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Fire to Fire Unknown Binding – January 1, 2008


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Product Details

  • Unknown Binding
  • Publisher: Harper Collins; Third edition edition (January 1, 2008)
  • ISBN-10: 0060752475
  • ISBN-13: 978-0060752477
  • ASIN: B0021M98RG
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #6,967,437 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
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See all 14 customer reviews
Great poet and have bought other of his books of poetry.
geo49e
This collection of poetry contains selections from each of his previous seven books of poetry with his newest poetry leading off the book.
Deanna C. Clark
One way he does this, I believe, is by giving the reader emotional distance by using metaphors so deftly and so subtly.
Audrey C. Friedman

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Mark Doty is one poet who continually astonishes me. I read his work and am always swept up in his lush vocabulary, the musicality of his language, the richness of details in the images he creates of the natural world. Suddenly, I realize, usually with an audible gasp, that he has taken me somewhere unexpected; he led me gently somewhere I can make meaning in a much more personal context. One way he does this, I believe, is by giving the reader emotional distance by using metaphors so deftly and so subtly. The reader finds beauty even in the darkest places.

Doty is the poet who led me to poetry, and I do believe that "Fire to Fire" is the book I'd take to the proverbial "desert island" with me. I've reread his paperback titles so many times that they are nearly disintegrating. After reading "Pipistrelle," "The Green Crab's Shell," "The Source," and so many other new and old favorites all beautifully bound in this hard cover volume, I do believe I'm doing triple lutzes! I'm off the ground!

This book is a must-have for anyone who reads, collects, and studies contemporary American poetry.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Michael Salcman on January 25, 2009
Format: Hardcover
Mark Doty is one of our most courageous and important cultural voices, both because of his unflinching subject matter and the ground he occupies in the aesthetic debates of late modernism. This volume of New and Selected poems justly deserves the National Book Award it has recently received. It's important to note that "Turtle, Swan", his wonderful first volume, sadly underrepresented here by only two poems, came out just when public awareness of the AIDS crisis was hitting a crescendo (1987). In many respects, Doty occupies the same position in the poetry of that era that his near contemporary David Wojnarowicz (1954-1992) does in the visual arts. Doty's elegies to lost friends and lovers, his straightforward depiction of city life in the 1980s and 1990s, and his lyrical infusion of homoeroticism into almost all of his poems, whatever their ostensible subject, reached an early apotheosis in his third book "My Alexandria" (1993). Both "Atlantis" (1995) and "Sweet Machine" (1998) continued in this ecstatic, powerful, life-affirming mode, the poems employing clear narrative, sharp diction, and strict attention to sound and natural details. Doty is dog-crazy, art-mad and besotted with flowers. His ekphrastic poems are among his best because he always takes the radiant side of beauty in any aesthetic debate. In the books of the current decade, the new work becomes somewhat more opaque, more self-consciously experimental, more dependent on the closing line or a starkly stated theme for impact. Still, even the last decade has work that bears comparison with his best. Among the latter, you will never forget your first encounter with "Night Ferry", "No", "A Green Crab's Shell", the first section of "Atlantis", "Crepe de Chine", or "White Kimono". There are dozens of others that bear re-reading and, if you are a writer, close study: Doty's technical brilliance is so understated it feels like close-up magic.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By ishi on January 24, 2009
Format: Hardcover
This book was my introduction to Mark Doty, and it did not disappoint. His language is rich, dense, almost overwhelming sometimes. A poet myself, I find myself becoming jealous of his descriptions, so original and perfect are they. For example, in his poem "Theory of beauty (Grackles on Montrose)" his descriptions of the sounds the birds make include "drop the tin can", "really creaky hinge," and "limping siren." Not to mention "tea kettle in hell." Wonderful! If you get this book and like it, let me also recommend "The Water Sonnets" by Kenton Wing Robinson. They are tighter and more economical poems but vividly descriptive.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By James M. Robinson on April 25, 2009
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Mark Doty's poems are clear and personal without being ambiguously intellectualized. Personal and intimate without being sentimental. Intelligent without being academic. This is not university workshop stuff. It comes from the outside world of a variety of cities, towns and provinces. The 300+ pages of selected poems offer a great general overview of the poet's work up to now. The back cover shows enthusiastic endorsements from Phillip Levine, Mary Oliver, Robert Pinski, and Alan Shapiro. Amazon makes the book easily available from various sources and economical.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Deanna C. Clark on November 29, 2009
Format: Paperback
Mark Doty's Fire To Fire is a carefully crafted presentation, a gallery of artistic finesse, showing Doty's solidity and influence in contemporary American poetry. This collection of poetry contains selections from each of his previous seven books of poetry with his newest poetry leading off the book. Contrary to the typical organization of poetry collections, Doty's Fire to Fire begins with fresh material so both old and new readers can engage with the writer Doty is today before they trace his development as a poet. The collection then continues with a chronological selection from each book beginning with Turtle, Swan and ending with School of the Arts. Doty's narrative style and his love of art, coupled with a dedication to craft and uncanny ability to extract beauty from urban decay makes for poetry that is not only easy to read but also poetry that resonates with a universal quest for meaning and truth in life. His connection with Modernism and the influence of Walt Whitman, Wallace Stevens, and William Carlos Williams, is evident but decidedly more apparent in earlier works such as "Homo Will not Inherit" (one of my personal favorites) and "Atlantis." In his newer works the Modernists become a ghostly residue, apparitions that show up as characters in his poems, still filtering through their influence but no longer the main style represented. For example, in "Apparition" the subject of the poem is an encounter the speaker has with the ghost of Walt Whitman. Doty is growing, focusing more on philosophical ruminations than narrative that centers on a concrete topic. The growth is evident on the series of poems describing his various contemplations on beauty, marriage, the soul, the sublime, etc.Read more ›
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