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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on December 2, 2008
In one sense, any Firing Line interview from the 1960's is worth owning as history if nothing else. If I recall correctly, this aired after the 1966 election and they discussed nearly the exact same stuff Republicans are discussing today following the 2008 election. It's interesting to hear how little has changed.

I was rather floored, however, to hear Goldwater speak fondly of Woodrow Wilson. Was this is a function of the time and a yearning for authoritarian rule? Or is there something I really don't understand about Goldwater? Buckley doesn't explore this point, but I was surprised to hear it.

In the end, I enjoyed the program and I'm glad I bought it however there isn't much here that'll likely lead me to watch it a second time. Interesting, but not riveting.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on October 4, 2012
In 1966 William F. Buckley's show "Firing Line" was just beginning its long run. One of the show's first guests was Barry Goldwater, who had lost the prior presidential election. In this episode the two discuss the future of conservatism after Goldwater's defeat and the passage of the liberal legislation of the mid-Sixties.

Goldwater was prescient on Medicare and on the ultimate ideological homogenization of the two major political parties. Buckley and Goldwater also examined the concentration of power in the presidency, mused on the likelihood of defeating an incumbent president and of a GOP win in 1968, and discussed the possible roles of Ronald Reagan and Richard Nixon in the Republican Party. The two also discussed foreign policy, touching on Vietnam, China, and Communism.

Some of the topics in this episode of "Firing Line" are dated, but others are timeless, including the discussion of some of the challenges conservatives seemingly face in any era. Modern-day conservatives would enjoy looking back at this conversation between perhaps the two most important figures in American conservatism in the mid-1960s.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on February 6, 2009
I just recently got to watch this. It's excellent. I only wish it (the program)were longer.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on January 17, 2010
As the title denotes, most of Buckley and Goldwater's conversation is about the future.

- Ronald Reagan was running for Governor of California as this episode of Firing Line was filmed in June 1966.

- In reply to Buckley quoting Time magazine that mayor of New York John Lindsay will be the GOP nominee for president or VP in 1968, Goldwater notes that Republicans don't need New York stamps of approval anymore - the party has moved west. "The west has proven that the Republican party does not need to be controlled from the east. And we're not going to let that change."

- Buckley and Goldwater are already speaking of Reagan as the future of conservatism and the Republican party. Nixon is spoken of as viable for the 1968 nomination with pragmatic tones and respect for his tireless loyalty to Republican candidates. "If Reagan is elected governor of California," Goldwater adds, "This gets to be a new ball game."

- In this Firing Line setting, Goldwater's speaking voice sounds a lot like Reagan's... as does his choice of words. (Or, Reagan sounds a lot like Goldwater). This somewhat discounts a standard belief that Reagan was a more likable, palatable version of Goldwater. Some difference seems to be in facial expression. Goldwater's expression is poker faced with an occasional muted eye twinkle at political irony, and a mild subtext of "Don't f- with me." (In contrast, Reagan has the trademark twinkle in his eye that expresses joy, good humor, and "Don't even think of f-ing with me").

- Check the Firing Line with Reagan DVD filmed January 1980 and see Reagan launch from Buckley's and Goldwater's foundation. I've seen many Firing Line shows, and Reagan is the only guest whose stature/presence seems to... leave Buckley satiated and almost speechless. Well, almost. There's not much more to add.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on May 1, 2010
This black-and-white episode is a one on one interview with former presidential candidate Barry Goldwater. Although any Firing Line episode has a certain level of interest, this one was a real snoozer. No wonder Goldwater lost big-time. He was a pundit, not a candidate! If you like history, AND you like hearing political organizer drone on and on about prospects and candidates and vote tallies in the House, etc, then you may find this episode interesting. Otherwise, save your money and maintain an uninformed, romantic vision of Goldwater in your head, like I had before. What a disappointment. Oh well. Now I've warned you.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on May 14, 2013
The two discuss the conservative future and a little on the past. It is interesting because the topics discussed are still occurring today. The force of conservatives and their place in the Republican Party.
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on May 17, 2014
This series is very interesting. It has great leader talking about what they would do if they become leaders. Of most of the people interview had a profound effect on our world. It's fascinating to listen to them before they had an impact, almost spooky!!
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2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on March 28, 2009
This discussion between two congenial conservative doctrinaires contrasts sharply with today's "Meet the Press" gatherings, which feature Republican busybodies who cannot demonstrate the difference between themselves and used-car salesmen. Foreshadowing the medicare rigging by conscience-less idealogues from both parties in the 1980's that emburdened the middle class, Mr Goldwater comes off less the "extremist" the Mad.Avenue sharpies demonized than the patriarch of the conservative movement, rational and open-minded. In this exchange of views, Mr. Goldwater shrewdly predicts the 1968 choices and the rise of Reagan. Here they also predict such things as the concentration of the Executive powers and the nettlesome problem of civil rights legislation and the gathering media empires. If you pick up on the nightmare briefly touched upon, a president with extreme aims and political tone-deafness, you may think Goldwater had seen the looming Bush empire, that felt the concentration of Executive power and stolen votes confirm a mandate.Those were different times in 1966. That was when the U.S. took leadership seriously, politically and morally. But back then the politicians and the talk show hosts were interesting, probing and less chameleon-like with the camera running. It is no wonder today that most politicians seem as bland as soup cans. I am sure Mr. Rove took notes from this program, and with a dose of Orwell, ran to the Republican camp; for if you enumerate the topics touched upon, it will seem like the game plan for the next 20 years.
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on January 3, 2015
Great customer service! Great product!
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