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A Field Guide to Mexican Birds: Mexico, Guatemala, Belize, El Salvador (Peterson Field Guides) Paperback – March 1, 1999


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Product Details

  • Series: Peterson Field Guides
  • Paperback: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt (March 1, 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 039597514X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0395975145
  • Product Dimensions: 7.2 x 4.5 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.3 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (23 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #89,987 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Roger Tory Peterson, one of the world's greatest naturalists, received every major award for ornithology, natural science, and conservation as well as numerous honorary degrees, medals, and citations, including the Presidential Medal of Freedom. The Peterson Identification System has been called the greatest invention since binoculars. These editions include updated material by Michael O'Brien, Paul Lehman, Bill Thompson III, Michael DiGiorgio, Larry Rosche, and Jeffrey A. Gordon.

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Customer Reviews

3.1 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

55 of 56 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 3, 2000
Format: Paperback
Although this book is up to Peterson standards it only contains the birds in Mexico not found in the North American guide. For example this book contains no shore birds. If you are out bird watching in Mexico you will need to bring both books.
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72 of 75 people found the following review helpful By Edward J Stone on July 4, 2000
Format: Paperback
This book describes birds of Mexico in the usual annoying Peterson format - decription on one page, illustration on another. The illustrations and descriptions are good, and for birds of Mexico, there are only a couple other guides to choose from. Two problems:
1. Mexican birds that are covered in Peterson's guides to the birds of North America, or the guide to birds of Texas, are not illustrated. You'll have to bring at least one other book.
2. Really glaring omission: no mention of the Spanish names of the birds! Did Peterson really think we would do all our Mexican birding from the north bank of the Rio Grande, with a really good spotting scope? (The Spanish names of the birds can be found on the website of the Museo de las Aves)
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33 of 34 people found the following review helpful By Klaas Tjoelker on April 16, 2001
Format: Paperback
Other reviewers have already indicated the limitations of this book: pictures of many species and Spanish names are missing. I would add that the bibliography is lacking up-to-date references to the most usefull other guides about Mexican birds:
- A Guide to the Birds of Mexico and Northern Central America, by Steve N.G. Howell and Sophie Webb;
- A field guide to the birds of Mexico and Adjacent Areas, by Ernest Preston Edwards. (revised edition, 1998)
Both these books also have their limitations but they are essential complements to Peterson's guide and Howell and Webb's guide is much more comprehensive.
For Spanish-speaking people I would strongly recommend to buy the Spanish version of Peterson's guide:
- Aves de Mexico. Guía de Campo. (Editorial Diana, Mexico).
This Spanish version includes explanations and pictures of all Mexican birds and it even has the English names (no index of English names, however). Amazon is not stocking this title but perhaps they will, if you insist.
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21 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Christopher J. Sharpe on November 17, 2005
Format: Paperback
Peterson pioneered field guides for American wildlife identification and they are still the best choice for many groups in North America. However, I think Peterson stretched himself in trying to cover the massive Mexican avifauna. And this particular Peterson has not kept pace with the much improved, newer field guides, so it has now become all but obsolete. It's still useful as an aide memoire for the pocket, but for the last ten years the best field guide to Mexican birds has been Howell and Webb and it looks unlikely to be superceded while I'm still birding. Though Edwards is an interesting book, I'm not sure I agree with the suggestion of using it as a serious field guide. So, either buy Howell and Webb or wait for Peterson to be thoroughly revised or perhaps for another pocket-sized guide to appear.
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29 of 31 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 24, 2002
Format: Paperback
I love Peterson's Guides, but the birds of Mexico is severely lacking. The art certainly holds up to the standard set by the guides to North America, but unfortunately, it can only be considered complete if you tag along two other Peterson Guides. Perhaps a good addition if you wish to complete your collection of Peterson Guides, but otherwise, buy Howell's or Edward's Guides, both of which far outshine this guide when considered alone. Howell's is certainly the most complete, but Edward's guide is a bit handier in the field.
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18 of 21 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 4, 2001
Format: Paperback
I ordered this book, used, even though there was an unfavorable review. I have a number of Peterson books and like them all. The Mexican book is the exception. The one I received was from a very old edition, had incomplete illustrations of many birds, making identification difficult to impossible, and did not picture many birds found in other Peterson guide books. It is the worst. The reseller did ship the book promptly but I did not pay attention to the edition date and was unaware that there was a later edition of the book.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By R. Serrano on July 31, 2006
Format: Paperback
Attention, publisher and smart shoppers: Can we all agree that even paperback reference books should be securely bound to support repeated, long-term use? A BIRD BOOK should be bound like a Sherman tank because it ought to withstand being tossed into a backpack and perused in the swampy jungle. My copy of Roger Tory Peterson's "Mexican Birds" is almost new and I've opened it just a couple dozen times inside our air-conditioned home in Ixtapa. Yet this morning, as I was trying to determine whether the yellow-bellied bird in the Parota tree outside our window was a Great Kiskadee or a Boat-billed Flycatcher, I set the open book down on my desk and eight of the color plates separated from the binding! What Lesser Yellow-Headed Vulture engineered the binding of this book? (made in U.S.) I own Penguin paperback detective novels that hold together better than this, even though I don't need them to do so. So to the publishers, I must quote the purported cry of the extinct Do-Do Bird, "DUH!" To my fellow birders, I say, come to Mexico! We have woodpeckers and Egrets galore, White-Throated Magpie Jays (who have twice hovered a few feet in front of our faces, yodelling softly while they watch us back!), Yellow-Winged Caciques (who gather together in trees by the hundreds at bedtime and whoosh out in a long, musical procession at dawn) and much more! (I list only birds we see DAILY in our Club de Golf, Ixtapa neighborhood!) But when you come, bring a field guide with a better binding than this one. Happy birding!
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