Buy Used
$3.99
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Eligible for Amazon's FREE Super Saver/Prime Shipping, 24/7 Customer Service, and package tracking. 100% Satisfaction Guarantee. Dust jacket in Has dustjacket condition.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

First Meetings: Three Stories from the Enderverse Hardcover – July 1, 2002


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$48.14 $0.01
Take%20an%20Extra%2030%25%20Off%20Any%20Book

Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • Take an Extra 30% Off Any Book: Use promo code HOLIDAY30 at checkout to get an extra 30% off any book for a limited time. Excludes Kindle eBooks and Audible Audiobooks. Restrictions apply. Learn more.


NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Year
Best Books of 2014
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2014's Best Books of the Year in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 149 pages
  • Publisher: Subterranean Press; First Edition edition (July 1, 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1931081697
  • ISBN-13: 978-1931081696
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 5.5 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,632,842 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

A quarter century after the world first learned that "the enemy's gate is down" in Card's groundbreaking "Ender's Game," comes a collection bringing together that novelette with two more recent stories that expand on the concepts and philosophies bound up in the story of Ender, the uncannily brilliant boy who is forced to sacrifice himself to save the world from alien "Buggers." "The Polish Boy" a previously unpublished tale of how Ender's father, John Paul, at the age of five manipulated Captain Graff of the International Fleet into saving his "noncompliant" family showcases Card's talent at developing the inner life of a character. John Paul possesses a mind that marries a child's lack of worldly experience with a preternatural sense of the people and goings on around him. "The Investment Counselor," a fun if relatively slight story, explains how the AI named Jane first formally introduced herself to Ender. As for "Ender's Game," even those who are intimately familiar with the concepts of the Game from later Ender books will be struck anew by Card's virtuosity. His powerful voice and startlingly clear vision will draw many new readers into a lifelong love of science fiction. This accessible collection will impress even non-sci-fi buffs, besides being a must-have for Ender saga devotees.Hugo in 1977 and in its better known book form the story collected both Hugo and Nebula awards in 1985.
Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information, Inc.

From Booklist

No continuing characters in sf are more fascinating than those Card introduced in the 1977 story "Ender's Game" and developed in the award-winning novel of the same name and its six sequels. Here that story reappears, accompanied by two recently written ones set, respectively, 30-odd years before and well after the events of their great progenitor. In "The Polish Boy," recruiters for the Battle School in which "Ender's Game" occurs come to screen a poor Catholic professor's precocious offspring and decide that the best prospect among them, though he will never attend Battle School, bears continued watching. In "Investment Counselor," Ender has attained age 20 and must pay taxes; almost unimaginably wealthy from investments begun for him when he was Earth's 12-year-old savior, he needs help and gets it from an uncannily knowledgeable software program. Like "Ender's Game," which concludes this book, these stories demonstrate the assured scene setting, apparently effortlessly sustained suspense, and moral preoccupation with the responsibilities of kinship and friendship that distinguish Ender's entire saga. Ray Olson
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved

More About the Author

Orson Scott Card is the bestselling author best known for the classic Ender's Game, Ender's Shadow and other novels in the Ender universe. Most recently, he was awarded the 2008 Margaret A. Edwards Award for lifetime achievement in Young Adult literature, from the American Library Association. Card has written sixty-one books, assorted plays, comics, and essays and newspaper columns. His work has won multiple awards, including back-to-back wins of the Hugo and the Nebula Awards-the only author to have done so in consecutive years. His titles have also landed on 'best of' lists and been adopted by cities, universities and libraries for reading programs. The Ender novels have inspired a Marvel Comics series, a forthcoming video game from Chair Entertainment, and pre-production on a film version. A highly anticipated The Authorized Ender Companion, written by Jake Black, is also forthcoming.Card offers writing workshops from time to time and occasionally teaches writing and literature at universities.Orson Scott Card currently lives with his family in Greensboro, NC.

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
5 star
3
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 4 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Michael Scott on December 4, 2002
Format: Hardcover
The chief attraction of this collection is that you can finally have ALL of the Ender stories in hardcover on your bookshelf. That and the enjoyable stories.
"Ender's Game" is the Hugo-nominated novelette that served as the basis for Card' sprawling Ender series. The short story begins when Ender is in Battle School, whereas the novel begins much earlier. Both stories tell the same tale, but the short contained herein is a superb short story.
"Investment Counselor" was previously published in Robert Silverberg's 'Far Horizons' anthology. This story relates how Ender first met Jane, the artificial intelligence that is his constant companion in several books of the series. This is an enjoyable story that was unjustly criticized by several reviewers in its initial publication.
"The Polish Boy" is original to this collection. It's the interesting story of Ender's father's childhood. It tells an entertaining story, but I'm not sure exactly what Card is trying to do here. Why did this story need to be told? It doesn't seem to fit into the Ender stories. We learn that Ender's father was a precocious child from a large family. We see a bit of the history behind the Hegemony, the worldwide government that has fallen into disarray by the time "Ender's Game" occurs. We learn how Ender's family arrived in the United States. The story of a precocious young child has been told better by Card in "Ender's Game" and "Mikal's Songbird". I can only assume that the story was written to fill-in the Ender univese for devotees of the series. As such, it's an enjoyable piece of work.
As a whole, this is a nice collection. The stories range from excellent to enjoyable, a spectrum that many authors would love to have! Outside of my reservations regarding "The Polish Boy", this is a very entertaining collection.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By J. Chovan on September 12, 2002
Format: Hardcover
This small book contains jems from the Enderverse. Included is the version of Ender's Game that appeared in an Analog magazine in 1977 and introduced us to Ender, Buggers, and Battle School. It is a very fun read and it is amazing to see how the story expanded to novel form. A second short story included in the book is called Investment Counselor. This story introduces Jane, Ender's living computer friend, to Ender as he is traveling on a colony ship. Again, the story is short and fun. Finally, the third story in this book is called the Polish Boy. Readers will see Ender's father as a young boy living in noncompliant Poland. A young International Fleet officer named Graff (ring a bell, Ender fans?) plays a role in guiding this young child's future before Ender was even a twinkle in his father's eye. Overall, this book is a good additional collection of information relating to Ender. While not necessary to understand the other novels, they do add tidbits of information that makes the Enderverse all that much more enjoyable. I highly recommend it. Signed copies are available at Orson Scott Card's official web page-hatrack.com
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Hardcover
Orson Scott Card joins the ranks of the fantasy/SF authors who have written a book of short stories set in their best-loved universe. "First Meetings" is a nice accompanying book for the Ender series or its "Shadow" spinoffs.
"The Polish Boy" is the tale of Ender Wiggin's father, John Paul. John Paul is a precocious Polish Catholic child (five and a half) whose parents haven't noticed his unusual intelligence. But a government tester does, and soon a tug-of-war begins between his parents and the people who want to reshape him into a battle strategist.
"Investment Counselor" is a "plug the hole" type of story. It's been years since the events of "Ender's Game," and Ender is travelling the stars. He also has turned twenty, and there's a slight problem concerning the whole tax thing. The one to help him? An artificial intelligence named Jane -- a familiar figure to fans of the Ender series.
And the third story is the original "Ender's Game," a short story published in the late 70s, that produced the idea of the Battle school, genius children Ender and Bean, and a sort of microcosm of the eventual epic series that Card has since written.
It's a smal book, only about 150 pages, but Card never tries to flesh it out too much. It's the content of the stories that really makes it worth the buy, because of what he does with them. "Boy" adds an extra dimension to Ender's father and the situations that came years later. "Investment" is a nice bit of backstory, with a slightly humorous tone that makes it lighter than the books. And "Ender's Game" (the short story) is merely pleasant to read because it's nice to see how this short story blossomed and expanded.
Fans of Card will not be disappointed by this well-written, interesting collection of stories. This is the kind of SF I like to read.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Book in great shape and timely in arrival. I have finished the first story and it is Card's usual good work.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?