First Step

September 10, 1993 | Format: MP3

$9.49
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
4:08
30
2
4:57
30
3
3:18
30
4
5:43
30
5
5:58
30
6
4:19
30
7
4:27
30
8
4:09
30
9
5:02
30
10
5:44

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Product Details

  • Original Release Date: September 10, 1993
  • Release Date: September 10, 1993
  • Label: Rhino
  • Copyright: 1970 Warner Brothers Records
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 47:45
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001PJ472M
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (20 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #70,013 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

44 of 47 people found the following review helpful By David Kinney on January 13, 2001
Format: Audio CD
I had real high hopes for this band when I was a 15 year old in 1970.Being a devoted Small Faces and Jeff Beck Group fan I truly believed the musical marriage of McLagen,Lane and Jones with Mr. Stewart and Mr. Wood would result in a "supergroup" that was actually both super and a group.I guess what I ended up with was more like a minor league Stones without all the drama and baggage those guys were totin' around at the time. But it's okay because, just as attending a minor league baseball game can be a more intimate and enjoyable experience than watching the big leagues sometimes,The Faces are just out to entertain you here.No serious messages(not even the Meher Baba inspired "Stone" should be taken too seriously).They're just four very talented journeyman musicians and one soon -to- be- superstar peacock havin' some laughs and lager. Listening to the CD these days makes me very nostalgic for those innocent first days of this band ,and truth be told, nostalgia probably made me add a star to the rating. But I can wholeheartedly recommend the following cuts on the record ;"Wicked Messenger","Three Button Hand Me Down" "The Monkey and the Pineapple"(as close to Booker T. as any limey band ever got), and the aforementioned Ronnie Lane ditty "Stone".The rest of the album is merely good early seventies British rock which means it is better than 90% of the stuff coming off of of that island these days...so Faces fans, Stewart fans(this is when he was good ya'll)...buy this record and take that first step with me.
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful By MaxGomez on August 6, 2004
Format: Audio CD
Around the Plynth alone makes this disc worth the purchase price. Suggested companion disc: Rod Stewart's Gasoline Alley.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Bill Your 'Free Form FM Print DJ on August 30, 2010
Format: Audio CD
Long before Rod Stewart sold out with disco singles like "Do You Think I'm Sexy," in fact long before disco at all, he was making fantastic British Rock with first the Jeff Beck Group, than the Faces, which he hooked up with as they grew from being the Small Faces.

You probably won't recognize any of this wonderfully organic, blues based rock. But the organ, biting guitar, and fantastic bass work made this music some of the most genuine and sincere rock and roll of the very early 1970s. If Serpent Power and the Doors and Lothar And The Hand People were the dark tunnels of 3am early FM radio in America, the Faces were the daylight, for the daytime. Too ambitious for Top 40 AM.

I came to this not knowing any of this music and that is a great advantage. With "classic rock" being great music that has been played out, it is wonderful to know there is still that which flaked off as free form FM became playlisted AOR.

It is there to be discovered all over again. Start here.
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11 of 14 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 9, 2000
Format: Audio CD
When Rod Stewart joined the Small Faces on this album, who would have guessed what was to come. This is the mixed birth of Honky Tonk, Blues, early Funk and a smidgen of Folk music. There are heavy riffs, honky tonk piano's and a gravely blues voice that would become as big a part of rock music as any has so far.
Anyone who loves to shimmy and shake across the floor to later Rod Stewart " Hot Legs" or Ronnie Wood and the Stones needs to score this CD and see where it originated. A must have.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Thirty-Ought Six on January 11, 2012
Format: Audio CD
Anyone whom is familiar with late sixties British Blues/Rock knows fairly well the interchanging circles within various musicians of the time period. Steve Marriott had left the Small Faces and formed Humble Pie with Peter Frampton(ex-Herd) and Greg Ridley(ex-Spooky Tooth). Rod Stewart and Ron Wood had served their formative time with Jeff Beck and due to the guitarist's unfortunate auto accident, JBG had ceased operating as a functional unit. Enter Ronnie Lane, Ian McLagan and Kenney Jones whom were looking for a guitarist/singer to replace the hole left by Marriott; what they got were a pair of erstwhile, kindred spirits whom actually transformed the group into something a bit different from Steve's tenure within the group. Holding onto the old moniker of "Small Faces" for this debut(mostly out of respect for the former incarnation, coupled with possible record company pressure for projected album sales), from the opening organ strains of Dylan's Wicked Messenger through onto the album's rockin' groovin' closer Three Button Hand Me Down, First Step is, in fact, quite something different from the Small Faces of old.

With the new guard of Stewart and Wood coming into the ranks, Ronnie Lane suddenly has yet another angle to work his songwriting ideas into shape and tracks like Devotion, Nobody Knows and Flying are testimony to this newfound chemistry. Rod Stewart's vocal style is a catalyst not only for his budding parallel solo career, but provides a totally unique style for this band to project their own sound and the ability to move forward artisically. Shake, Shudder is a gritty blues rocker and allows Wood to show his guitar wares while exposing Stewart's powerful pipes and thus proves the power of this Faces sonically charged musical machine.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By J. Bynum on December 13, 2011
Format: Audio CD
Small Faces (Faces) / First Step: This is the first album that Small Faces (who would soon change their name to simply, "Faces") had finished with Ron Wood and Rod Stewart in the lineup. Their version of Bob Dylan's "Wicked Messenger" is amazing. The rest of the album is good, but never rises above the first cut. A nice four-star release.
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