Fifty Million Frenchmen

January 1, 1991 | Format: MP3

$8.99
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Song Title Artist
Time
Popularity Prime  
1
3:28
2
3:06
3
1:09
4
2:55
5
3:03
6
2:34
7
3:36
8
2:58
9
1:50
10
3:10
11
2:30
12
3:12
13
2:28
14
0:49
15
1:02
16
1:28
17
2:27
18
2:30
19
2:36
20
3:10
21
1:37
22
1:36


Product Details

  • Original Release Date: January 1, 1991
  • Label: New World Records
  • Copyright: (c) 1991 Anthology of Recorded Music, Inc.
  • Total Length: 53:14
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B0040I86P4
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #257,005 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

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See all 8 customer reviews
If you can find a copy, I suggest that you snap it up quickly!
Alfonzo Tyson
The Tale of the Oyster is as witty as a song gets - "Down by the sea lived a lonely oyster, every day getting sadder and moister."
ljs
Here Kay McClelland captures the poignancy as well as the whimsy of this small treasure.
Sturgis

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

26 of 27 people found the following review helpful By R. J. Rozen on January 30, 2000
Format: Audio CD
An unjustly neglected work, this 1929 musical was Porter's first Broadway hit. Although it does not display the string of memorable songs found in "Anything Goes" or "Kiss Me Kate," it features "You Do Something to Me" (and, in true Porter fashion, it's the first song after the overture). The remaining songs are all delightful, from the rollicking "Find Me a Primitive Man" to the bittersweet "You Don't Know Paree." The performances are uniformly good; special kudos to Kim Criswell in the "Ethel Merman" role (even though Merman didn't play the role on B-way). And it's a delight to hear Peggy Cass, who made her mark on Broadway in "Mame," singing the specialty number "Queen of Terre Haute" (a song cut from the original run but restored for this recording--bravo!). Porter adored Paris, as he would later demonstrate in "Can-Can" and "Silk Stockings." This is, however, his quintessential love song to the City of Light.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By S. Lehne on June 20, 2006
Format: Audio CD
Every true musical theatre fan has heard of Cole Porter, but for many this acquaintance does not extend beyond his most famous hits, Kiss Me Kate, Anything Goes, possibly CanCan or Silk Stockings...they are therefore unaware that the quintessential Porter recording is in fact this studio cast version of his 1929 show Fifty Million Frenchmen. This is not to say that this is his greatest score, far from it, but it showcases everything that is glorious about the work of one of the greatest songwriters broadway has ever seen. Porter's music is not heavy, his songs do little to enhance the dramatic action, but most exhibit a charming simplicity or a rollicking tongue-in-cheek comic style which is utterly irresistable. The songs on this recording are all trademark Porter musical moments, they celebrate his well-documented love of Paris and his enjoyment of high society and its shadier entertainments. The love songs are not heartrenching perhaps, but each is lovely and touching in its own special way. The cast is highly capable, their own delight in the material is palpable and only serves to enhance that of the audience. Howard McGillin displays a lovely light tenor which is used to great effect in the pretty opening You do Something to Me which sets the tone for the whole recording. He is also wonderfully upbeat in the sprightly ensemble number Do You Want to See Paris? which contains the brilliant lyric: "We are now in the theatre called the Moulin Rouge an old Parisian pet. Where the men that girls remember meet the girls that men forget." He also gets what is probably the closest to a truly moving song that Porter ever came: You Don't Know Paree.Read more ›
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Alfonzo Tyson on June 30, 2002
Format: Audio CD
"Fifty Million Frenchmen" is Cole Poter's first complete Broadway score and one of his best! It has the lovely ballad "You Don't Know Paree" ( a song that I'm sure was very close to Cole's heart, being a lifelong admiere of Paris), the racy cabaret "Find Me a Primitive Man" and "You've Got That Thing". I guarantee that "Where Would You Get Your Coat" will have you in stitches. Plus, it has "You Do Something to Me" which contains the famous line "Do do that voodoo that you do so well". If you can find a copy, I suggest that you snap it up quickly!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By ljs on July 6, 2007
Format: Audio CD
but as the other reviewers have said this one has the essence of everything he did so well. Number after number is melodic, witty and just wonderful. I would disagree with the reviewer who said that You Don't Know Paris is Porter's most emotionally affecting ballad - So In Love from Kiss Me Kate is my favorite song, bar none, and packs every bit as strong an emotional wallop if it's done well. Argument aside, McGillin does full justice to a very heartfelt love song to Paris. And yes, Porter at his most affecting can wring your heart as thoroughly as Lorenz Hart.

My favorites here are the Tale of the Oyster, Find Me a Primitive Man, and I'm Unlucky at Gambling. The Tale of the Oyster is as witty as a song gets - "Down by the sea lived a lonely oyster, every day getting sadder and moister." Find Me a Primitive Man throbs, and the French translation just sends it over the top - "Trouve-moi un homme primitif," indeed. I'm Unlucky at Gambling is just sly - I took the croupier to a picture show, the croupier impressed me as rather slow, I said 'I like John Gilbert a lot, don't you?' But when the show was over and love was through, I realized that he liked John Gilbert, too." And Porter wrote this in 1929.

As for the rest, there's not a dud in the bunch. Porter had that thing, that certain thing, and this album shows it in spades. Lovingly produced and lusciously rendered. It's a gem and a must have.
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