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Final Passages: The Intercolonial Slave Trade of British America, 1619-1807 (Published for the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture, Williamsburg, Virginia) Hardcover – September 2, 2014


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Final Passages: The Intercolonial Slave Trade of British America, 1619-1807 (Published for the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture, Williamsburg, Virginia) + The Half Has Never Been Told: Slavery and the Making of American Capitalism
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Product Details

  • Series: Published for the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture, Williamsburg, Virginia
  • Hardcover: 416 pages
  • Publisher: The University of North Carolina Press; 1 edition (September 2, 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1469615347
  • ISBN-13: 978-1469615349
  • Product Dimensions: 1.5 x 6.5 x 9.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #83,515 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"By taking up the traffic in human chattel after the Middle Passage, O'Malley fundamentally transforms our understanding of the transatlantic slave trade and its consequences in the English Atlantic world ... A critical contribution to scholarship on the economics of the slave trade, and on the lived experience of its victims."--Jennifer L. Morgan, New York University

Review

Just when the idea was taking root that all perspectives on the transatlantic trade in enslaved Africans had been explored, O'Malley has opened up an entirely new field. His focus on the intercolonial movement of imported Africans illustrates that where millions of Africans ended up living their enslavement had little relation to where they entered.--Sir Hilary Beckles, University of the West Indies at Cave Hill, Barbados

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By E. Covart on October 23, 2014
Format: Hardcover
For many slaves the "Middle Passage" marked the beginning, not the end of their forced migration from Africa and their voyage into slavery. Gregory O'Malley provides the first, detailed exploration of the intercolonial slave trade, the trade that continued the process of enslavement and forced migration beyond the Middle Passage.

For many slaves, the Middle Passage ended with the arrival of their ship at a Caribbean entrepôt such as Jamaica or Barbados. Local plantation owners and merchant slave traders purchased slaves either at auction or from the transatlantic ship captain. Plantation owners tended to purchase healthy, male slaves in the prime of their lives. Slave traders often purchased the slaves the plantation owners didn’t want for transshipment to other North and South American ports, where the infrequency of slave ship arrivals made buyers less picky about the health, sex, and age of slaves. O’Malley focuses on this transshipment trade.

O’Malley sets out to prove five important points about the intercolonial slave trade:

1. The intercolonial slave trade was “robust” in scale.

2. The extensive scale of the intercolonial slave trade powerfully shaped enslaved people's experiences.

3. The intercolonial slave trade was not just incidental to the British transatlantic slave trade, but VITAL to its growth and to the growth of American slavery in general.

4. The intercolonial slave trade facilitated other branches of commerce, which entangled the profits of many traditional trades with the buying and selling of people.

5. The intercolonial slave trade influenced imperial policy. It pushed Great Britain, France, and Spain away from mercantilism and toward policies of free trade.
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By aubrey aramaki on October 12, 2014
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
a book well worth reading
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