Qty:1
  • List Price: $17.99
  • Save: $5.32 (30%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 2 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by Swissf7
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Book in Beautiful Shape. Very Clean.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Fire in the Head: Shamanism and the Celtic Spirit Paperback – May 14, 1993


Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$12.67
$8.01 $3.07


Frequently Bought Together

Fire in the Head: Shamanism and the Celtic Spirit + Shamanism As a Spiritual Practice for Daily Life + Awakening to the Spirit World: The Shamanic Path of Direct Revelation
Price for all three: $40.40

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Hero Quick Promo
Browse in Books with Buzz and explore more details on selected titles, including the current pick, "The Bone Clocks" by David Mitchell.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 240 pages
  • Publisher: HarperOne; 1st edition (May 14, 1993)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0062501747
  • ISBN-13: 978-0062501745
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 6.1 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (26 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #63,286 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"A remarkable exploration of shamanism [using] cross-cultural myths to explain the history and roots of the Celtic spirit." -- -- Sandra Ingerman, author of Soul Retrieval: Mending the Fragmented Self

"An important and fascinating work on Celtic shamanism. Highly recommended." -- -- Serge Kahili King, author of Urban Shaman

About the Author

Tom Cowan is the author of How to Tap Into Your Own Genius and the coauthor of Power of the Witch and Love Magic.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

It's well researched and presented.
Siobhan Olaoghaire Sannes
I first read this book when a friend loaned it to me, but I had to buy my own copy, because I knew I would want to read it again.
Bernadette Wulf
Definitely fills a place of longing for us Celtic folk in North America.
Alida Birch

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

71 of 72 people found the following review helpful By Frank MacEowen on January 6, 2002
Format: Paperback
It has been nearly ten years now since Fire in the Head: Shamanism and the Celtic Spirit was released. Ten years. That is a very long time for readers to encounter a number of other books on Celtic traditions, shamanism, and Celtic spirituality in general. However, if we track back to 1993 when this book was first released we will quickly see that at that time there really had not been any sort of exhaustive study of the shamanic archetype within the Celtic traditions--which Fire in the Head: Shamanism and the Celtic Spirit clearly is.
Others who have reviewed this book and offered a less than gleaming assessment of the book are undoubtedly people who are seeking either more of a hands-on, experiential, or practical book on shamanic techniques (see Cowan's Shamanism As A Spiritual Practice for Daily Life), or something with a more classical scholarly 'feel' to it (see F. Marian McNeill's, The Silver Bough, W.Y.Evans-Wentz' The Fairy Faith in Celtic Countries, or Celtic Heritage by the Rees'). However, for an overall introduction to the numinous power and energy of the shamanic archetype within the primal Celtic traditions Fire in the Head, even after ten years, is still the best introduction. It is a wide-sweeping flight into the themes and topics, devoid of the particularities of personal cosmology one sees in so many other Celtic books. Cowan gets out of the way so that readers can have their own experience and make their own assumptions. Certainly, once a person has read this it is time to read such works as Jean Markele's The Druids, Caitlin and John Matthews' The Encyclopaedia of Celtic Wisdom, etc., but, again, for an introduction to the core elements of primal Irish, Welsh, and Scottish animisitic spirituality this is still the best.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By S. K. Harrell VINE VOICE on March 31, 2005
Format: Paperback
On my shelf of shamanist titles, this one sits prominently figured. Cowan presents the traditional fantastic experiences of the shaman in an amazingly receivable framework. His experience of archetypes in well-known myths and legends opens one to the ability to read all things symbolically, thus, as the dynamic spiritual presences that they are. To that end I regard Cowan as a shapeshifter of symbols, not an interpreter of them. His telling of olde tales connects their spirit with a modern audience.

In this book his love and connection to the Celtic path is evident, though it is not necessarily rooted in what we know of Celtic history, itself. I feel it is important to make that distinction, as Cowan is cultivating the opening of the shamanic experience of metaphor in a Celtic context. He is not a Reconstructionist, thus this work offers, rather, an experiential opportunity in a Celtic framework.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
34 of 41 people found the following review helpful By Jennifer Gibbons on December 31, 1998
Format: Paperback
A very enjoyable and readable book on modern, Celt-inspired shamanism. It's not, however, a reliable guide to Pagan Celtic beliefs. The research quality is extremely erratic. Much of it is okay/good, though Cowan has a tendency to re-write the myths and present his re-workings as original texts. However parts of the book are abysmal. The chapter on the "shamanic" aspects of witchcraft, for instance, is completely inaccurate, showing a near total ignorance of historical witchcraft. So if you're looking for history, look elsewhere. However if you want a "Celtic" brand of Neo-Paganism, this is a very beautiful, evocative vision.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 28, 2003
Format: Paperback
I first became interested in shamanism after reading books by core-shamanic practioners Michael Harner and Sandra Ingerman. While these books described a way of relating to and healing with the natural world that I have always longed for, my heart yearned for a practice more connected with my long-forgotten European ancestry. Soon I found this book, which addresses the issues of recovering native European Celtic traditions. I agree that it's a wonderful introduction to Celtic mysticism and spirituality. Cowan covers a wide variety of topics to "pull" from and trigger remembrance. Regarding the witchcraft issue, black and white magic has been a part of every native tradition since the beginning of time. Certainly the inappropriate use of magic figures prominently in our collective soul wounds, and needs to be considered.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
21 of 26 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 30, 2001
Format: Paperback
This book does a very good job in outlining the Shamanic experience and where this mindset intersects (quite strongly) with Celtic ways. The parallels are brought out strongly and the progression of the book is nearly flawless. The book does an execellent job is emphasizing that the demystification we are suffering from is addressed nicely by aspects of both Shamanism and Celtic spirituality. If the book was consistent in its approach it would have deserved five stars.
The main problem I have with this book is that the author spends too much time on being an apologist (or promoter) for witchcraft and magic. (Check the authors other books and you will see why this is the case.) Certainly aspects of wicca and witchcraft in general are etched into Celtic myth and history. But the authors own biases bring this area up to a level not fitting with the subject of this book. Most of the chapter on 'The Soul of Nature' brings out details of witchcraft generally not supportive of the main thesis. More than occasional references to the tarot, magic, and other mystical/occult topics off subject leave the reader wondering why so much time is spent on things outside the universal/traditional shamanic experience.
A worthwhile and almost required reading for anyone interested in Shamanism and Celtic spirituality. The noted flaws keep the book from being an indispensable and serious academic contribution to the subject.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?