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Fires of Faith: Catholic England under Mary Tudor First Edition first Printing Edition

3.4 out of 5 stars 12 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-0300152166
ISBN-10: 0300152167
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Editorial Reviews

Review

"Fires of Faith is a dazzling exercise in historical reappraisal, after which the reign of Mary Tudor will never look quite the same again."—Peter Marshall, Times Literary Supplement
(Peter Marshall Times Literary Supplement)

Chosen as an Outstanding Academic Title for 2009 by Choice Magazine
(Choice 2010-01-01)

"This is an erudite, revisionist perspective on a topic many apparently thought was burned into historical truth. . . . Eamon Duffy brings insight, passion, and scholarly persistence. . . . Scholars and otherwise curious readers will find Fires of Faith's reassessment of the Catholic spirit of Marian England well worth ongoing consideration."—Fredrica Harris Thompsett, Anglican and Episcopal History
(Fredrica Harris Thompsett Anglican and Episcopal History)

"This study is learned and eloquent, and does much to establish the credentials of a church that has suffered from centuries of adverse publicity. Even more, however, it demonstrates the perils of ideological conflict. The Protestants won by historical accident, but it is pure gain to see the other side of the story so ably presented."—David Loades, Journal of British Studies
(David Loades Journal of British Studies)

"Fires of Faith is a daring and masterful reinterpretation of a key moment in English history and also in the history of Catholicism. Although many will surely challenge its assertions, this book’s significance is beyond dispute, precisely because it encourages disputation. Duffy questions the dominant narrative created by Protestants long ago and, in the process,opens doors that only the timid and the foolhardy will dare to ignore."—Carlos M. N. Eire, The Catholic Historical Review
(Carlos M. N. Eire The Catholic Historical Review)

"Duffy has once again written a book that opens new questions and will be indispensable for future considerations of Mary's reign."—Scott McGinnis, Journal of Religion
(Scott McGinnis Journal of Religion)

About the Author

Eamon Duffy is professor of the history of Christianity at the University of Cambridge. He is the author of many prize-winning books, including The Stripping of the Altars, Saints and Sinners, The Voices of Morebath, and Marking the Hours, all published by Yale University Press.
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 280 pages
  • Publisher: Yale University Press; First Edition first Printing edition (September 15, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0300152167
  • ISBN-13: 978-0300152166
  • Product Dimensions: 9.4 x 6.2 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,163,494 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
This history of the Catholic Counter-Reformation in England gets short thrift. Modern prejudice mingles with 400 years of historical bias and nationalism to conjure up an opposite view: that Catholicism was a dead religion, that Anglicanism restored its glory without its superstition, and that England was mercifully spared the Wars of Religion pitting the backwards Catholic legions against the bloody-yet-enlightened Protestant resistance of the 17th century.

Modern scholarship fused with modern secularism has allowed for a more clear lens. Duffy's exemplary efforts to shine a brighter light on just precisely what Tudor England was dealing with -- and how Mary Tudor and Reginald Pole truly were -- offers a great deal more insight in to the reign of Elizabeth and the primordial nation-state that Elizabeth helped to forge.

For those who have seen Showtime's "The Tudors" and are looking for the next chapter (without the sexualism) or for those looking for a good one-volume overview of the post Henry VIII period, this book is an indispensable introduction into a period little studied and hardly understood by all but the most fanatic of royalists or historians of the period.
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Format: Paperback
Eamon Duffy argues in Fires of Faith: Catholic England under Mary Tudor that the Marian Counter-Reformation was the foundation for the later European Catholic-Reformation and was not, as argued by modern historians, “ineffective, half-hearted” or “lacking in leadership.” Duffy elaborates upon four points in order to support his claim. First, Duffy posits that Cardinal Reginald Pole was an competent and skilled Counter-Reformation leader. Second, he claims that Catholic preaching was an important aspect of the Marian restoration. Third, Duffy claims Marian propaganda was highly effective and pervasive. Lastly, he points out that the brutal burning of heretics was neither “anachronistic” nor taken lightly by the Marian regime, but played a major role in dissuading evangelical leanings.

According to Duffy, modern historians view Cardinal Pole as having an “aversion to the more adventurous aspects of the Counter-Reformation” and “that the established narratives of the reign would not look very different if Pole were to be edited out of them altogether. Claiming that these viewpoints are “profoundly mistaken,” Duffy states that Pole “was the single most influential figure in the Marian restoration: put briefly, he was in charge.” He warrants his view based on two of Pole's works: Pole's De Unitate (1536) which called for papal primacy and his St. Andrew's Day speech of 1554 where Pole issued the first call for Counter-Reformation in Europe. These endeavors ensured Pole's leadership of the English Counter-Reformation. Thus, Duffy argues, “Pole's voice had become the official voice of the Marian regime, both in print and private” and that “Mary took her lead from Pole.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Provides some interesting insights into what actually went on during Queen Mary's reign. It wasn't quite like what we were taught in school.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Clear history of a confusing era!
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Format: Hardcover
The de-legitimzing of non-catholic faith and will to sweep under the rug the real history of that community is annoying at best. Against a backdrop of current politics--- the Jesuits inciting their Latin people, the ex-slaves of Spain with "liberation theology" and its peculiar anti-protestant/anti-american/ message, as well as catholic insistence on the Hart-Celler act, to open border to the catholic-incited peoples, makes such "spiin" as one of their newscaster's puts it, somewhat questionable. This is not the time for this sort of work. BUt rather, for catholics to confront the DISASTER Vatican II had for another protestant country, and from which they always continue to feed, even as they condemn the very source of their abundance as heretical. (that they have never been able to be blessed with, not really, unless extortion in taxes in their countries is a "blessing of god"). Catholic chutzpah! Hasbara! Spin indeed! A no-go on this one.
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Format: Hardcover
Mary I can be considered England's first undisputed female sovereign. In her five years as Queen (1553-1558), Mary repealed Edward VI's religious laws, re-established Catholicism, and burned 283 (or 284) Protestant martyrs, earning herself the name `Bloody Mary'. Her reign is often seem simply as a cruel and ultimately futile attempt to return England to Catholicism (for which an heir was required) or, at least, to arrest England's progress towards becoming a Protestant nation (which was inevitable once her half-sister Elizabeth was definitely her only heir). But is this a fair assessment of Mary I's reign?

In this book, Eamon Duffy, Professor of the History of Christianity at the University of Cambridge, argues that the management of the return to Catholicism was not ineptly handled. Instead, Professor Duffy puts forward a case that the process (largely driven by Reginald Pole, Cardinal and the last Catholic Archbishop of Canterbury) was well planned, and the arrangements put in place were both sensible and practical. Unfortunately, for Mary I's place in history, five years was not sufficient time to bed down these reforms and the pall cast by the burnings overshadows the fact that the Protestantism installed during Edward VI's reign was opportunistic, confused and destructive. The widely held view of Mary is also a consequence of the ultimate victory of Protestantism in England: history is written by the victors.

But looking beyond the fact of the Reformation to the possible causes of it (did the Roman Catholic Church need reforming, or did Henry VIII break with Rome simply to marry Anne Boleyn?) introduces some different possibilities for looking at Mary I's reign.
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