Find Your Strongest Life and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy Used
$16.99
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Good | Details
Sold by Onlinebookshop
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Used-Good book. Normal surface & edge wear. Some markings and highlighting may be present. Used book does not include Accessories such as access code, CD/DVD etc.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Find Your Strongest Life: What the Happiest and Most Successful Women Do Differently [Audiobook][Unabridged] (Audio CD) Unknown Binding – 2009


See all 20 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Unknown Binding, 2009
$18.12 $16.99

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Holiday Deals in Books
Holiday Deals in Books
Find deals for every reader in the Holiday Deals in Books store, featuring savings of up to 50% on cookbooks, children's books, literature & fiction, and more.

Product Details

  • Unknown Binding
  • ASIN: B003L8PGHK
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (228 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #11,283,500 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

In a world where efficiency and competency rule the workplace, where do personal strengths fit in?

It's a complex question, one that intrigued Cambridge-educated Marcus Buckingham so greatly, he set out to answer it by challenging years of social theory and utilizing his nearly two decades of research experience as a Sr. Researcher at The Gallup Organization to break through the preconceptions about achievement and get to the core of what drives success.

The result of his persistence, and arguably the definitive answer to the strengths question, can be found in Buckingham's trio of best-selling books, First, Break All the Rules (coauthored with Curt Coffman, Simon & Schuster, 1999); Now, Discover Your Strengths (coauthored with Donald O. Clifton, The Free Press, 2001); and The One Thing You Need to Know (The Free Press, 2005), in which the author gives important insights to maximizing strengths, understanding the crucial differences between leadership and management, and fulfilling the quest for long-lasting personal success.

What would happen if men and women spent more than 75% of each day on the job using their strongest skills and engaged in their favorite tasks, basically doing exactly what they wanted to do?

According to Marcus Buckingham (who spent years interviewing thousands of employees at every career stage and who is widely considered one of the world's leading authorities on employee productivity and the practices of leading and managing), companies that focus on cultivating employees' strengths rather than simply improving their weaknesses stand to dramatically increase efficiency while allowing for maximum personal growth and success.

If such a theory sounds revolutionary, that's because it is. Marcus Buckingham calls it the "strengths revolution."

As he addresses more than 250,000 audiences around the globe each year, Buckingham touts this strengths revolution as the key to finding the most effective route to personal success -- and the missing link to the efficiency, competency, and success for which many companies constantly strive.

To kick-start the strengths revolution, Buckingham and Gallup developed the StrengthsFinder exam, which identifies signature themes that help employees quantify their personal strengths in the workplace and at home. Since the StrengthsFinder debuted in 2001, more than 1 million people have discovered their strengths with this useful and important tool.

In his role as author, independent consultant and speaker, Marcus Buckingham has been the subject of in-depth profiles in The New York Times, Fortune, Fast Company, Harvard Business Review, USA Today and is routinely lauded by such corporations as Toyota, Coca-Cola, Master Foods, Wells Fargo, and Disney as an invaluable resource in informing, challenging, mentoring and inspiring people to find their strengths and obtain and sustain long-lasting personal success.

Marcus Buckingham holds a master's degree in social and political science from Cambridge University and is a member of the Secretary of State's Advisory Committee on Leadership and Management. He lives with his wife and two children in Los Angeles, CA.


Amazon Author Rankbeta 

(What's this?)

Customer Reviews

The purpose of the book is to teach women how to discover and create a fulfilling life where their strengths can flourish.
Krys
I realize from what she says about her work that she hasn't thought of looking for a different job that would help her feel better.
Donald Mitchell
Marcus Buckingham based this book on research he did involving 30 women (which seems like an awfully low sample size to me).
A Reader

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

15 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Wanda Brewer on October 4, 2009
Format: Hardcover
This time around, Marcus Buckingham offers many more tools instead of gadgets comparing Find Your Strongest Life to the Truth About You. I could relate to the check points of knowing you are living a strong life: feeling what you do fulfills you, feeling inspired to start each day, wanting to learn something new, and, your most important needs are being met by your circle of support. If prior to reading this book, I was asked to put into words "why" I felt my life was strong and happy, I would have only been able to say, "because I feel like I am in control of what I do." I am a partner in a small business so while I may feel like I often carry the weight of the world on my shoulders as I also wear my mom and volunteer hats, I thrive on knowing I can make things happen instead of having to wait for permission to take a stab at a new idea. Ownership also keeps me inspired to keep learning about what other small businesses are doing. Thanks to Marcus, I can now intelligently put into words why my life is so rewarding.

However, it was not always like this, by far might I add. This is where I had to stop short of a perfect five stars. If I had read this when my four children were still very young, I would have been completely frustrated because I was in no way married to a man who would ever entertain staying home to raise the kids while I went after what made me feel strong. I also did not have the earning power needed to hire a nanny, or housekeeper, or yard service and an evening job was not possible due to his travel schedule. This was not addressed in Find Your Strongest Life. Maybe this needs to be the next book Marcus--How to Find Happiness with Your Strongest Life on Hold while You Do the Right Thing for Your Family.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
41 of 49 people found the following review helpful By John Chancellor TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on August 3, 2009
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Today women are better educated, have better jobs, better pay, more choices about mates, careers ... just about everything. But that has not translated into women being happier. Actually with more choices the opposite is true. Womens overall happiness has been on a steady decline since 1972. This decline in happiness occurs across the board, regardless of whether women have children, how many they have, or how much they earn.

Marcus Buckingham is a well known researcher. He has written five previous books which centered around the concept that each person will be happiest when they are working from their greatest strength. Find Your Strongest Life got its start from a three hour workshop with Oprah. The workshop was conducted with 30 talented but unfulfilled women.

In his mission statement Marcus says, "My mission is to help each person identify her strengths, take them seriously and offer them to the world."

The book starts off by citing 10 myths about women. Here are just a few: As women get older they become more engaged and fulfilled. (False) If women had more free time they would feel less stressed. (False) Having children makes women happier. (children create more stress) At work, women are relegated to the lower level roles. (False) There are ten that Marcus addresses and it is the starting point for the book.

The book is in three parts. The first part deals with the paradox of modern life. Women have more but it is not bringing the happiness they thought/hoped it would.

Part two is a guide to how to live your strongest life. Here the book goes into great detail in how to identify and live your strongest life. Part three is basically a Q & A section.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
88 of 112 people found the following review helpful By Bret L. Simmons on October 4, 2009
Format: Hardcover
I do not recommend this book. The title leads you to believe that Marcus Buckingham applies his "decades of research" to once again tell us how simply finding your strength will make you a happier and more successful woman. Don't fall for it - he doesn't prove anything close.

I volunteered to read and review this book as part of the Thomas Nelson Book Review Bloggers Team. In all fairness, I must reveal that I have read another one of Buckingham's books, First Break All the Rules, and I hated it also. Buckingham is extremely well known for his other books on strengths, and he is a very good writer, so I predict this book will also sell very well.

The book is divided into three parts. Part I is entitled "Something's got to give" and details the unique challenges and stressors that women face. This part is actually pretty good. He makes some very important points in this section, the most important being that "over the last few decades, women have become less happy with their lives, and as women get older, they get sadder" (p. 21). That conclusion appears to be supported by independent research.

Buckingham's explanation for this is that women are not focusing their attention "the challenge of all the different roles you play is not that you don't have enough hours in the day. The challenge of all these roles is that during the hours you choose to work you have too many different things going on at any one time to focus properly no each of them. Your time isn't stretched; your attention is." (pp. 41-42). He supports this conclusion based on the work of Barry Schwartz The Paradox of Choice: Why More is Less (2005).

Chapters one through three are pretty well supported with notes with references that can be found in the back of the book.
Read more ›
5 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews