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Finding Our True Home: Living in the Pure Land Here and Now Paperback – August 1, 2003


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 144 pages
  • Publisher: Parallax Press (August 1, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1888375345
  • ISBN-13: 978-1888375343
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 0.3 x 8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 6.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #941,859 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"As human beings, our deepest desire is to find an environment which is secure and where there is love and understanding. All of us want to live in such an environment. If you live in surroundings where you feel there is security, understanding, and love and where people have the capacity to transform their suffering, fear, and attachment, then you live in the Pure Land." --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Thich Nhat Hanh is a Vietnamese monk, a renowned Zen master, a poet, and a peace activist. He was nominated for the Nobel Prize by Martin Luther King, Jr., in 1967, and is the author of many books, including the best-selling The Miracle of Mindfulness.

Customer Reviews

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See all 8 customer reviews
So, even if the Amitabha sutra is a metaphor for a nondual understanding, one should practice anyway.
Joseph Siemion
Perhaps one of the most profound and helpful concepts is learning to see that the pure land is here and now, that it is more a state of mind than an actual place.
mdsarc
Cautiously used, this is a very important work as a foundational text for use in a dialogue with non-Buddhist devotional religions.
N. Burlakoff

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Joseph Siemion on December 20, 2009
Format: Paperback
I have an appreciation of both east-asian and Theravada Buddhism, so I write this review with a full appreciation of the Pali scriptures.

This is a splendid book on so many levels. Nhat Hanh's writing is clear, engaging, practical, and full of warmth.

He writes that there are three levels from which we may understand this sutra. The reader practices according to his level, i.e., the Pure Land is figurative, both figurative and literal, or literal: there really is a Western Pure Land, like there is a United States, and Amitabha will save us all. He doesn't make those who believe in a literal Pure Land feel silly or inferior. He encourages such a belief, especially if it brings about wholesome states of mind. He's clear that his own view is that the Pure Land is a metaphor for understanding that this life, just as it is, IS or CAN BE the Pure Land, depending on our state of mind. He does a magnificient job of elucidating this view. While reading this book, I'd occasionally get the feeling -- Wow, this really is the Pure Land, and I AM surrounded by bodhisattvas -- my chance to practice is now, there's no better place or time to practice.

Even though he understands the Pure Land from this view, he encourages Buddha remembrance and recitation in order to purify our minds. He engages and allows for both levels of understanding simultaneously, and this is what I find so brilliant about this commentary. So, even if the Amitabha sutra is a metaphor for a nondual understanding, one should practice anyway.

This is absolutely an essential read for those with an interest or devotion to the Amitabha Sutra. In my own path, my evaluation of this sutra has gone back and forth. After reading this book, it's clear to me that this is an exceptional sutra worthy of understanding and practice by any and all Buddhists.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By mdsarc on June 14, 2008
Format: Paperback
This book deals with pure land buddhism. While it is a commentary on the Amitabha Sutra, it goes much further. Perhaps one of the most profound and helpful concepts is learning to see that the pure land is here and now, that it is more a state of mind than an actual place. Recommended.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By N. Burlakoff on March 8, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
After an introduction by Sister Annabel Laity there follows a translation (from the Chinese version of Kumarasjiva's translation) of the Smaller Amithaba Sutra also known as the Smaller Sukhavativyuha Sutra ; the translation, in turn, is followed by section that suggest ways to practice (pages 21 to 50) and then, by Thich Nhat Hanh's commentary on the sutra. The essential point that TNH makes is that the "Pure Land" (Sukhavati) which is comparable to the Christian "Kingdom of God" (Luke 17:21and Mark 4:26), Jewish Garden of Eden (Psalm 84), the Islamic "Eden," or the Hindu "Amaravati," is something that you create and inhabit as you are living the present life. In fact, TNH goes so far as to maintain that, if one cannot access the "Pure Land" in one's present lifetime the chances of doing so after death are non-existent. The commentary on the sutra is divided into ten parts with each part quoting a section of the sutra and then introducing many of the basic terms/concepts that are found in Buddhism. One caution that needs to be kept in mind by newcomers to Buddhism, particularly TNH's interpretation of it, is the innovative terms that TNH uses as substitutes for more historically traditional terms, such as the use of "mindfulness training" for the term "precepts," etc. Cautiously used, this is a very important work as a foundational text for use in a dialogue with non-Buddhist devotional religions.
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful By A. A Trosper on October 13, 2008
Format: Paperback
I enjoyed this book very much.

pureland buddhism is part of chinese and japanese buddhism and is practiced along side zen and is part of tibetian buddhism.Peaceful Death, Joyful Rebirth: A Tibetan Buddhist Guidebook: Tulku Thondup is a great book on how the tibetians view the buddha, amitabha buddha who is recognized in all schools of buddhism at times given different names and understandings or teachings. people that are insulting pureland practice and beliefs have NO understanding of buddhism or the teachings of gutama buddha. the reviewers that insult pureland practice are not well versed in buddhism or it's history. my self i do not understand western beliefs and could not speak for them or a against them but comparing any buddhist practice to western practice is totally incorrect and attempts to compare are the babble of the rabble..
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