Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

A First Glance at St. Thomas Aquinas: A Handbook for Peeping Thomists Hardcover – April 1, 1990


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$355.40 $150.00
--This text refers to the Paperback edition.

Customers Who Viewed This Item Also Viewed

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 192 pages
  • Publisher: Univ of Notre Dame Pr; First edition (April 1990)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0268009767
  • ISBN-13: 978-0268009762
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 5.9 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #9,272,389 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

“This is a superb introduction to the thought of St. Thomas Aquinas. It is so lucidly and wittily written that even a Thomistic novice like this reviewer quickly lost most of his apprehension and became absorbed in the broad and fascinating survey offered by the author.” —Homiletic and Pastoral Review


“McInerny has succeeded in making the thought of the Common Doctor accessible to the common man . . . the book is both clear and helpful. Thanks to Professor McInerny for having written this introduction to Saint Thomas's thought. It is the best available.” —The Canadian Catholic Review


“. . . Intended to be a ‘first, informal look into the vast world of St. Thomas Aquinas.’ Extensive bibliographical notes with additional suggested readings for each chapter are found at the end of the book. There is also a discussion of the various English translations available of Thomas’s writings. If a church library needs an introduction to the philosophy of St. Thomas Aquinas, this is a good one to buy.” —Church and Synagogue Libraries
--This text refers to the Paperback edition.

About the Author

Ralph McInerny (1929–2010) was Michael P. Grace Professor of Medieval Studies and director emeritus of the Jacques Maritain Center, University of Notre Dame. He was the author of numerous works in philosophy, literature, fiction, and journalism, including The Very Rich Hours of Jacques Maritain, Characters in Search of Their Author, and his autobiography, I Alone Have Escaped to Tell You, all published by the University of Notre Dame Press.
--This text refers to the Paperback edition.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

29 of 29 people found the following review helpful By W. Mark Smillie on November 11, 2003
Format: Paperback
It looks like this book will soon be relegated to the used book market only, but for a great introduction to the thought of St. Thomas Aquinas, in all its breadth, it is surely in the top 10. If you are looking for a leg up to tackling the saint yourself, this is the book for you. McInerny breaks the Saint's thought into topics, many of which are connected as the chapters progress. Each chapter is short and digestible--3 to 5 pages. Then a short selection in St. Thomas' own words: you are reading the man himself and understanding what he is talking about. It isn't a large, indepth study, but a great first step for neophyte thomists.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Bobby Bambino on May 4, 2012
Format: Paperback
Giving a Thomistic master like Ralph McInerny only 3 stars is boarder line grave matter, but hear me out. This is a good book, and I did learn a lot. I think it is more like 3.5 stars. I'll say some things I liked about it below, but here is my main problem with the book (and as I have come to realize, many books introducing the thought of Aquinas). It attempts to do waaaaay too much in a matter of less than 200 pages. Granted that the purpose of the book is only to give a little taste of Aquinas so that the reader will want to read other works. But my claim is that when it comes to the thought of Aquinas, this simply cannot be done. If I have learned anything from reading Ed Feser's masterful books, it is that you NEED to spend some serious time studying very carefully Aquinas's metaphysical assumptions before you can dive into his more complicated ideas about the existence of God, the attributes of God, the soul, etc. Without having struggled through Aquinas's metaphysics, one understands his proofs for the existence of God, for example, no better than the atheist who ends up "refuting" Aquinas's argument from motion because it is "contradicted" by Newton's 2nd law. I was able to follow much of McInery's book, but this is only because I already knew what Aquinas meant by terms like essence, motion, potency, final cause, etc. These terms are used either by McInery himself or when he quotes sections from Aristotle and Aquinas in the book. Perhaps I am slow, but I do not think that one can give a quick working definition of these terms and then simply go to town with them. Whole chapters of books (like Feser's 'Aquinas') need to be devoted just to unpacking Aquinas's metaphysical language.Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Marcelo A. D'asero on August 1, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Ralph McInerny's "A First Glance at St. Thomas Aquinas" is truly a very good "first glance." The book is an excellent introduction for undergraduates and autodidacts to the principal philosophical positions held by St. Thomas. It should, however, be closely followed by a reading of Edward Feser's "Aquinas," along with "Aquinas 101," by Francis John Selman. These three texts together offer (i) a solid grounding in the basics of Aquinas, (ii) undo the misinformation about Aquinas that is normally offered in university survey of philosophy courses, and (iii) prepare the reader for more advanced study in "The Thought of Thomas Aquinas," by Brian Davies, and in "Reality: A Synthesis of Thomistic Thought," by Reginald Garrigou-Lagrange. Of course, the three texts will facilitate the reading of St. Thomas's primary sources as well.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?