Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your email address or mobile phone number.

Audible Sample
Playing...
Loading...
Paused

Firms of Endearment: How World-Class Companies Profit from Passion and Purpose Audible – Unabridged

4.4 out of 5 stars 53 customer reviews

See all 6 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Audible, Unabridged
"Please retry"
$0.00
Free with your Audible trial
Free with Audible trial
$0.00
Buy with 1-Click
$19.95

Sold and delivered by Audible, an Amazon company


Product Details

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Donald Mitchell HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on May 7, 2007
Format: Hardcover
What is a Firm of Endearment? The authors argue that their example companies share a common set of core values, policies, and operating attributes which include:

1. aligning the interests of all stakeholder groups (customers, employees, partners, investors, and society) rather than seeking profit optimization

2. below-average executive compensation

3. open-door policies

4. employee compensation and benefits are above average for their industry

5. above-average employee training

6. empower employees to satisfy customers

7. hire employees who are passionate about the company's purpose

8. humanize customer and employee experiences

9. enjoy below-average marketing costs

10. honor the spirit as well as the letter of laws

11. focus on corporate culture as a competitive advantage

12. are often innovative in their industries

Companies identified include extensive examples drawn from Commerce Bank, Container Store, Costco, Harley-Davidson, Honda, IDEO, IKEA, jetBlue, Johnson & Johnson, Jordan's Furniture, New Balance, Patagonia, Southwest Airlines, Starbucks, Timberland, Toyota, Trader Joe's, UPS, Wegmans, and Whole Foods.

These companies are often contrasted with Wal-Mart and the Good to Great Companies identified by Jim Collins in 2001 in terms of stock price growth.

The authors argue that there is a new level of consciousness emerging that rewards those who do good while doing well. The implication is that all firms should shift to stakeholder optimization and the cultural values identified in the example companies.
Read more ›
Comment 47 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
This book outlines a possible shift in the way people are thinking about their roles and purpose within the companies they work. Basically people are seeking more 'meaning' from their work and as a result companies are changing their basic assumptions and approaches in the field of people management.

The authors assert that changes in demographics, consumer knowledge and an ageing population (which is working longer) is moderating the effects of Hard Capitalism, which favoured shareholders, and introducing a more egalitarian form of Capitalism which favours all stake holders.

The theory is highly seductive and desirable, but the book did not provide any strong evidence to support these claims. They provide plenty of stories and examples to illustrate the theory in action, but it should not be presented as supporting evidence without considering those organisations that also have these 'Enlightened' traits but were nevertheless unsuccessful.

In addition it is not clear which form of employee policy comes first, could it be that only when a company is successful can it treat its employees better with higher wages and enlightened thinking? or will higher wages and an enlightened policy make a company successful?

This book provides a theory which you wish were true, but wishing does not make it so.
3 Comments 41 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
Overall, the authors overstate their case. It may be true that capitalism has entered a period of soul searching unparalleled since Adam Smith (p. 4). I believe it has. But the authors have not identified the elements of it, despite their claim that it is embodied in these firms of endearment. There is more going on with the soul of capitalism than what appears on these authors' radar screen.

I like how the authors frame the new elements and facets of a firm of endearment, in terms of Maslow, Fromm and Erikson - the human potentialists and transpersonalists par excellence. Yet, I am surprised that they conveniently ignore much of the work of these same psychologists regarding society and capitalism, esp. Fromm's. The very conditions of a market society preclude self actualization, according to Fromm. To use, for example, Fromm's principle of "a being society" to support their thesis is disingenuous. Sisodia et al only use the parts of human potential psychology that fit their materialist-positivist, neo-liberal perspective. It is white wash and a co-opting, e.g. "heart share." Heart share with soulfulness would result in profits being secondary. But Sisodia et al are making profits primary and seeking ways to "use" heart share as a means to gain those profits. It is positivism at best, exploitation at worst.

To think, as the authors do, that the cultures of Whole Foods, Southwest Air, Trader Joes and the others mentioned, are the paradigms of the new soul of capitalism is incomplete and misguided. At best, it is an expropriating of nicey nice terms that evoke what everyone wants, but superficially ignores root dynamics.
Read more ›
Comment 10 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Not read but want out of my reviews. There is no way to hide them. Amazon can keep or delete as they wish, but I would like it out of my review section. They can improve the feature to allow us to hide products we aren't ready to review.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews