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Fighting Kentuckian


List Price: $19.95
Price: $12.58 & FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details
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$12.58 & FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details Only 4 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

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Product Details

  • Actors: John Wayne, Vera Ralston, Oliver Hardy, Marie Windsor, Philip Dorn
  • Directors: George Waggner
  • Writers: George Waggner
  • Producers: John Wayne
  • Format: Multiple Formats, Black & White, NTSC, Original recording remastered
  • Language: English
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.37:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: NR (Not Rated)
  • Studio: Olive Films
  • DVD Release Date: September 24, 2013
  • Run Time: 100 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (123 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00E4DJK78
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #8,943 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Editorial Reviews

John Wayne (The Quiet Man) sets the wild frontier ablaze in this thrilling romantic adventure! Set shortly after the Battle of New Orleans, the film casts Wayne as John Breen, a Kentucky trooper leading a regiment of Kentucky riflemen back home. The regiment passes through a settlement of French army refugees who were granted land by an act of Congress. Breen falls head over heels for the beautiful French general's daughter (Vera Ralston), but a rich and powerful rival, Blake Randolph (John Howard) also has his heart set on her. As the two suitors lock horns, Wayne discovers that his rival has a malicious scheme up his sleeve, and soon the courtship battle escalates into a full-scale war. George Waggner (The Wolf Man) wrote and directed this action-packed comedy adventure. The stellar cast includes comic legend Oliver Hardy, Hollywood bad-girl Marie Windsor with Philip Dorn and Paul Fix. It's "The Duke" at his best as The Fighting Kentuckian battles for his love and the land of the free!

Customer Reviews

It has lots of action and a plot that is easy to follow..
Riley Whitsett
The quality is poor however, as this DVD is not digitally remastered as most Classics have been.
Paul M. Grumelli
While not embarrassing herself too badly here, Ralston was not a real actress, and it shows.
Mark Savary

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

22 of 24 people found the following review helpful By Jennifer M. on April 25, 2003
Format: DVD
As another reviewer mentioned, the movie is a bit slow to start and leaves some plot points unexplained (yes, why *is* John Breen trying to get out of going with his regiment?) but is overall very enjoyable. Wayne is courtly and charming (nobody says "ma'am" like he does), and Oliver Hardy (showing off his native Georgian accent) is so adorable, I wanted to put him in my pocket. Truly an inspired piece of casting; thank goodness Wayne kept after Hardy when he initially refused to work without Stan Laurel. Vera Ralston as the French general's daughter was not the best choice, and I kept getting the two mustached villians mixed up, but I happily stayed with the movie until the "big calvary rescue" ending, and would watch it again. This DVD also includes some good behind the scenes photos, and plenty of interesting production notes.
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19 of 23 people found the following review helpful By Mark Savary on June 19, 2001
Format: DVD
"The Fighting Kentuckian" is the second movie that The DUKE produced for Republic Pictures. Unfortunately, while the first project, "Angel and the Badman" was a great success, this movie bordered on disaster.
In order to be given producing credit, DUKE had to hire the studio boss's girlfriend (Vera Ralston), to star opposite him. He knew she'd be no good for the picture, but DUKE's hands were tied.
One problem with Vera Ralston was that she had a Czech accent. The role she was playing was supposed to be a French woman! In the end, all the French characters had to be cast with Czechs and other Eastern Europeans so Ralston's accent would not stand out. While not embarrassing herself too badly here, Ralston was not a real actress, and it shows.
Oliver Hardy is great as DUKE's sidekick, although he was reluctant to do a project without his partner, Stan Laurel. Hardy had worked in a play with DUKE and John Ford just before filming began on "The Fighting Kentuckian", and DUKE really wanted Hardy in his next project. Hardy only agreed after Laurel, ill at the time, talked him into it.
There's quite a bit that's out of place here. Mixing the Louisiana river traders with French Army ex-patriots is a weird bit of psudo-history, made even more weird by the unlikely addition of the Kentucky Regiment that Wayne and Hardy are part of.
DUKE is still DUKE, and Hardy is fun, but otherwise this overblown costume drama is not very memorable.
The print Artisan used for the DVD transfer is pretty poor, too. For DUKE or Hardy completists, only.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 8, 1998
Format: VHS Tape
The Fighting Kentuckian is a frontier classic that's a perfect John Wayne vehicle. Its the type of picture that I would stay up till one am to see when I was a boy in the early 60's. The old style marching, singing, and fighting is a fine escape for its duration. Not realistic and all old time Hollywood I would recomend it to anyone just for the fun of it.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Robert E. Nylund on February 16, 2006
Format: DVD
For the first and only time, John Wayne appeared in a film with Oliver Hardy of Laurel and Hardy fame, in the 1949 Republic production "The Fighting Kentuckian." Laurel and Hardy had actually made their final American film, "The Bullfighters," and were "at liberty." By this time the comic team was frequently touring Europe and making live stage appearances, where they presented some new comic routines that were, unfortunately, never filmed. They would eventually make one more film, in France: "Utopia," also known as "Atoll K."

John Wayne had a long-term contract with Republic pictures and, despite Wayne's increasing creative freedom, studio boss Herbert Yates insisted that Wayne use Vera Hruba Ralston in this historical comedy/drama. Ralston had been a Czech ice skater who had fled her homeland when the Nazis came to power; she was beautiful and charming, as the film shows, and Yates fell in love with her, eventually marrying her. Yates also insisted in putting Ralston in several of John Wayne's films at Republic. Unfortunately, Ralston had a heavy accent. This wasn't such a problem in this film because she was playing a member of the French aristocracy who was living with her countrymen in the southern United States in the early nineteenth century. They had fled France following the final defeat of Napoleon at Waterloo.

The film has many of the classic elements of John Wayne's action films and is generally delightful. There are some memorable battle sequences and Wayne's heroic efforts to help the relocated French in dealing with treacherous enemies. But the real bonus of this film is watching the great Oliver Hardy, who works so well as John Wayne's sidekick.

Loyal fans of both John Wayne and Oliver Hardy have often enjoyed this film and those who haven't seen it will want to see the rare teaming of Wayne and Hardy in a very enjoyable film.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Jan Peczkis on June 15, 2008
Format: DVD
John Wayne is well known for his westerns. The setting of this 1949 flick is Alabama, involving men who came from Kentucky. So this is technically an "eastern". The scenes are apt for the early 1800's: Soldiers are still using flintlocks, Alabama is about to be admitted to the Union as a state, and there is a large group of French citizens exiled after Napoleon's ignominious defeats.

John Breen (John Wayne) falls in love with a French woman. Trouble is, she is already earmarked for an arranged marriage to another man. A love triangle develops. Breen is determined to marry her. But he adds to the problems by pretending that he is a surveyor. He also finds out that there is a scheme afoot to defraud the French of some of their property by moving the posts that define the boundaries of the property.

This flick is more than a love story. It pushes the American way over the then-European way. The American way is progressive and the European way is traditional. In the American way, women marry whomever they love and whomever they choose to marry. In the then-European way, women married according to arranged marriages. These were usually based on social class, the wealth of the suitor, and the professional connections of the suitor with the father of the bride. The bride's wishes counted for little.
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Fighting Kentuckian
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Price: $19.95 $12.58
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