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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A dour, but educational, take on modern cinema
I picked this book up when it was released, as a movie fan and someone who likes reading a good critique, and I found it entertaining, well-written and a little depressing. Mr. Hoberman basically ties two narrative themes together, America post 9-11 and the mass acceptance and introduction of non-celluloid or "Digital" film. It is a little obtuse at times, quoting critics...
Published on October 3, 2012 by Ben from San Diego

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5 of 21 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Tiresome
I'm really reaching maximum fatigue with books like this unreadable mess. Rather than try to construct a coherent narrative the emphasis here is first and foremost never letting us forget for one single second how incredibly clever the author is.

Reading this is like getting stuck next to the intercontinental bore on some 14 hour flight who will not shut up the...
Published on December 22, 2012 by G. Schroeder


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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A dour, but educational, take on modern cinema, October 3, 2012
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I picked this book up when it was released, as a movie fan and someone who likes reading a good critique, and I found it entertaining, well-written and a little depressing. Mr. Hoberman basically ties two narrative themes together, America post 9-11 and the mass acceptance and introduction of non-celluloid or "Digital" film. It is a little obtuse at times, quoting critics like Marshall Mcluhan with an ease and off-handedness that assumes the reader is at least passingly familiar with them, and the theme is relentlessly negative and there are liberal bon mots sprinkled through the text(the man is clearly not a fan of either post editing or the Bush administration) that seem unnecessary but, overall, it's a great critique of cinema from the last twelve years and isn't so academic to make it unreadable for the average ignoramus(like myself).
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Decent book, not Hoberman at his best but still, January 12, 2013
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This review is from: Film After Film: (Or, What Became of 21st Century Cinema?) (Kindle Edition)
I've admired most of what Hoberman has written on films for quite some time, and bought this book with big expectations.

I do not think that the thoughts Hoberman offers on the fate of 21st Century Cinema, with respect to its fate in the previous century, are among his best; I think Hoberman is better off when he focuses on a certain number of films, and writes as a film critic more than a film theorist, still, it was a pleasurable read for a film fan.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A book to read and savor - as a great meal or a great film., December 9, 2013
I have the book, and to me, it's an excellent, deep and poetically insightful study of how movies have become digital, and thus, no longer of the camera's reality, but by digital manipulation made.

Several film sites review "Film After Film"... One of the best is:

[...]

(I hope linking to that review is allowed. avclub.com is a cool movie and book review site, and their review, by John Semley there, does a fine job of professionally discussing J. Hoberman's book.)

Like most of Hoberman's writing, this book is more poetic and deeply developed than say, Denby or Thomson, but that's because he's a historian, a professor of film, and a social scholar as well as a film reviewer. He recently co-wrote a catalog for the Whitney Museum of American Art with curator Jay Sanders, and has written on the Jewish theatre in New York CIty. So his writing is not breezy, although often is anecdotal and joyous, the way I find a favorite film book of mine, City of Nets: A Portrait of Hollywood in the 1940's by Otto Friedrich. Another book I highly recommend.

Hoberman's book is perhaps a double-feature for City of Nets, as it takes New York City from say 1999 to 2012, with the shock and horrors of the Twin Towers falling as the end of film (my condensation). He says in his preface, which outlines his intentions with the book:

"No less than Titanic or The Lord of the RIngs trilogy or the saga of Harry Potter (and actually, a good deal more so,) the events of 9/11 were a show of cinematic might.
This is not to say that twentieth-century cinema no longer exists - even ninteenth-century cinema is with us still. But the digital turn, accompanied by a free-floating anxiety regarding the change in cinema's essential nature and a cataclysmic jolt out of the clear blue sky that, for the vast majority of the world's population, was apprehended as a manmade cinematic event, all have combined - perhaps conspired- to create something new. That new thing is the subject of this book."
and
" As already noted, one impetus for Film After Film came from a series of university courses I taught on the nature of twenty-first century cinema. This book is very much intended as a resource, if not a text, for similar courses."

He notes that most of the films he discusses are readily available, and thus this book is the springboard for enjoying films either seen, or unseen by the reader. For example, Cloverdale, or A History of Violence. Or less known by the general public, Russian Ark or In Praise of Love, or Avalon by Mamoru Oshii. Battle in Heaven, or Hunger.

This quick review can't display the deep poetry (or call it wit, I call it poetry) of many of Hoberman's sentences. He's a creative writer, with nearly a hundred articles and reviews archived on the Village Voice website.

This is a very meaty book, filled with stories, ideas and insights that a true film intellectual will relish. It's dense, but so are the books of many great thinkers. It just so happens, J.Hoberman is a great thinker about film and culture.

If you like film and enjoy reading profound ideas clustered by a historian and incisive critic, yet always a lover of the medium, you'll learn much from, and enjoy Film After Film.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fast shipping, great book!, December 30, 2012
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This book is a great history of film in the early 2000s and beyond, great essay and point of view, highly recommend it.
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4.0 out of 5 stars A must, September 28, 2014
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A must for serious film buffs. Hoberman wrote for the Village Voice when it meant something
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5 of 21 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Tiresome, December 22, 2012
By 
I'm really reaching maximum fatigue with books like this unreadable mess. Rather than try to construct a coherent narrative the emphasis here is first and foremost never letting us forget for one single second how incredibly clever the author is.

Reading this is like getting stuck next to the intercontinental bore on some 14 hour flight who will not shut up the whole time.
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