirk Books 2004), was recommended by the New York Times, Men's Health, and Shape and has sold over 50,000 copies. Her personal favorite is Field Guide to Herbs & Spices (Quirk Books 2006), a compact guide to common but also rare and unusual spices from around the world. Field Guide to Seafood (Quirk Books 2007) is a complete guide to choosing fish and shellfish, whether you live in the US or abroad. The series of four food field guides is a must on the shelves of food writers, editors, and culinary students.

Her masterly Starting with Ingredients: Quintessential Recipes for the Way We Really Cook was published to outstanding reviews. With over 550 recipes and detailed, practical, information about the background, culture, history, and uses of 100 important ingredients, this book flies off the shelves in the United Stated and Canada. Starting with Ingredients: Baking does for baking what the first book did for general cooking in 60 chapters. Find uncommon international recipes, detailed ingredient information, and dozens of invaluable tips.

¡Ceviche!: Seafood, Salads, and Cocktails With a Latino Twist (Running Press 2001), which Green co-authored with chef Guillermo Pernot, received a James Beard Award for "Best Single Subject Cookbook." Her book, The Bean Bible: A Legumaniac's Guide to Lentils, Peas, and Every Edible Bean on the Planet! (Running Press 2000), was described by Booklist as "a comprehensive guide to the world of beans and bean cookery belongs in every cookbook collection." When Running Press re-released it as as Beans: More than 200 Delicious, Wholesome Recipes from Around the World with new photographs and recipes, the book appeared in a New York Times feature on top holiday cookbooks.

The beautiful oversized book, Georges Perrier: Le Bec-Fin Recipes (Running Press 1997) features a collection of recipes from Philadelphia's landmark restaurant that Green co-wrote with the renowned French chef.

Green has conducted numerous cooking classes, had many television appearances and radio interviews, and is a highly reputed television and print food stylist. As one of the pioneer chefs who helped make the city of Philadelphia a dining destination, Green began her career in the mid-1970's as Executive Chef at the renowned Ristorante DiLullo, where her culinary achievements landed the restaurant a prestigious four-star rating. In 1988, The Philadelphia Inquirer inducted Chef Green into its Culinary Hall of Fame, citing her as one of the ten most influential people in the city's food industry for her uncompromising efforts at working with local farmers.

Green cites her childhood, which she spent traveling and living abroad, as the inspiration for her culinary pursuits. She has been reading about, writing about and preparing and perfecting food for most of her life. Today, Green spends her time writing food guides and cookbooks, consulting to restaurants and institutional food service providers, teaching, and leading culinary tours.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

46 of 47 people found the following review helpful By B. Marold HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on May 9, 2005
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
`Field Guide to Meat' by Aliza Green is part of the series of very handy pocket sized, sturdily bound, heavy covered paperbacks by Quirk Books. Ms. Green also wrote the `Field Guide to Produce' for the same series, to which I gave a very favorable review. This book, I feel, is even more useful as a volume you own and consult often. The difference may be less in the relative quality of the books but in the relative availability of good cookbooks and reference books devoted exclusively to meat and those devoted to fruits and vegetables. Vegetables as a group are supported by superb books from leading culinary writers such as Jack Bishop, Alice Waters, James Peterson, and most of all, Elizabeth Schneider and her volume, `Vegetables from Amaranth to Zucchini'.

Compared to these four, I know of only two leading writers, Bruce Aidell and the team of Schlesinger and Willoughby who have done good cookbooks covering a wide range of meats, and even these books don't give as broad a coverage as the veggie crowd.

These two books solve the amateur cook's knotty problem of wandering through the market, being able to tell what looks good, and then thinking up something to do with the good stuff. When I see some especially good looking pork chops, there is only one thing I can thing of doing with them. If I wanted to stuff them, I would not be sure I knew what I would need, as all my pork chop stuffing recipes are sitting on my bookshelf at home. With these books in hand, you will can get a much better idea of the variety of things you can do with a cut of meat from this book than from virtually any other source I can think of.
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71 of 77 people found the following review helpful By jerry i h on April 25, 2007
Format: Paperback
It makes my heart heavy to suspect a cookbook author of lacking veracity, but here, J'ACCUSE. If you are looking for a book that will educate you how to choose a good piece of meat or learn how the cuts of meat differ, you must look elsewhere. Please do not buy this book. To answer your next question, this is a lousy book that should have been rejected out of hand by the editor and never seen the light of day.

NAMP (North American Meat Producers) has its official guide The Meat Buyers Guide : Meat, Lamb, Veal, Pork and Poultry to meat that is often used by professional chefs. It is quite informative, but also costs a Ulysses Grant. I applaud the effort to produce a similar, less expensive handbook for consumers that costs only an Andrew Jackson (or small enough to toss into your chef's bag), but this book ain't it.

The author genuinely does not seem to understand the subject of which he/she speaks. It would not surprise me to learn that the author is close to being a vegan (I would like to know how many nights a week the author features a huge chunk of meat as the main course for dinner). It is lacking in practical particulars and spectacularly unhelpful to the meat buyer puzzling over the meat case in a grocery store; the `how to choose' section is especially worthless if you are holding a Styrofoam and cellophane wrapped package in your hand at the supermarket. It seems to be one of those books `invented' in front of the word processor. I suggest you save your shekels and buy the NAMP if you must.
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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful By AuntieEm on September 16, 2005
Format: Paperback
Great, information, written in an easy to understand manner. Great illustrations. What an informative book. Sometimes recipes call for a cut of meat (e.g. london broil) and you say huh? this book explaines what the cut is, what it should look like and how to cook it. A great follow up to Field Guide to Vegetables
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Vicki K. Schneider on August 8, 2005
Format: Paperback
Although I love fine meats and food, I have always been intimidated by the idea of asking for special pieces from the butcher. I thought this book might help me learn about different cuts of beef. I was pleasantly surprised by how well it taught me that, and SO much more! My family has learned how long different meats can be stored, new ways to prepare them, etc. Fantastic!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By J. Turner on March 26, 2007
Format: Paperback
If you end up buying hamburger every time because it is the only meat you know how to cook, or can't figure out why one cut of beef makes a tender steak while another cooks up like a bus tire, do yourself a favor and buy this book.

First, what I didn't like: I often wished for better illustrations showing where on the animal cut resides. The one diagram in the front of each section was not as detailed as I would have liked and it was a bit of a pain to turn back to it all the time.

Now, what I did like: The description of each cut includes cooking method and flavor affinities. If you know some basic techniques and have some common herbs and spices in your cupboard you have enough of a recipe right there to turn your meat into a meal.

There is also great coverage of charcuterie and game.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A. V., BBQ on November 2, 2008
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I like the short, to the point explainations she gives. Moreover, she gives, not only the common names of meat cuts, but also the less common/antique names that you sometimes find given in old recipes, or secret cuts offered by the best butchers that if you did not have this guide, you would be lost. I did not know what the beef "butterball" roast was, but when I ended up with a portion of this suculent cut in a side of beef I purchased, and loved it, it was this book that educated me as to what cut I had enjoyed (I now regularly go to my buthcher and request a Butterball). She also gives, what I have come to trust as some solid, culinary sound, recipe recomendations on how the meats can be prepared. This may not be a 1st buy reference guide for the novice cook, but if you are a new chef, or if you are a "back yard chef" looking for the knowledge to empress your friends, get this book. Get it.
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