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345 of 388 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The most underrated film of the last year
When I'm looking at the Top Ten list's of America's critics and the nominations of the DGA,WGA and all the other guilds and press associations, I terribly miss David Fincher's outstanding film "Fight Club", which is possibly the best film of 1999.
Not only is the film visualy stunning, it is also very thought-provoking, wickedly funny and, above all,...
Published on February 10, 2000 by behet@stud.uni-frankfurt.de

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312 of 376 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars This Movie doesn't care what you rate it...
It's a number. A star. A rating. Tyler knows that. He doesn't care. He's just pleased to know that in a world where even God doesn't know most people's name, there's another man who knows who Tyler Durden is.

Tyler Durden lets Big Lou punch him repeatedly in the jaw, while laughing maniacally, mocking him and infuriating him. At the end of the scene, Tyler...
Published on January 23, 2006 by YellowLedbetter


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345 of 388 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The most underrated film of the last year, February 10, 2000
When I'm looking at the Top Ten list's of America's critics and the nominations of the DGA,WGA and all the other guilds and press associations, I terribly miss David Fincher's outstanding film "Fight Club", which is possibly the best film of 1999.
Not only is the film visualy stunning, it is also very thought-provoking, wickedly funny and, above all, extremely entertaining. Only few films managed to be so many things at once. David Fincher, in my opinion one of the most exciting directors of the decade, fills his movie with so many ideas that it would be sufficient for three more movies, and they are not just gimmicks for their own sake, they all mean something. Edward Norton and Brad Pitt are brilliant in the leads and the soundtrack by the Dust Brothers fits perfectly to the images.
Many reviewers thought the film was fascist. I think you can only call this ridiculous, since that assumes Fincher sympathizes with Tyler Durden's project mayhem. In fact, he invites us to form our own opinion, like Stanley Kubrick did in "A Clockwork Orange". "Fight Club" hands over the resposibility to the viewer. This may be uncomfortable to some, others (like myself) will embrace this.
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142 of 158 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The year's best satire, February 2, 2000
By 
"pocock" (Princeton, NJ) - See all my reviews
FIGHT CLUB arrived in the US with a blaze of publicity stressing its violence and nihilism; some critics (and those close to the production) countered this with the suggestion that it was an anti-materialist jeremiad. On a second viewing, it seems like neither -- it's easier to see it as a smart, committed and complex piece of filmmaking. David Fincher once again dazzles with his direction, which is as intelligently energetic as the acting of Brad Pitt and, especially, Edward Norton. What's really impressive, however, is the way that the film manages to flirt with an anti-materialist, hyper-masculine primitivism even as it suggests that we're all a little too sophisticated to buy it (as it were).
FIGHT CLUB may hold that we're not the clothes we wear, or the credit cards in our wallet, but it's savvy enough to realise that our paths of thought and modes of organisation are almost entirely contaminated by the world we've created. Is the solution to destroy that world? Well, that's an option -- but watch closely in the movie's second half and see how subtly and hilariously Fincher undermines this: the anarchists begin to chant management-speak, to dissolve into a collective identity, and to form franchises as if they were selling frappucino rather than revolution. Norton is especially horrified at all this, and his wonderful reactions to the disintegration of 'Project Mayhem' are the calm (and moral) centre of the film. Rather like ANIMAL FARM, Fincher tells us that we can have our revolution, but it's going to cost us dear; perhaps even the individuality and reason which we'd hoped to gain from our actions.
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199 of 234 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This Movie is Why "Professional" Critics Must Go, April 29, 2000
By 
A. Fultz (Santa Barbara, CA, USA) - See all my reviews
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I didn't see this movie in the theaters because it had gotten very mixed reviews from the so-called professional movie reviewers. But, when it hit the local vidoe store, I thought I would give it a try. WOW, what a kick in the teeth, interesting, and fast moving journey into one man's mind. The path this movie takes is fantastic.
Norton and Pitt are perfectly cast, and supported by a crew of fight club members that make for a well-acted show. Meatloaf, Ed Gil, Jared Leto, et. al. are great in support as the members/followers of the leads. Helena Bonham Carter has the only real female role in this film and is perfectly cast. But as much as the acting, this movie is made by the story. Unconventional, with a great twist at the end, the whole movie kept me on the edge of my seat. As with many great movies, it is hard to classify the genre (action, comedy, drama), as there is a sampling of all in this film. In the end, I would just classify this as a great film.
Much was made of the violence of this movie when it first hit the theaters. Those critics overstated the case. There is blood and violence in the movie, but it is not excessive and it serves the plot well.
If you missed this in the theater, see it now. If you saw it once, see it again. I will.
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312 of 376 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars This Movie doesn't care what you rate it..., January 23, 2006
It's a number. A star. A rating. Tyler knows that. He doesn't care. He's just pleased to know that in a world where even God doesn't know most people's name, there's another man who knows who Tyler Durden is.

Tyler Durden lets Big Lou punch him repeatedly in the jaw, while laughing maniacally, mocking him and infuriating him. At the end of the scene, Tyler seems to make the point: Real men don't always beat the crap out of other men, Real Men laugh silly at other men who try their best to make them feel pain, but only fail repeatedly. How would you feel if you sucked in all the power you had, landed a blow on a dude, and he laughed in your face as if to say, "That's your best shot?" Not very good, I think.

Tyler Durden [Brad Pitt] is the manifestation of every man's fantasy. Good-looking, brash, arrogant, fights like a tank, takes a beating like a tank, ****s like a machine and doesn't do any REAL work.

The Narrator [Ed Norton] is the manifestation of most modern men's reality. Plain-looking, dead-end job, no stable relationship, a decent collection of lifestyle accessories and sheer boredom.

When the two meet, you might expect the movie takes the usual route where the two men get to learn from each other, and find that each person's life has as many highs as pitfalls, and that your life is what you make of it. Err...no. Tyler is an enigma. A revolutionary of sorts. Hell, he isn't here to "learn" about the Narrator. He's here to "Jack" his life!!! Tyler Durden is a bigger, larger-than-life figure than James Bond, the Terminator or even Neo. He could easily steal any one of Bond's potential bed-mates from right under his nose. He could easily program the Terminator to believe its existence was useless and that it should self-terminate. He might even make Neo give-up and dump the whole "Because I choose to.." talk.

This movie may not "change" your life, but it will affect it. You will develop a liking for red leather. You will start working on a new walk. You will start sizing people up everywhere you go. You will stop caring about the fact that you're a 6-foot 120-lbs weakling with 13" biceps. You will start to think, "I'm sure I could throw ONE good dislocating punch at a 220lbs biker even after I take 4 punches to my face". You will want to be in better shape. You will cringe at the idea of a woman having any kind of control over your life. You will want to learn the art of dead-pan sarcasm that scares your boss out of his/her wits. Watch this movie, and you will wish that someday, people will ask, "Say, Who is (insert your name)?"

One of the better "mainstream" movies to have come out of Hollywood in recent years. Unless you exclusively like movies with a "Made for Oscars" plot [Disabled dude learns to appreciate life, WWII/Vietnam Veteran learn the value of human life,Gay Dude stands up against the system, etc.], you will have a hard time wondering why this movie didn't win a few dozen awards. In Tyler, You Can Trust.
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44 of 51 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Love it or hate it, it's a masterpiece., December 20, 1999
By 
Erik Blood "shizzam" (Seattle, WA United States) - See all my reviews
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Many of the people I know who didn't enjoy this movie simply didn't get it. Some were threatened by the attitude towards consumerism. Others found the violence too much, or even worse, over done. But no one came out of that theatre with something they'd expected or something they could forget about. Those who went in for an action flick were forced to watch a literate, existential, art film with violence that they couldn't get excited about because it had meaning. Those who wanted to see Brad Pitt saw Brad Pitt and paid little mind to the brilliant story brought to us by one of the finest new American authors, Chuck Palaniuk. And the rest were offended by the negative attitude toward their favorite coffee chains, clothing stores, and/or furniture outlet. I say good.
Some wonderful things about this movie, not giving anything away, are that the characters that are fighting the above mentioned institutions are also willing participants in making them as successful as they are, and the body count is as low as a big budget Hollywood film has been in years. Don't believe me? Check it out.
As a film, it stands out as one of the most creative and beautifully shot movies this year. David Fincher, not being bound by convention, made one of the best adaptations from novel to screen ever with Fight Club.
This film will speak to everyone. To some it will say horrible things they do not want to hear. To others it will touch a place you never knew you had in you. Read the book if you want to really know the philosophy. See the movie for a demonstration.
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40 of 48 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Who is Tyler Durden?, May 29, 2000
Fincher's Fight Club opens in a mysterious semi-darkness, both comforting and disquieting, autistic and boundless, vaguely familiar. But it is only when we are expelled from this strangely biomorphic womb-like place we realise that we have been within the deep recesses of our protagonist's mind. In a shaky pullback we emerge from Jack's mouth that has the barrel of a gun jammed inside it.
Jack is a loner, a man going nowhere fast, an angst-ridden emasculated wage-slave with terrible insomnia. He seeks solace, rather bizarrely, in victim support groups, feeding off the misery of others Sleep comes to him at last and he becomes addicted to the self-help ethos. That is, until he is exposed by another fake attendee, Marla. Without the group empathy and misery-fix to soothe his troubles, Jack hurtles deeper into depression, culminating in his apartment exploding. In his deep dark night of the soul he turns to Tyler Durden.
Tyler Durden is the embodiment of pure id: an existential nihilist, a sociopath with terrorist inclinations, inhabiting a dilapidated decaying brownstone on the edge of existence. He scavenges human fat from liposuction clinics to make into soap to sell back to the rich ladies it came from; urinates in the soup of the restaurant in which he works; and, moonlighting as a projectionist, he splices single frames of pornography into family movies. The disruption of the social ethic is his prime motivation.
When the two men get into a fight, Jack is amazed how exhilarated he is by the raw, unfettered violence. Consequently, the Fight Club is formed, a secret society of like-minded males prepared to go one-on-one with bare-knuckles. But, "the first rule of Fight Club is that you don't talk about Fight Club", and with the movie it's true too: here I depart from plot details. But let me say this: Fight Club is not a fighting picture (Van Damme fans be warned) and it is as far removed from the escapist blockbuster that people expected as it is possible to get (hence its box office failure). But, quite simply, Fight Club is, without doubt, one of the most subversive pieces of cinema, ever. And. With a denouement twist that is, unlike The Sixth Sense, impossible to guess.
Based on a controversial novel by Chuck Palanhiuk, Fight Club is a relentlessly dark, tortuous journey of one man's self-discovery. Hoisted up to greatness by Fincher's incredible vision and by career best performances from both Norton and Pitt, it is one of those rare films that is quite unlike anything that has preceded it. It is intelligent, funny, ultra-violent, touching, repulsive, in equal measures: and, an excruciatingly accurate study of maleness and virility to boot (which, critics take heed, doesn't automatically make the film misogynist [in the same way the human soap factor doesn't make it anti-Semitic]).
Throw aside your expectations, Fight Club is a modern masterpiece of the dark fantastic.
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36 of 43 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars DEVASTATING AND POWERFUL!, March 5, 2001
By 
Michael Crane (Orland Park, IL USA) - See all my reviews
This has to be one of the best movies ever made! Fight Club tells the tale of an insomniac who is losing his grip on reality. Then, he meets Tyler, and that is when all hell breaks out! The naration given by Edward Norton is powerful and haunting, and it makes the suspense and terror seem that more realistic. This is the kind of movie where you cannot tell the story to others too much without giving the whole movie away. The ending is one of the best I have ever seen in a movie since Usual Suspects. This is a powerful movie which will make you believe that chaos can end all existence. I think EVERYONE should see this movie. It is gruesome and violent at times, but it's worth it! It's a shame that I can only give it 5 stars. It really should be 100 stars, or even more! Fight Club is without a dobt one of the best movies ever made!
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25 of 29 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A perfect 10!, November 16, 2003
By 
Jeremy (Detroit, MI) - See all my reviews
I will be the first to admit that I had doubts about Fight Club. When the movie was first promoted for its debut in theatres, the advertisements, I believe, gave a misrepresentative impression of the film's actual content. I thought, like many others, that Fight Club was going to be another lackluster production filled with all the clichés you would expect to see in a Van Damme-esque action misadventure. It took some goading but I finally decided to give this movie a chance, and I would highly suggest that anyone who has not should do the same.

For anyone who is tired of the prefabricated plot lines that dominate today's movie industry, you know the ones for teeny-boppers and the sequels to movies unfit for original production, Fight Club is a refreshing alternative. The star-studded cast, Edward Norton, Brad Pitt, and Helena Bonham Carter, provide the perfect chemistry for this deceptively brilliant critique of the modern man. David Fincher, who also collaborated with Pitt in the movie Seven, captures the essence Chuck Palahniuk's novel with beautiful cinematography.

The junior executive, played by Norton, is struggling to swallow his mundane existence. He suffers from a variety of ailments, from depression to insomnia. Norton's character, the narrator, whose name is never revealed during the film, an example of the subtle nuances that make this production so appealing, lacks a sense of identity, as is expressed in the following quote: "I'd look through the catalog and think, what kind of furniture defines me as a man?" Palahniuk, very cleverly, illustrates how disillusioned and materialistic society has become. Tyler's occupation of a soap salesman is yet another example. He sells his luxurious soap, made from lye and the pilfered fat from liposuction clinics, back to the very clients who supplied the materials.

Underneath the comedy, the drama, and, at times, the brutal violence, lays an exceptional social satire. Norton's character and his partner in crime Tyler Durden, played by Pitt, revolt against the twenty-first century image of man. A prime example of Palanhiuk's contempt for the feminization of man occurs when the two board a bus. They see a Calvin Klein advertisement of a perfectly groomed young adult male devoid of imperfections and body hair. Tyler asks, "Is that what a man looks like?" They both laugh and express their sympathy for people following the path of superficial self-improvement.

The film broaches some rather controversial social issues, which separate it from most conservative contemporary pieces. Many women, mothers especially, were offended by the line, "We're a generation of men raised by women; I'm wondering if another woman in my life is really what I need?" I thought that was a goal films; they are supposed to be about eliciting emotion.

This film's cast and director combined to produce a film that will not be soon forgotten. From the horror of the Norton and Leto fight scene to the compassion and sorrow of support group scenes, Fight Club takes you on an eye-opening voyage through the mind of a man gone mad from banality. If you have not watched Fight Club yet and are tired of the same regurgitated garbage, check it out next time you have a chance.
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31 of 37 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Really, Really, Really Good., October 18, 2000
I very nearly did not watch this one, I bungee jumped head-first into the conclusion that it would be about some macho guys fighting to determine who was the most macho. I was so wrong. Edward Norton plays the main protagonist, a cubicle worker for a large corporation, a man who's so devoid of life-force he can only find peace by attending self-help groups for the terminally ill. On a business trip he meets Tyler Durden, an easy-going salesman. They find that fighting - simply fighting, with no animosity or purpose - fulfills a need within themselves. Others join them, until they eventually have a club as fascist and mindless as the corporations they scorn. Along the way, the plot delves into some very dark and masochistic places, and the surrealistic story not so much draws us in, as forcibly abducts us, and we are played with, teased, and disturbed. The acting through-out is excellent. Brad Pitt completely becomes the charismatic Durden, who serves as our guide to this warped Underworld. Helena Bonham Carter is the morbid and trashy Marla Singer, a kind of groupie to the dying. Another excellent job was done by Meatloaf. There is a lot of pain here, but the pain and ugliness gives rise to black and sardonic humour, and by the end every last part of my soul, no matter how hard and critical, had been touched.
The questions this story asks are disturbing. How much pain are we inflicting on ourselves in order to feel alive? Are our comfortable modern lives at odds with, and at risk of being destroyed by, our innate need for struggle? When we reject one set of values do we fall prey to another? Oddly enough, given the violent theme and the black humour, there is no meanness here, and the characters are not set up to be made fun of, (which I felt was the case in American Beauty), nor do they need our sympathy. There is no intent on the part of the characters to destroy life, but rather to destroy that which prevents us from experiencing life. I loved it, I loved being held hostage by it, and I am grateful to the artists who made it.
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17 of 19 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great movie but this steelbox release offers nothing new, November 7, 2007
By 
Randall (Eureka, US, Canada) - See all my reviews
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I won't review the movie as others have done a fine job at that already - just feel compelled to add that if you already have the brown-wrapper 2-disc issued in 2000 then this steelcase edition offers no new content. Also, contrary to amazon's listing, this is NOT a DTS sound edition - it offers 5.1 dolby and below only. This is an excellent film - if you don't have the 2000 2DSE then by all means pick this up - the extras are marvelous. But don't make my mistake and buy it thinking it's new - it's just a repackaging of that 2000 edition.
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Fight Club (10th Anniversary Edition) [Blu-ray]
Fight Club (10th Anniversary Edition) [Blu-ray] by David Fincher (Blu-ray - 2009)
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