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A Field Guide to Trees and Shrubs (Peterson Field Guides) Paperback – September 6, 1973

ISBN-13: 978-0395175798 ISBN-10: 0395175798 Edition: 2nd

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 448 pages
  • Publisher: Houghton Mifflin; 2nd edition (September 6, 1973)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0395175798
  • ISBN-13: 978-0395175798
  • Product Dimensions: 7.1 x 4.4 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #843,681 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Roger Tory Peterson, one of the world's greatest naturalists, received every major award for ornithology, natural science, and conservation, as well as numerous honorary degrees, medals, and citations, including the Presidential Medal of Freedom. The Peterson Identification System has been called the greatest invention since binoculars, and the Peterson Field Guides® are credited with helping to set the stage for the environmental movement.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Chris Todd on May 30, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I like this book as an introductory reference guide to learning how to identify trees and shrubs. What makes it a strong book is the first chapter that shows you details about how to identify if a tree is, for instance, alternating or opposite, if the end buds are false or true, if the the pith is chambered or hollow, and the words used to describe the structure of leaves.

In addition there are great leaf identification pages, silhouette identification, and useful tips. I was excited when I actually found the fabled ash-leaf maple and could positively identify it. I'm enjoying this wonderful new hobby of learning the names of all the plants I see.

It's only weakness is that it has not been updated since 1986 so some of the tree species have been reclassified with new genetic information. That said, it's an amazing tool for the beginner and intermediate to start learning and exploring.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Barry Sharpe on August 25, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I live in a part of Oklahoma that transitions from prairie to eastern woodlands. On my 35 acres I have oak trees more than a hundred feet tall, elm trees that large, too, hickory, pecan, hackberry and locust, soapberry and eastern red cedar. And a whole lot more.
Ever try to decide if a tree was a hickory or a pecan when its leaves we're off? I have and this book helps.
There are half a dozen varieties of oak alone, three or four outside my bedroom. This book allows the user several methods to identify and classify different tree species.
It's really been good to me.
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Format: Paperback
Normally, I'm a big fan of Peterson Field Guides, the birds and wildflower books are great. However, this book misses the mark horribly and is not for the average consumer or newcomer to identifying things in the wild. Most of the text is written as if the reader were an experience botanist or dendrologist. In short, this thing needs a total re-write or needs to be classified as a college textbook or scientific reference book.

Cons:

There are drawings only, zero photographs.

The text is hard to read and incomplete in some places. (things like tree height are wholly missing.)

The identifying pictures are not with the species' text, causing the reader to flip around needlessly.

The drawings are adequate but not detailed enough for good ID.

Pros:

There are some details about species not found in other guides, so this makes for a good supplemental guide.

Basically, this book should be completely re-worked with photographs and new, easier to understand and read text, with the text accompanying the photos of the species. The silhouette portion of the book should be thrown out entirely as it's wholly misleading in many examples, with some major types missing. At least they should be near the species mentioned instead of in their own section.

Hope they re-work this book, because their other guides are really good, this one is terrible and Audobon Society's guide beats it hands down and is my "go to" book for identifying trees and shrubs because they have photos and great info about each.
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By MTrac on May 25, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I'm a Wildlife Ecology undergrad at UMaine. I purchased this field guide for a two week field techniques class I had in a wildlife refuge down east. I can tell you that this was not a helpful resource.
The format is terrible. The illustrations of twigs and leaf formation are 20-30 pages away from the text description of the plant, the ranges are not graphically displayed, and some distinguishing features are missing.
Overall, it is not easy to use when you're standing in front of an unknown plant, trying to ID it.
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