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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
on January 19, 2012
Verified Purchase
When I set out to buy a mechanical keyboard, I was just going to buy a Razer BlackWidow Ultimate. But after reading several reviews and realizing how low quality of a keyboard it was I started to look around on Amazon for a better deal (because I had Amazon gift card money).

Eventually, I decided on either a Filco or Ducky board. The main reason I wanted a tenkeyless with either white LED's or no back lighting (Ducky has this), no lettering on the keys, and a tenkeyless with Red Switches. After visiting Fry's where I tried a Black, a Red, and a Blue, I quickly changed my mind on the type of key I wanted. I just loved the bump AND click that the blue's offered. Honestly, I feel like the Blue offers a more enjoyable typing experience. Have no doubt though, the Blue's are loud.

Pros:
1: Blue Switches - More enjoyable typing experience. I don't have any trouble double taping with the blues like I've read some people have. I believe this is because I don't bottom out and because of this fact, I will probably buy a black switch over a red, if I ever wanted a "better" gaming switch.
2: Tenkeyless - The tenkeyless offers a more ergonomic setup (less travel distant from the keys to the mouse). Obviously, if you need a numpad, you should buy a full keyboard.

Cons:
1: No removable USB Cable. - As a tenkeyless, I imagine you'd pick this up if you wanted to move it around or you simply don't need the numpad and like having your mouse closer to your keyboard. With a keyboard that is rated to last 10 times the lifespan of a rubber dome, you would think Filco would set these up with a removable USB which is easier to replace (you can replace this style of cable, but it requires soldering?). Just take good care of the cable :D.
2: PINGS!! Oh my god, I didn't think this applied to every Filco board. The real sound of this board with blue switches is... Click-Clack-ping.

Other thoughts: I wish I had bought a mechanical keyboard sooner!

On the shipping: I ordered 1 day shipping (paid $21 for it), and received the board 6 days later. Of course I received a refund for the shipping, but still.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
on July 30, 2013
Verified Purchase
This is my first mechanical keyboard purchase and I have researched a ton before making a decision. I checked numerous subreddits on Reddit and lurked on geekhack, and the Filco were raved upon. Luckily, they were also available on Amazon!

The important thing to note is that this keyboard is a Blue Switch MX Cherry (something that Amazon did not put in the title), so those who do not like a bit of noise in their typing should stay away from this product. I did not know what to expect from this keyboard, but it was not as bad as I thought. Heck, my computer is noisier than the keyboard at times. The tactile response is great when you pick up momentum and you train of thought continues with your typing. I do not know if it's a placebo, but I feel that my coding and writing has improved upon purchasing a mechanical keyboard.

But why purchase the Filco? Why not a CM Storm QuickFire Stealth - Compact Mechanical Gaming Keyboard with CHERRY MX BLUE Switches and Covert Keycaps? Well, upon inspection on Youtube, a kind youtuber dismantled both the Filco and the Cooler Master and the results were astounding. Sure, the material is similar but the soldering job is extremely messy on the CM compared to the Filco. The Filco is elegant even to the PCB board. That is what you are getting at a premium, knowing that your keyboard was assembled perfectly.

There are cons with the Filco however. The USB cord is nondetachable unlike its competitors, the Ducky and the WASD. Just something to keep in mind. The cord isn't as long as I wanted either, it measures 60", ~152 cm. My old keyboard was a Microsoft sidewinder that measured 72". I doubt this would make much of a difference for people who places their desktop on the table rather than on the floor.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on September 6, 2013
Verified Purchase
First off, I'm reviewing the Ninja Majestouch-2, Tenkeyless "Click Action", which entirely use Cherry MX Blues. This means they have an audible click and a tactile feel when they actuate at 60cN (about 61 grams or 2.1 ounces) of direct pressure. If you need to know more about the switches and how they work, do a quick search on whatever engine you prefer or buy some samples from WASD Keyboards and feel them out for yourself. Think a kit is somewhere like $15. Not bad to figure out which switches are for you, instead of dropping $80-160 on a quality mechanical keyboard only to find out you don't like the switches. Most gamers will like the "speed" and relatively quieter reds or blacks. I hate them, but the consensus is that they are "gaming switches". Brows are a middle ground of tactile--feel the bump as it actuates, but little sound unless you are bottoming out hard while typing. Blues tend to be the loudest of the easily found switch types, and have the tactile bump of browns. Greens are beefier actuation resistance switches with the bump and click of blues. Not going to go into clears, whites and the rest as I have little experience with them. I like the blues the most because the feedback seems to make me more aware of my typing and key actuation, so I tend to type faster and more accurately. When gaming, I know the key registered before I see the visual feedback due to the sound and feel. It's just my preference, though and everyone's varies. Reminds me more of the buckling spring switches from back in the day. One of the good points of mechanical keyboards--options for just about everyone.

I digress...to the review!

I borrowed my friend's Filco "Tactile" (MX Browns) Tenkeyless to see why he spent $150+ on a keyboard that had no features and not even a numpad. I was currently using a Logitech G19, which are pretty pricey but have an extremely long list of features. And an LCD screen. And millions of color options for backlighting. Filcos do not come standard with any of this. Not even dedicated media buttons or volume controls. They are just keyboards, and this model doesn't even have a numpad.

So why did I buy it? After a week I found that I was typing faster and more accurately, I had all but stopped using the numpad and had become faster using 8 fingers for numbers instead of 3 on the numpad, realized that without the numpad my mouse was more ergonomically aligned and my desk space was more efficient. I didn't miss a single one of the bells and whistles of my G19. Even the volume controls. I had quickly learned all the hotkeys and shortcuts for most of my programs/games that I would have to use without the extra buttons and features, and was faster it without them.

The biggest difference was when I went back to the old rubber-dome topped light-show that was formerly my favorite gaming toy. It felt cheap. It was $30 more than the filco, but it felt cheaper by far. It wasn't nearly as sturdy (Filco's feel like they could be used to break down a door, exceptionally solid and a little heavy). The Filco never budged while typing or resetting my hand position after grabbing paperwork. The G19 is made of plastic and it felt very flimsy after using the steel back-plated Filco. The G19's keys felt squishy and likely to fail. It felt huge, bulky, gimmicky and why did I need back-lights? I know where the keys are. When using the filco, I pretty much didn't look down at all. I just knew that everything is where it was supposed to be, and there was never a need to check my work. I only had 87 keys to keep track of--only regularly use 70 or so. I think the G19 has 136. I soon realized that I preferred the essentials. Though my typing did retain it's accuracy, I did lose some speed without the mechanical switches.

This was a few years ago. I finally ponied up and dropped some dough on the last keyboard I may actually need. Mechanical keyboard switches are rated up to 50 million keystrokes each. Rubber dome are 1-5 million keystrokes.

All in all, I'd say Filco's are expensive, but justifiably so. They are made to last, and sacrifice bells and whistles for reliability and ergonomics. I've had mine for 2 months. I gave my wife my flashy other keyboard. She prefers the soft-feel of the rubber domes and how quiet they are, but thinks the LCD screen and extra keys are silly. Now I'd say I agree with the latter.

If you know someone who has one, see if you can borrow it for a week. Try before you buy. But for me, this is the greatest keyboard made since the IBM Model M Keyboard. Which--if you're too young to have used or never had the pleasure--was a true pleasure to type on.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on May 30, 2013
Verified Purchase
I bought this keyboard after a colleague with the same retina MacBook Pro bought a Das Model S Ultimate. I knew I wanted to be able to carry my keyboard easily (should need arise) in my Briggs & Riley Travelware KBC303-4 laptop bag. It turns out the Filco fits PERFECTLY in the zipping separator (for fold flat TSA screening that does NOT require removal of laptops).

Additionally, many PC gaming enthusiasts had raved about the Filco's sturdy design. The blank "ninja" keys (legends on the front face) is a nice bit of geek cred...without impairing entry of really long / complex passwords. The keyboard is weighty (but not bothersome) for it's size and has an authoritative presence under ones's fingers during typing.

Designed in Japan and assembled in Taiwan, THIS is what is meant by Asian Quality. No subpar or slipshod workmanship to be found here. During the replacement of several tops to receive the "obligatory" blue WASD and red ESC keys, I found the subassembly to be surprisingly rigid and I was never left worrying that firmly seating the new keys in position was going to damage the keyboard. I am incredibly satisfied with this keyboard and my coworkers are also happy that I elected to install O Rings; the Cherry MX Blue keys DO have a nice sound (but it might be very distracting for people working on machines with lesser dome key actuator mechanisms.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on July 5, 2013
Verified Purchase
I have been looking for a keyboard like this for a long time. I like the smaller size as I have no need for a number pad. I like the heavy weight as it doesn't move around and I like the clicking sound it makes.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on March 4, 2013
Verified Purchase
First off i'm gonna recommend this item to a very select few who want the best 10-keyless keyboard on the market. Gaming, typing reviews anything you can do with a keyboard is now better because of this keyboard.

Definitely into this mechanical keyboard. I'm a gamer, and a pretty solid typest and I've got to say this keyboard has made both typing and gaming a heck lot easier. It's been noted by many users to increase GWAM(including myself). Also, the stands underneath the keyboard aren't generic like other keyboards. They include a durable material like rubber (probably rubber) to help grip surfaces stopping your keyboard from losing grip on your desk. This keyboard can also be configured with extra colored keys to make typing easier or just to show off to your friends.

I'll have to say though there is a con. The board didn't come with the colored keys was hoping for. That was easily remedied by my favorite sc2 website however.

Overall this board deserves a 5 star rating because even tho there weren't any extra keys of color there were black keys that came with the board incase you lost some. Plus the board came with a key puller which is very useful despite other reviews. So in summary if you're looking for a 10-keyless mech. board for whatever reason I'd Highly recommend this board. Better buy it now before they're all sold out. Here's to hoping this review helped someone out there make this purchase :D
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on August 23, 2012
Verified Purchase
This keyboard has the best feel for typing of any Cherry switch keyboard I have ever used (and I've used a lot of them). I chose the Cherry blue model instead of the Cherry brown one because I like the audible click; for me at least it helps accuracy and just makes typing more fun. The difference between a quality mechanical keyboard and the standard keyboards that most people use is night and day; they are well worth the cost.

The key (pun intended) to using these Cherry switches to their max potential is to not bottom out on the keystrokes. You only have to push the key in halfway for it to activate, so pushing it in all the way to bottom-out slows you down, causes more finger stress, and is a lot louder. If you've been typing on Cherry switches for a while ad still find that you are bottoming out on keystrokes, you really owe it to yourself to do the "o-ring mod" to your keys. The o-ring mod will make typing much quieter, reduce the travel distance after key actuation, and eliminate the hard thunk felt by your fingers. For a visual example of the mod, go to youtube and search for 'mechanical keyboard o-ring mod'.
The simplest (not cheapest) source of the o-rings is wasdkeyboards.com (on their menu go to 'products' - 'keyboard accessories' - then click the option for the o-rings). They sell o-rings with two different hardness and thickness values. My preference is the 50s, but some people like the 40s.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on July 1, 2013
Verified Purchase
After using the venerable full-size IBM Model M for years, I decided I wanted to place the mouse closer to the centerline, and so I started researching "tenkeyless" (TKL) mechanical keyboards. Reviews for the Filco Majestouch-2 TKL were mostly positive and I liked the design. However, several reviews mentioned that the legends on the conventional keycaps were prone to wear, and so I bought the "Ninja" model with the legends printed on the front of the keycaps. Because I wanted both tactile and auditory feedback, I also went with the Cherry Blue key switches. For comparison, I bought a Ducky Shine 2 TKL Chinese version with Red LED backlighting and Cherry Brown switches (tactile, but no auditory feedback -- except from "bottoming out" the keys, which I tend to do).

Compared to the IBM Model M, which is in a class by itself, both the Filco and Ducky seemed like toys. Nevertheless, the Filco and Ducky are representative of the mechanical keyboards of the present era, and the remainder of the review will compare these two.

Flco pros: Heavy, solid, compact, clean lines with no branding except a barely visible black-on-black Filco logo on the front in raised lettering. Good mechanical typing action. Level with no wobble. Stays put on the desk with or without the rubberized feet extended.

Ducky pros: About the same weight as the Filco, but slightly bigger. No branding except "Ducky" logo on "Windows" keys and spacebar. Solid typing action. Red LED backlighting makes the keycaps highly legible in low ambient lighting conditions. For a Westerner, the Chinese characters printed beneath the English legends (on the Chinese version only) give the keyboard a distinctive, exotic look.

Filco cons: Keycaps feel light and cheap, and the Ninja caps are very difficult to read. I replaced them with a set of Beige/White two-tone Cherry/Olivetti keycaps with "Italian Blue" legends. The replacement keycaps were rather expensive ($95), but they are attractive, highly legible, and slightly heavier than the originals, resulting in a better sound and feel. The Filco has no frills or bells and whistles, such as LED backlighting, so if this is an important feature, you need to look elsewhere. There seems to be a tendency for spurious "g" characters to appear when actuating the "t" key with the Filco that I have not noticed with other keyboards, but this could be an artifact of poor typing skills.

Ducky cons: Keyboard was not level with or without the feet extended resulting in substantial wobble, which was worse with the feet extended. In addition, the feet are not rubberized, so that the keyboard slides on the desk. These problems were remedied by applying adhesive silicone pads to the front and sliding slitted pieces of clear plastic (Tygon) tubing to the feet to make self-leveling non-slip pads.

Overall: The Filco is a well-built business-like keyboard that is good but not great; its value could be enhanced by fitting it with higher quality keycaps. If you want extras such as LED backlighting, this can be found in various other brands, such as the Ducky Shine 2 TKL, which appears to have somewhat lower build quality than the Filco. However, as a fomer user of the IBM Model M, if I can find an IBM Space Saving keyboard (the IBM version of a TKL keyboard), I might opt for that or look at the new compact ("mini" or "60%") designs, such as the Leopold FC660C, Filco Minila, Poker II, or Ducky Mini.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on May 22, 2013
Verified Purchase
I actually have both the blue switch (clicky) and red switch (quiet/non-tactile) versions of this keyboard. My favorite switches are Cherry MX Blues, but they are just too loud for the office, so I use the Red keyboard there.

Both boards are outstanding. Build quality is second to none, they are heavy for their size and don't move around even on a glossy desktop. I really like the textured, matte finish, it doesn't pick up fingerprints the way the glossier keyboards (especially the DAS with its piano finish) do. The key action on both of these is perfect, everything is firm and the feedback is great. I have owned a DAS Professional and a Rosewill RK-9000, both with Blue switches, and this is just as good as either of those. I think this board might take slightly more force than the Rosewill, though that is probably just in my head since they use the same switches and identical keycaps.

The only minor complaint I have with this is the cord could be longer. At home I have a tower case under my desk and route my cables behind and under the desk to the back of the tower. There is enough length to get there, but I would have to disconnect the cable before pulling the tower out if I needed to access the back of it. Not a huge deal, but it is clearly shorter than the other mechanical keyboards I have been using recently. It's certainly not a deal breaker, if it were an issue I could always get a USB extension cable.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on October 15, 2013
Verified Purchase
Pros:
- Great feel - reminds me of the old IBM mechanical keyboards
- Great layout - has all of the keys i need. I never used the number pad or the fancy controls at the top of my logitech wave keyboard. I use the keyboard strictly for data input.
- love the sound - not too loud to my ears, nor has my wife complained, who sometimes works next to me
- the Filco wrist rest, also bought on Amazon is very comfortable and fits the keyboard nicely

Cons:
- probably not quite as comfortable hand position as my logitech wave keyboard but i'm adjusting.
- I would not order the ninja style again. i liked the concept but i find that sometimes i need to find a key quickly and it is harder with the key codes on the front of the keys (in a smaller font)
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