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The Fires of Heaven (The Wheel of Time, Book 5) Mass Market Paperback – October 15, 1994


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The Fires of Heaven (The Wheel of Time, Book 5) + Lord of Chaos (The Wheel of Time, Book 6) + The Shadow Rising (The Wheel of Time, Book 4)
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Product Details

  • Series: Wheel of Time (Book 5)
  • Mass Market Paperback: 992 pages
  • Publisher: Tor Fantasy (October 15, 1994)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0812550307
  • ISBN-13: 978-0812550306
  • Product Dimensions: 6.7 x 4.1 x 1.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (518 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #18,261 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Rand al'Thor, the Dragon Reborn, continues his effort to unify the diverse people of a discordant world against the Dark One in this fifth tome of the Wheel of Time series (begun with The Eye of the World ). While the Aes Sedai, women who channel the One Power, and the Forsaken, ancient disciples of the Dark One, strive to bend him to their purposes, Rand leads the clans of the Aiel in a war of unification. Rand must try to master his powers as a man who can channel, while eluding the concomitant madness, as two groups of women attempt to come to his aid. His love, Elayne, Daughter-Heir of Andor, and Nynaeve, both Aes Sedai in training, join a circus to evade an angry sisterhood, and Siuan Sanche, former leader of the Aes Sedai now stripped of her powers, and two companions seek other rebels in an attempt to avert the final doom. Jordan deftly weaves details from previous books into this narrative and includes a glossary so that new readers can pick up the saga at this point. But all should beware: the few months covered here suggest it may be years and many more volumes before this series reaches its conclusion.
Copyright 1993 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

From Library Journal

Rand al'Thor, the Dragon Reborn, leads his army of desert warriors toward a destined war against the forces of the Dark One. Elsewhere, while the Forsaken seed the land with their plots of corruption, a few stalwart individuals gather their strength for the coming battle. Jordan's epic saga of a world threatened by evil incarnate builds steadily as separate strands of a complex plot begin to come together. Fans of this richly detailed and vividly imagined series will not be disappointed.
Copyright 1993 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

More About the Author

Robert Jordan was born in 1948 in Charleston, South Carolina. He taught himself to read when he was four with the incidental aid of a twelve-years-older brother and was tackling Mark Twain and Jules Verne by five. He is a graduate of The Citadel, the Military College of South Carolina, with a degree in physics. He served two tours in Vietnam with the U.S. Army; among his decorations are the Distinguished Flying Cross with bronze oak leaf cluster, the Bronze Star with "V" and bronze oak leaf cluster, and two Vietnamese Gallantry Crosses with palm. A history buff, he has also written dance and theater criticism and enjoyed the outdoor sports of hunting, fishing, and sailing, and the indoor sports of poker, chess, pool, and pipe collecting.

Robert Jordan began writing in 1977 and went on to write The Wheel of Time(R), one of the most important and best selling series in the history of fantasy publishing with over 14 million copies sold in North America, and countless more sold abroad.

Robert Jordan died on September 16, 2007, after a courageous battle with the rare blood disease amyloidosis.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

62 of 69 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 23, 1998
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I am rereading the series for the umpteenth time, in anticipation of reading "The Path of Daggers." I just finished TFOH. It seems each book in the series is better than its predecessor. Unlike Knight Michaels, who writes nearby, I found a lot of character growth in the book. And, I don't see what he means by his comment about "...murdering characters...."
In TFOH, we see a lot of Rand. He emerges as a complex person. He seems somehow to fully understand that almost everybody wants to kill him or to use him for their own purposes, whether or not it helps the cause. He's the only one who has a holistic view about the nature of the conflict. He hardens himself like iron, using and commanding whole nations against his own nature. And yet, three pretty girls can put him through agonies of uncertainty and self-doubting.
Prior to this book, we knew little about Elayne. Sure, she's a spoiled brat. She's also delightfully spunky and adventurous, and she too is learning how to deal with smart, energetic people like Thom Merrilin in a way that will help her become a ruler.
Nynaeve has a ton of conflicts gnawing at her - her relationship with Lan, her feelings about Aes Sedai and Moiraine, being challenged by Egwene, etc. The stable, quiet world in which she lived for 25 years has been replaced by a maelstrom of currents, and she's having a hard time coping. But, she's tough as nails and fierce as a tigress, and she's a heavyweight with the One Power. The scenes with her and Moghedien in the Royal Palace are absolutely riveting.
Mat continues his march to becoming my own favorite character. He would take the easy way out in every situation, but The Wheel won't let him. He is a reluctant hero at best.
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57 of 64 people found the following review helpful By Norm Zurawski on January 23, 2003
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I'm going to start this review with an assumption; that you've read the first 4 books in the Wheel of Time series. I'm going to make a second assumption; that you're not sure if you want to embark on a 1000 page long journey to...wherever the next one goes.
That's a start. If those assumptions are right, then this review may help you. If not, maybe this review will serve to give you an idea of how Jordan writes. Failing those 2, I have no idea why you might be reading this. But I'll do my best to entertain you.
Jordan can put words together. Like a bricklayer, he can slap words down and cement them in place with the best of them. As you read the book, you never stumble through pages of narrative. If the procession of words is a foundation, Jordan builds a good one. It's fairly easy to walk through the pages of the book because Jordan is, in general, a good wordsmith. What's he not necessarily good at is getting to the point. His well built foundation often times supports a minimal structure.
This book is better than the 4th in the series. But after several hundred pages, you begin to seriously wonder why you're still reading it. After roughly 600 pages, I asked myself, "Is this going anywhere?" I was reminded of the Talking Heads song, Road to Nowhere. I'm actually being serious.
Eventually it does go somewhere, and that's what makes this book better than the 4th in the series. That, and the fact that the last 100 pages serve as the conclusion. In contrast, I think book #4 was wrapped up in about 5 pages. However, I'd be lying if I said I had trouble putting it down. The truth is, Jordan slogs through another loooooooong book to tell a relatively normal length story; but with a lot of words added to describe things you don't necessarily want to read.
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23 of 25 people found the following review helpful By Jon Fingland on January 15, 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback
The fifth book of the Wheel of Time Series, compells you to read on like those before it. Despite suffering from the same ailment as book 4 (The Shadow Rising), that is too much detail, The Fires of Heaven finally gives Moiraine a place in your heart, finally unwraps any built up dislike, and truly lets you see her as a real woman.
The Forsaken (or Chosen as they call themselves) play an even larger role in this episode, revealing not only how much Rand has matured but also how far he has to go.
The lack of any presence of Perrin only assures me that he has a larger role in future novels in this series, and the few brief glimpses of Emond's Field in Tel'aran'rhiod give you a glimpse and expectation of what's to come.
I regret that I feel at times "Where is this going? When does the end come?", all I need do is remind myself of the struggles of the people in the World that Jordan has so intricately constructed. The characters come alive as never before. Like real poeple, the depths of their personalities vary, but all are worth considering. If nothing else I can honestly say that when reading this and other books in the wheel of time, I do not read words on a page, but rather gaze about me and see the amazing and fantastic events unfold around me. I am always by the end of every installment, more than willing to read the next if only to visit with those who seem friends near and dear to me.
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17 of 18 people found the following review helpful By James Chapman on October 18, 2005
Format: Hardcover
This is the 5th book in the Wheel of Time series. As with the other books of the series, I will rate and review the book on its own merits and not be influenced by any shortcomings of other books.

First off is whether or not this book qualifies as a stand alone book. It has a clear cut beginning (Rand trying to decide what to do next after the events of the previous book). This storyline culminates in the events of Caemlyn, thus giving it a clear cut ending. I thus feel that this book is a stand alone book though much would not make sense to someone who hasn't read the previous books. There also still some unresolved threads making future books necessary as might be expected.

What I liked:

*Rand's growing strength in the power and finally growing confidence.

*Resolution of a couple of problems (even though new ones arise)

*Battles against the Forsaken, some long overdue

*Further Intrigue

*Mat's emerging skills as a tactician as well as more comedy at his expense.

*Birgitte

*Moiraine

*Lanfear

*The most argued about mystery in the whole Wheel of Time series!

What I didn't like:

*The pace slows down, particularly during the Elayne, Nynaeve, Birgitte quest. Even though some important events happen during this quest, it is still a tough read in those parts particularly when re-reading the book. I don't mind a slower pace as long as the information in it is relevant and leads to something climatic. A little more brevity in some parts would have been better. As one other reviewer alluded to, by this time in the series, we have firm pictures of the main characters in our minds and don't need a reintroduction to them or at least not THAT detailed of one.
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