Filmworks XIII

September 24, 2002 | Format: MP3

$9.49
Also available in CD Format
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
4:39
30
2
4:23
30
3
4:15
30
4
4:10
30
5
3:40
30
6
4:10
30
7
1:44
30
8
4:16
30
9
3:16
30
10
2:47
30
11
1:59
30
12
2:15
30
13
3:44
30
14
2:57
30
15
1:40
30
16
2:51
30
17
3:09
30
18
1:36


Product Details

  • Original Release Date: September 24, 2002
  • Label: Tzadik
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B000S5EGCK
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #109,007 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 23, 2002
Format: Audio CD
This film score is for just one film (as opposed to so many of these film work discs which feature cuts from a few films). In addition, all cuts feature just one band with no cutting back and forth between innumerable styles of music, and groups. What transpires is not just well-crafted music played exceedingly well - that is typical of Zorn outings (and expected!) - but a band gelling to create some very inspired music. Regulars Ribot, Friedlander, Cohen, and Wolleson join forces with Rob Burger on accordion to create some well textured tunes that tackle a variety of settings, but carries an overall theme and coherence. It's great stuff. Will definitely draw the listener in - even newbies to Zorn.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By SPM on August 22, 2003
Format: Audio CD
John Zorn wrote about ten songs for this movie, then he wrote a few more arrangements for each one. It takes a while before you notice the repetition. "Getting Suicidal," for example, is a guitar version of "Suicide Blues."
"Suicide Waltz," "The Suicide Kid," "Lonely Are the Dumb," and "Bugsy's Jazztet" are all the same song in different arrangements - accordion-led jazz ensemble, cello-led jazz ensemble, "country" guitar, and rock/jazz fusion (respectively).
This approach unifies the feel of the album without giving you the impression that you're hearing the same thing over and over. It helps that the musicians play so well --- rather than approach each new arrangement as an alternate take, they play like it's a whole new song. It's an amazing thing to hear.
Even if you're not into Zorn, you'll love this.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Michael Stack VINE VOICE on May 2, 2005
Format: Audio CD
John Zorn's soundtrack to "Invitation to a Suicide" is a unique, multilayered, and brilliant piece within his catalog. As the movie is (evidentally, I've not seen) a black comedy, Zorn has done his best to match the mood by composing a soundtrack of haunting, yet almost bouncy pieces, reprising themes repeatedly and allowing his band (Marc Ribot- guitar, Rob Burger- accordian, Erik Friedlander- cello, Trevor Dunn- bass, Kenny Wolleson- vibes, marimba, drums), in particular Ribot, to really stretch. One thing that Zorn historically excels at is getting the best possible performance out of his musicians, and this one is no exception. Zorn as a composer this time makes subtle reference to horror soundtracks, Morricone, and Sonny Rollins amongst others in this fantastic record. Between these touchstones and the endless reprising of themes on the record, the music develops a familiar and somewhat timeless quality.

Nowhere is this more apparent than in the main theme, dark and haunting, building layer upon layer with superb interplay between the cello (as lead voice) and the other instruments. Zorn has captured from what I'd read the intended feel of the movie and reprises the theme several times, with subtle differences in mood and feel.

But this is a record of musicians performing to their peak, with many fantastic moments, in particular from Ribot-- his soloing on such pieces as "Shifting Sands", "Suicide Blues Part 1", and "Lonely Are the Dumb" is nothing short of stunning. This shouldn't discount great playing from Friedlander ("The Suicide Kid"), Burger ("Suicide Waltz") or the others in the band, the great performances throughout are what makes this record stand out.

If you're curious about Zorn as soundtrack composer, this is probably a great place to start. Recommended.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By T. Klaase on July 21, 2003
Format: Audio CD
This is a good place as any to start with a Filmworks release if need be. The musicians, the performances, the recordings, and the compositions are all stellar. Good stuff. Much better than Filmworks 14 thats certain. Skip that one, please...
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5 of 8 people found the following review helpful By PH-50-NC on July 22, 2003
Format: Audio CD
Zorn writes in the liner notes that this session was a 'pivotal moment.' He compares it to the other highpoints of his career.
At first, I wasn't feeling it. Track one treats one of the main themes in a repetitive manner, and to me it was more Penguin Cafe Orchestra-repetitive than Steve Reich-goosebumps-inducing repetitive. In fact, track one may be my least favorite track on this very good album (though I like it more now that I've placed it at the end of the program).
So I let it sit for awhile, then came back to it to see if I would hear it any different. I rearranged the track order (the better part of an hour, trial-and-error), and now I love it. I'll only add that Ribot is understated and most excellent as always, and my track order probably reflects my Ribot jones to a certain extent. I agree with the comments of the earlier reviewer, that the unity of players, instrumentation, and to an extent, style (there is enough variation to keep things interesting, but this is definitely not jump-cutting music a la Naked City) make this a pretty outstanding disc.
The track order I settled upon is this: 3, 8, 6, 10, 5, 13, 2, 11, 17, 16, 15, 14, 12, 9, 4, 18, 7, 1. I also put a little more silence between the tracks to give them some breathing room.
Yes, I am a music nerd.
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