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24 of 27 people found the following review helpful
on March 26, 2008
Final Fantasy XII is a magnificent game. I have been a fan of the series since the very beginning, but recently I have become disappointed with recent games until I played the latest installment.

The artwork is fantastic! Rich Desert landscapes, misty woodlands, ruin-filled caves, floating mines, prison dungeons, exotic palaces, and majestic cities create a vibrant and compelling world to explore. The Near-eastern influence to the architecture enhances the exotic and mystical senses while exploring this new world. There is certainly a good reason Square Enix can be proud of their record for high quality game art.

For reasons unknown to me, some critics dislike the new battle system, I say it is the shining glory of the game. The battle system parallels that of a MMORPG. There are no random enemy encounters or separate screens for battles. Battles take place in real time. The really amazing part of the battles is how Square Enix was able to include the strategic precision of a turn-based, tactical RPG, like Final Fantasy Tactics, in real-time action through the Gambit System. In the Gambit System, the player assigns a list of prioritized, conditional actions for party members to take. This allows the player to control 3 active party members in a real-time battle, assign specific roles, and enjoy leveling more than the story completion. This is the first RPG I have played where the gameplay and battle was so compelling it distracted me from pursuing the story on my first play through the game.

The lowest point of FFXII however, IS the story. It is by no means a total wash. The Characters are likable, interesting and engaging. The plot and presentation are all fine, but the story development and character interaction loses its flavor just past the half-way mark. The ending leaves you wanting more of an ending and feeling like the script was hastily and clumsily tied up instead of drawing to any meaningful conclusions. This is the same disappointment I've had with several of the Final Fantasy Installments since FFVIII. Instead of a glorious finale, it feels like mowing over a plateau. The effects and cinematic sequences are very high quality, but the character stories feel incomplete.

Overall, I highly recommend this game. Not everyone is a harsh story critic like I am. The art, world, and battle system are so compelling, that you will play over and over and still want more.
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16 of 18 people found the following review helpful
on October 9, 2008
My first final fantasy experience came with the release of final fantasy VII and even then I didn't play it until it came in the playstation greateset hits version. I have played all the final fantasy's up to this one and was left with a feeling that the game was missing something. I enjoyed everything about this game and the story a lot but the lack of a love interest for the main character really left me unconnected to Vaan. So here is my review....

Combat System: I absolutely loved this system as it made the enemy encounters very fun and I was not annoyed to get into fights with everything on the screen. I've played to many "western" rpg's now and the idea of random battles now annoys me. So seeing your enemy on the screen and being able to avoid them if you want is very nice. A lot of the reviews complain about the gambit system in boss battles because of micro-managing. Well, I personally like to take more control over the battles when fighting a boss, I mean lets face it, if I'm fighting a boss and I don't have to do anything then there is no fun in it for me. You can still leave a few gambits active and if you take the time you can set up some that will aid you in your fight so you don't have to worry about them. I kept protectra, shellra, float and float on gambits during the whole game after I acquired them. Also, when you run around in the game you slowly gain your mp back so there is little need for resting and elixers unless you're in a crazy boss battle.

Storyline: I thought the storlyine was a nice change in the mix of things and instead of being a little out there it was a nice subtle story. It comes down to your group of characters stopping an evil force but instead of saving the world its more of them just saving their country. I was dissapointed in the lack of a love story between the main hero and heroine. That detatched me a lot from the main character and made him feel like just another party memeber in the group. My favorite characters were Ashe, Fran and Balthier and I cared very little about Vaan. On the bright side I liked the fact that he wasn't whiny and annoying half the time (Cloud and Squall).

Jobs: Maybe I'm to old school but I really do miss the preset job system of the earlier years. I missed the mages and warrior classes of yesteryear. I did not like final fantasy X's and I don't like final fantasy XII's lack of job system. Truthfully only final fantasy IX's (not using XI because its an mmorpg and you can still make your character do any job) job system has appealed to me since VII. The fact that any character can do any job makes them less important in the group and you can if you want only use three characters to go through the whole game. It makes it very hard to keep leveling up the other characters when you seem to be doing the exact same thing for every character. Yes, in the begining of the game you do focus on who is going to use magic and who is going to be a hitter but halfway through the game that all goes away and any character can now be a warrior or mage which takes out some of the tactical fighting in the game itself.

Characters: Like mentioned before I cared very little for Vaan and also Panelo. I leaned more towards Ashe, Fran and Bashe more than Vaan and Panelo (I don't even think Panelo has a backstory in the game) which is sad because in a game where you're introduced to who will be the main charater is, you want to like that person and have a feeling of some sort of attatchment to them. Without a love story or a really good background on Vaan I thought Ashe was more the main character and Vaan was just another party member.

Side quests: Man, there are a ton of side quests which can make putting in over 100 hours easy in this game. They have a "hunt" quest, which you go to taverns all around the world where people have posted up flyers looking for someone to kill these monsters. Its a good way to get items and money and highly recommended to do so in the game. Some of them are really easy while others are extremely hard. You also get to join a hunter's guild and the more hunts you do the more renown you will get plus after so many the guild leader pays you extra for killing stuff not included in the hunts. Like the first demon wall for example, I didn't know that the leader would know about or care about it but you get some money for killing it. I was an extremely low level when I fought it and spent a whole Saturday just trying to kill it, I could've leveled up and then beat it but it was much more fun and challenging to try to beat it at a level I wasn't supposed to. Like I said there are tons of sidequests in the game to keep you going and most of them are fun.

Bonus Disc: I was very dissapointed in the bonus disc, it seemed like it was just thrown together with little care. The history of the final fantsy series is summed up in less than 15 minutes and the interviews seemed boring to me. I did enjoy the art gallery but I would've liked to have seen more. The metal case was alright but wasn't that big of deal. So if you haven't bought this game and are planning on it, just save the 10 or so extra dollars and buy the regular one.

The game itself is an overall enjoyment to play and with the many side quests keeps you very busy during the whole game. I think the main fault is the lack of story for Vaan who is, and is easily forgotten, the main character in the game. The lack of a love interest and the ending of the game was a grave dissapointment. The graphics and the detailed characters and fun fighting system make this game well worth playing. The bonus disc was a waste but if you want it that bad buy it. I give this final fantasy a 4 out of what should have been an easy 5.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
VINE VOICEon January 17, 2012
Note: This review is long

When I first reviewed Final Fantasy XII in 2006, I gave the game a glowing review. I had, upon first playing it, fallen in love in a way. It was something "different," (in a manner of speaking) and it seemed to be striving for something. In 2012 I went back to Final Fantasy XII to see how I would like it six years later. And while I enjoy it very much, there were some parts that looked like they had aged well, while other aspects actually stand out more. In particular, I rather like Final Fantasy XII a great deal to this day. It is not the best Final Fantasy by far, but it is one that has a "love it" or "hate it" relationship for a reason. We'll talk about that here.

Final Fantasy XII is a very different story from other Final Fantasy games in the series. Rather than eventually setting you on a quest that saves the entire world, it stays local, with the idea that the world is at stake... but never really showing you that it is. Final Fantasy XII takes place in the world of Ivalice. In particular a small country called Dalmasca, which is caught in the middle of the war between Rozaria and Archadia. The Archadian Empire is the greater of two evils here as they've occupied Dalmasca, and a noble named Vayne hopes to use a powerful stone called Nethicite to win the war. The characters you control are not happy about the occupation and decide they want their freedom and begin to fight for it, only to discover there might be something more. The problem with that "something" more is that it doesn't really show up until the end of the game. Does Final Fantasy XII have a good story? Mostly. The writing and world of Ivalice is as sharp as ever. Though much of what you learn is done so by reading up on the areas you visit and gleaming info about them.

There are two things that make the story such a letdown for so many fans. The first is simple: It's not about the characters at all. And it's something just about any fan can sympathize with. The story is about Dalmasca and Ivalice. Your characters don't have much they themselves are fighting for. Their motives are, at times, paper thin. Despite starting out to avenge his brother, Vaan eventually takes a backseat. He simply ends up being there for the ride. Penelo, on the other hand, just seems to tag along because Vaan is going. The only character that seems to really have motive is Ashe, who must reclaim her kingdom. Even Balthier, the most likable character in the cast, doesn't have clear motives. The second thing is that at some point the story just comes to a stand still. It starts off great, especially thanks to the dialog. But at some point in the middle the story seems to go nowhere, instead sending us to various locations to retrieve various items. The story picks up again near the end and makes some of it rewarding. It's getting there that is likely to drive players mad. There's a lot of politics, but not a lot of actual action until that point. And even then, Final Fantasy XII's main antagonist is no where near as interesting as his subordinate. In the end the story is rewarding, it's getting to that end point that is likely to drive you mad.

Final Fantasy XII's game play, however, is quite unique. At least for a long time. It's hard to judge it. Instead of there being random encounters all your enemies are out in the open and able for you to attack without any sort of transition. You'll target enemies and begin to engage them. You can set up your characters via gambits to take on any enemy you wish.

The game's Gambit system is perfectly fine. It is really well constructed and allows for meticulous play. As you begin the game you'll be able to set specific gambits to specific actions. Such as telling characters to attack or to heal. As the game goes on you'll be able to acquire more gambits and set more actions. You can also be extremely meticulous with it by assigning certain gambits to act in specific instances. For instance you could set a character to cast Esuna any time they are inflicted with a status ailment. Or you could set characters to cast a cure spell any time a character is below 50% HP. It can be done down to a tee such as telling a character to only cast a specific spell on enemies at a specific number of HP. You can also prioritize the gambits to make sure that characters do one thing before another. You might assign a Phoenix down to be used any time a character gets KO'd in the first slot, and enemy attack in the second. This would mean that character would attack until an ally is KO'd and then he'd use a Phoenix Down. It's complex at first, but once you actually learn the system you'll find it's relatively easy to take advantage of. And when you do it is actually amazing how easy Final Fantasy XII can be. On the other hand, the learning curve takes a bit of time. If you don't understand the gambit system, Final Fantasy XII can be unbelievably difficult. When you do, however, the customization and how you play around with it can be endless.

The other aspect is the license grid. And at first I was amused by it, but the License Board has a BIG downfall far later in the game. At first the License Board seems terrible. As you battle you not only obtain experience points, but also license points. And when you get these you spend them on the License Board. The License Board is how you'll use abilities, spells and even equipment. Yes, equipment. You'll buy weapons and armor, but without the proper license you can't equip them. At first this seems odd, but the game paces well enough that most times you'll uncover the right license as new equipment becomes available. What really makes the License Grid annoying, though, is that characters don't have their own unique board with their own unique abilities. It's all the same board. Eventually (without enough patience) every character will be the same. There is no real incentive to use one character over another. They'll all be the same. The only thing that might give them some difference is their quickenings. Each character learns different quickenings in battle. But these abilities are, at times, so ruthlessly overpowered (not to mention you can chain them) that they make a game that may have otherwise provided challenge nearly a cakewalk once every character has all of them.

It can be interesting to play Final Fantasy XII. Especially given just how much game there truly is. There are tons of side quests. Many that open up from the get go. There's a hunting sidequest that last virtually the entire game, tons of optional bosses and areas to explore (some of which can be used as shortcuts to other areas) as well as hidden Espers (summons) and bosses in areas you've already visited. No matter how you slice it there is a ton of stuff to do in Final Fantasy XII and it also has tons of throwbacks to previous Final Fantasy games (in particular the optional battle with Gilgamesh is apt to make long time Final Fantasy fans smile). This all boils down to a big game with a lot to do... if you decide to do it.

There is one small tiff with Final Fantasy XII's battle system. Since gambits can be automated to characters, you can virtually set them up to battle on their own. Meaning you can put the controller down and do something else. I was able to set my controller down, make a sandwich and arrive later to see my characters had defeated the game's final boss without any actual input from me. You don't HAVE to play the game this way, but it does make it that you may not want to play Final Fantasy XII for many hours at a time. As I played this time around, I didn't even rely quite so heavily on magic, as the game allows one to easily get by on almost nothing but physical attacks. You don't HAVE to use gambits at all. You can even select attacks that override what your characters are already set to do automatically. This is great it some situations where you might want to quickly cast a cure spell in the event that your characters are too slow to act, but it's hard not to admit that for some gamers this is going to take some of the fun away. The game is still fun, but like every game out there these days, once you learn the ins and outs of the system, taking advantage of it means an incredibly easy romp. At best, you'll finish Final Fantasy XII's main story in thirty hours. On the other hand, all the optional stuff can bump that up to over one hundred hours and it's hard to imagine anyone but the hardcore Final Fantasy XII player doing all of that.

In terms of graphics, Final Fantasy XII really knows how to impress. The game crunches a lot of pixels and has a huge world to explore. The art direction is fantastic, but what's better is how alive the world of Ivalice truly is. You'll find towns and cities wholly populated with tons of NPCs and various races. Each with their own culture and dialect. One thing Final Fantasy XII really does well is engross you in its world. It's absolutely beautiful. The creatures also look good. Not only that but there's a surprisingly large amount you can learn by browsing through the games various encyclopedias located right in your menu. The world of Ivalice has a pulse. You really feel like there's a history at work here. Fans of other Ivalice games (Final Fantasy Tactics, Final Fantasy Tactics Advance, Vagrant Story) will most certainly be interested here.

The game also sounds really good. The voice acting is, for the most part, magnificent. Especially in conjunction with some of the well crafted dialog. Vayne, in particular, really sounds like a politician. The soundtrack is fantastic as well. Hitoshi Sakimoto may not be enough to fill Nobuo Uematsu's shoes, but that doesn't mean he has not composed a magnificant score. Some of it sounds incredibly in tune with what you'd expect. It's just an all around good soundtrack. There are some who have complained the score is too epic for it's own good, but some tunes really compliment certain situations. The Archadian Empire theme sounds just as dominating and overbearing as you'd want it to. That's not to say every track is a gem. There are times when the music doesn't fill the emotion. In particular, character's themes just don't stick out. In fact, unless you owned the official soundtrack you wouldn't actually know any of the character's themes were actually playing. As I said before, Final Fantasy XII makes it clear that the story is not about the characters at large... and the soundtrack seems to emphasize that.

If you happened to pick up the collector's edition then there are a few things of interest, but nothing that is really worth forking over a lot of extra money for. The history of Final Fantasy, in particular, is really a letdown. The history of Final Fantasy is especially disappointing as it sounds incredibly mundane. It's just not worth forking over the extra money for the collector's edition.

Final Fantasy XII is not going to be for everyone. It is a good game its own right. And while I don't like it nearly as much as I did the first time I played it, I still enjoy it a great deal to this day. It is not the best Final Fantasy. Far from it. At the very least it does try to do something different. For those who are unaware, the team behind Final Fantasy XII was, at first, under the watch of Yasumi Matsuno, and he is usually well known for creating gameplay concepts that are "different," from what you'd always expect from a game. The result is usually mixed (Vagrant Story, anyone?) but it has sometimes earned him a great deal of respect. He was not on board for the entire project, but what you get is certainly ambitious. It won't be for everyone, but if you can get beyond Final Fantasy XII's shortcomings... there is a point where the game just clicks and it becomes a unique experience. It's at least worth a try, and once you climb beyond the hurdles it can be amusing just how well done Final Fantasy XII truly is.
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12 of 16 people found the following review helpful
Final Fantasy XII is spectacular. Adapting a form of live action gameplay first introduced in XI, FFXII still stays true to its turn based roots but with time factors, as seen initially in FFVII. The graphics are incredible and the gameplay is a lot of fun. The story is also incredibly in depth, and is jam packed with sidequests.

As far as the fighting engine, it initially seems rather lackluster, mostly because all you can do is attack. However, as the game goes on and you learn new technics, magics, summons, and mist abilities (similiar to VII's "limit breaks"), the battles become downright exciting. This is significant because it makes leveling up a less tedious, and often a fun process.

The only downside, as is the case with all modern FF's, is the voiceovers. The actors, as always, are pretty bad, but the storyline is so interesting, that it makes up for the poor performances pretty well.

The Collector's Edition is worth the extra few bucks for the flashy metal case alone, but the bonus features disk is also jampacked with art and other special features that any fanboy would be insane to pass up. And at it's $40-50 asking price, you're getting a minimum of 80 hours of gameplay, and a few extra hours of special features. It's a great deal. Go for it.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on September 14, 2009
I like it!!!! It is one of the best RPG games I have played so far. I like most the whole new battle syatem, and the combination of different moves. The world designes is unbelievablly good. Beatiful graphics and Music, voice casting. It worths to buy this collective edition with metal case. It will be part of your best memory(for me too).
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
It seems like lately, Square Enix has been milking the Final Fantasy franchise for every last penny. Ever the faithful fan though, I eagerly purchased the Collector's Edition of this title and promptly put it into my PS3 to revel in Final Fantasy goodness.

What I got was something of a disappointment. It is not that the game is bad, per se, but that you are torn with hating the playstyle and having to acknowledge that given the combat method, it is kind of necessary. The plot is great, the graphics gorgeous, but some of the hallmarks of the series are either gone entirely, or traded for new upstarts that don't quite make the cut.

What do I mean? Read on to find out.

Graphics and Sound

I may as well get the easy stuff out of the way. The graphics are gorgeous. Even without HDTV, the cinematics are detailed, vivid, and very well animated. With the beautiful water and landscape animations, you could even take some sequences as being real.

In-game animations are great, with the exception of the facial colorations and the abdomen of the main protagonist, Vaan. When trying to create the image of a six-pack for Vaan, the darker colorations make it look like he is wearing a badly done Hallowe'en costume. For the other characters, a light circle around the eyes makes it look like really bad cover-up that hasn't been worked into the rest of the makeup. If you can get past that, the animations are beautiful.

Sound, true to the Final Fantasy franchise, is epic. The opening theme song is a remake of the classic crystal melody from most previous titles. In-game music is pleasant and varied. When you are in the same area for a long time, it can get old, but not as bad as say, Pokemon music.

Story

Most previous Final Fantasy titles had a lot of character development. This title focuses more on the grand tale of a war-torn continent, involving an Empire steadily overcoming individual kingdoms. A princess in hiding is heading a rebel faction, and seeking to claim her throne, lost two years previous when a soldier in her father's guard killed her father. And the kingdom at stake is a desert kingdom called Dalmasca. Does this sound somewhat similar to the original Star Wars trilogy?

The characters themselves help to instill a lot of humor, however, the primary focus is definitely on the convoluted politics of the game. There are so many plot twists that you will quickly want a version of Cliff's Notes to try and keep it all straight. That being said, the voiceacting is spot-on, and a lot of time obviously went into developing that aspect. Lip synchronization is not half bad, at least as compared to Final Fantasy X which had some of the worst lip synchronization of any game title I can recall.

Is any of this bad? Not really, however, younger players may get confused rather quickly at all of the political subterfuge.

Controls

The control scheme is where I find myself wondering if I love or hate the game. If you have ever played an online game, the play style is essentially the same. You can see each member of your party on the overworld map, and unlike previous titles, all of the enemies are readily visible. This means there are no random encounters, and if you want to avoid a fight, it is possible.

There is a new system called "Gambits" (read: AutoPilot). Using this system, you can set "If/Then" clauses for your two other characters which you are not directly controlling. For instance, you could create a clause that states is a person's health in your party falls below 50%, that character would cast a heal spell. Since there are no more turn-based battles, the game pretty much forces you to use gambits, although you are welcome to turn them off. Be warned, that if you turn the Gambit system off, your two other players will simply stand there while you engage in combat. All this said, you can still override a gambit command for each character manually, if necessary, but still, using this system pretty much takes the control aspects most Final Fantasy players are used to out of their hands and places it firmly with the AI of the game.

The controls themselves are easy to pick up and use, for the most part. While some aspects of the schematics are a little frustrating (if a party member is being targeted, for instance, you cannot swap them out, which gets irritating), for the most part, you will get past these faults.

Balance & Other Issues

Final Fantasy has always been famous for a few things. One was the amazing spell and summon animations. On this same thread, the summons were carried game-to-game, and became a staple (Remember Ifrit or Shiva?). Now, the familiar summons are Airships with the Empire, and the new summons, called espers, seem like cheap imitations.

Another issue is the balance. Sure, this series is notorious for having optional boss fights that truly test your play capability. Think Ultimate Weapon from Final Fantasy VII. In this game, optional bosses exist, but some are insanely easy, while others will annihilate you. Okay, set aside these optional bosses. Even the in-game forced boss fights are extremely difficult at times.

In one instance, there was a fight which was a little challenging, but my party made it through ok. In another instance, not 5 minutes later, there was another fight, which completely decimated my party. Since there was no area to explore in-between, it was obviously meant for my given party level at that time. This boss was so difficult, that we had to grind (that is, run in different areas to gain levels) up 10 more levels in order to defeat it. By that time, the next few fights were so easy as to be ridiculous.

Lastly, and maybe the most frustrating, are the area imbalances. In some instances, you will travel along and fight some foes, then out of the blue a super enemy will appear, and kick your pixellated butt. The first time that this happens, you think it is the exception, but when it happens in almost every new area, you begin to wonder about the sanity quotient of the designers.

Overall

The game is still fun, and the story and music are true to the Final Fantasy series. Still, I cannot help but feel that this game isn't a Final Fantasy game, too. It looks gorgeous, the sounds are great, there are epic spells and summons, yet I still feel like I am getting a high-quality impostor. Square Enix essentially about Final Fantasy, right down to the spell names, and made small changes. When added up, you definitely notice it. Would I still recommend this title? Yes. But if you are a die-hard fan of this franchise, be warned, the beautiful lady that you see will not be as pristine once the buzz wears off.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICEon February 22, 2010
There are some games that have trouble moving forward over the years: either the type of game falls out of favor (like Adventure games did for a while) or the technology flies forward with no real way to adapt the old to the new. Worst of all, being a sequel that comes from a long line of sequels can bring massive amounts of excess baggage from the game's predecessors that can't (or won't) be jettisoned.

Having played many an RPG, I'm very pleased to say that Final Fantasy XII navigates smoothly around all these troubles. It does an excellent job of focusing on what matters most: a rich Role-Playing Game experience that is also rather easy to use. Having tried their hand at just about every variation of the genre, Square Enix gives us this culmination of lessons learned, and the end product is immersive, beautiful, and fun.

Players used to the Final Fantasy series are also accustomed to having unique and complex capabilities as far as HOW they play. If I were to start telling you about FFXII's Licenses, Gambits, Mists, and ESPers, chances are your head would spin--it's deep stuff. In earlier titles like Final Fantasy VIII this was problematic: the way you handled abilities and magical creatures who help you and special boosts to your weapons and stats was complicated and hard to keep track of. Here however we have a smooth flow that slowly introduces you to the concepts and gives you a chance to try each one as you progress in the game. Gameplay elements are better organized and not as dependent on each other.

Perhaps one of the best features in the game is "Gambits": instead of manually managing every character's every action in every turn, you can apply a certain amount of intelligence to your characters using multiple rules that you create. This can easily be done. For example, you can have your healer heal anyone when their health falls below 40%. You can have a party member choose to attack the nearest enemies, or to focus on whichever enemy the leader is attacking. You can tell a magic using character to throw certain spells based on certain events. You can organize the Gambits to better automate actions: "attack whatever the party leader is attacking. Failing that, just attack the nearest enemy." And with one tap of a button, you can override these behaviors at any time.

Another excellent feature is Licenses. They represent a grid of all the possible skills a character can have, and they give you a seemingly infinite depth of choices for each player: no longer do you have to choose narrow character types, like "Mage", "Fighter", "Healer". Instead you simply choose how to spend points you accumulate to pick skills, spells, and equipment for each. Naturally, this makes character mistakes easy to remedy, and it also means replaying the game can be a very different experience every time.

There are other exciting features to the gameplay that would easily double the size of this review...so let's move on to the game elements themselves. Probably the only real limitation to this game is that it was crafted for the PlayStation 2. Cutscenes are stunningly gorgeous, but while the in-game graphics are among the best the PS2 had to offer, this still means things look a bit blocky, edges jagged and detail a bit muddied. When you play, you will face loading screens that transition you from one area to another, but thankfully Square occasionally fills the gaps a bit with cinematic-style transition scenes. Moving through the story brings characters who come and go: some are guests you have no control over. Others join with you and become playable characters you can control. You even have allies who may change sides, and the next thing you know you're battling your own comerades in the fight to save the world. My only complaint in this area is that you are only allowed to take 3 of your characters "out of the box" at a time. You can change back and forth any time you like, even swapping out KO'd characters for live ones, but it would be a bit more fun for me if I could have 4 characters under my control instead of 3.

Things don't stop there: while we have gorgeous artwork, a beautifully orchestrated score, rich gameplay, and a complex system with an easy learning curve, we get the rest of the package, too: great writing. Interesting characters with diverse backgrounds, storylines that peg the dramatic moments and bring you along on the highs and lows of the story, drawing you in to a deep and at times very complicated plot. There are political alliances and shadow arrangments, with people shifting sides as the story goes along.

If you're interested in the Final Fantasy series, Final Fantasy XII is about as good as the later titles get. If you're already familiar with the series from earlier titles, you might be pleasantly surprised at the amount of polish that has been put on this title. If you're completely new to the RPG genre, expect this to be fairly complicated: read the manual closely, pay attention to tutorials, and do a little reading online to immerse yourself. I doubt you'll be disappointed. The collector's edition is sharply more expensive than the standard game, and for that you get a disc of extras. Unless you're a completist (or can find a lower price), chances are you'll be happy with the standard version of this title.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on November 9, 2011
Square Enix has once again created a series that is fun, fast paced, and addictive.

With the King dead, betrayed by his loyal solider, the Kingdom faces its most trying time yet. Enter Vaan, this young man dreams of being a sky pirate and living life free of care and trouble however fate has other plans for him and his friends.

Final Fantasy 12 offers the gamer an experience until many others:
Explore a huge world full of unique races, people, and monsters.
Enjoy countless side quest and attempt to collect all the peices for the ulimate weapon!
Choose who you want to be! Each player comes available to customize and master.
Relax to yet another wonderful musical masterpiece.
Enjoy perhaps a Final Fantasy first as you learn of the political background of the world.

Another instant classic that will not disappoint the true FF fan!

The collectors Edition comes with a beautiful Metal Case to keep your game safe for years to come!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on October 25, 2011
Great game, mostly interesting characters, only downside is that there is, to me, a very obvious A team and B squad. The battle system takes a bit of getting used to but it works ok. The system for controlling ally actions generally works well but if your settings are wrong for a hard fight it can make it much harder than it needs to be. Yes the game can play itself if you set it up right, but it's an optional system and you can use it as much as you want. It's possible to beat the main plot line without any real time spent just raising your levels but there is a nice extended post game to keep you challenged as you continue to put on levels. Initially scarce resources force you to think about what you need for equipment vs buying 3 of everything at each new shop and the license board system prevents game breaking jumps in equipment.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on January 2, 2012
This FF game is the first ive played but after i played it for a long time, i tried the 2nd and 3rd on SNES and 7 on ps2 they were nothing compared to this one and here's why(In my opinion) this game is a very simple,complex,epic,adventure and hard all in one, the constant encounter's with enemy's like in the previous game's was addictive for me as well as the various monster's you encounter from common to rare is a blast, the effects the graphics are still eye popping even today the voice's and sound effect's were great, now onto grinding which is 90% of the time, is taken to another level with chain killing the same type of monster for some unique item's or just for fun and of course EXP, easy to handle in combat easy to play when you got the right flow, buy it and expect True Entertainment and the best RPG on the ps2.
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