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Financial Statements.xls: A Step-by-Step guide to Creating Financial Statements Using Microsoft Excel, Second Edition Paperback – March 1, 2005


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 314 pages
  • Publisher: Limelight Media; 2nd edition (March 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0974636843
  • ISBN-13: 978-0974636849
  • Product Dimensions: 8.7 x 7.3 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,441,376 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Joseph Rubin, CPA, principal of www.exceltip.com (a leading Excel Web site) is the author of the very successful books:
· F1 Get the Most out of Excel!
· F1 Get the Most out of Excel Formulas & Functions
· Financial Statements.xls

Joseph Rubin has over 27 years of financial experience in the accounting industry. He has served as CFO, Controller and has run his own CPA practice for many years. Joseph Rubin, CPA, is an independent consultant specializing in the development of applications using Microsoft Excel for the financial industry and has instructed thousands of professionals on Microsoft Excel.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Meryl K. Evans on April 30, 2005
The first worksheet the book references is "Worksheet 11." I open the first chapter on the CD and the page that appears matches the page in the book. But there's no mention of "11" anywhere. I click the "Page 11" tab, but it's not related. I find the worksheet list and it also references to "Worksheet 11." I recognize several worksheets in the later tabs, but not Worksheets 13 and 14. The CD and naming convention needs improvement.

The first step of changing XYZ Corporation to my company name doesn't work. I look at the CD again and click on "Financial Statements" and this time it takes me to the right place. Am I a dumb user? No. How do I put this without sounding like I have a big ego? I frequently write about technical topics and am comfortable with computers. Does that do it? Well, after switching to "Financial Statements," saving it to my hard drive to take it out of read only mode, and attempting the action again, the company name won't change.

The next set of instructions has punctuation in the wrong place, thereby confusing the reader. This simple typo leads to an incorrect entry and a frustrated reader. A field name also has a typo, missing the "s" from "Names in Workbook." That might look like small potatoes, but this is the second typo within the first four pages.

Joseph Rubin knows Excel. I don't question his expertise. The concern is with the publisher and its editing process. I've been doing technical editing and these are typical mistakes that editors should catch because drafting perfect directions throughout a technical book like this one is impossible.

Typos and incorrect steps aside, readers could learn new tricks and shortcuts as they complete tasks.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Thomas Duff HALL OF FAMETOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on April 13, 2005
I recently received a review copy of Joseph Rubin's book Financial Statements.xls - A Step-By-Step Guide To Creating Financial Statements Using Microsoft Excel. While it's has good material, it's probably best for a specific niche audience...

Chapter List: Introducing Financial Statements.xls Worksheets; Adjusting the Trial Balance; Updating the Trial Balances Data Worksheet; Balance Sheet; Income Statement; Cash Flow; Notes; Customizing the Financial Statements.xls Workbook and Presenting Information; Protecting Financial Data; Printing and Mailing Financial Statement Reports; Balance Sheet Five-Year Comparison Reports; Income Statement Five-Year and Quarterly Comparison Reports; Analyzing Financial Statements Using PivotTable and PivotChart Reports; Analyzing Financial Statements and Calculating the Ratio Analysis; Analyzing Profit Centers; Index

I've read other books by Mr. Rubin on Excel, and his style is pretty spartan. It's a "do this, do this, and do this" without a lot of background or explanation as to what's going on behind the scenes. This book is probably even more so in that style. There's a CD that contains much of the material presented in the book, so you have a starting point. He then takes you through the steps necessary to modify and add to the spreadsheets to produce your own financial statements. You won't get a lot of handholding, so if you don't understand something, you may have to keep banging your head against the wall to figure it out.

As I mentioned in the opening, this book doesn't appear to be for everyone. After going through the material, I'd feel comfortable giving it to an intermediate to advanced Excel power user who understands accounting.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By W Boudville HALL OF FAMETOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on April 10, 2005
Excel is of course a spreadsheet. But part of its success is that it can be used as an all-purpose "smart" table. So much so that a comprehensive text on Excel can easily span a thousand pages, if it seeks to fully explain all its capabilities. The irony about such a text is that the original use in making a financial statement can be obscured. Try reading one of those texts. While its author might be knowledgeable about Excel, how much accounting does she really know?

Rubin's book is a response to those texts. He is a practising accountant (CPA). He focuses on a reader who needs to write a real financial spreadsheet. And who probably does not care about loading an image into a cell, or making another cell a clickable hyperlink.

Thus the book has a very utilitarian feel about it. He has stripped down Excel, to explain only what you might plausibly need. This also makes the book far quicker to read, if you are time constrained. Perhaps the best thing about this book is that it is not really a computer book. (In the sense described above.)
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Verified Purchase
It is not too clear how to fill and use the excel spreadsheet. It is confusing. It needs more detail explanation.
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