Customer Reviews


37 Reviews
5 star:
 (26)
4 star:
 (8)
3 star:
 (2)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:
 (1)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favorable review
The most helpful critical review


33 of 37 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Self concensus at work
An email friend used the term "self consensus" to describe the process by which we start with a known person- ourselves- and move in small steps away from that to construct our image of another person we know via email. This book is a good illustration of that idea.

The story is about a minnow and a tadpole. They look alike, so they must be alike, right? The...
Published on May 3, 2005 by Catherine Hallberg

versus
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Fish is fish
My great- grandson really liked this book. It is a fun story, good for the three-year old mind.
We enjoyed it very much.
Published 14 months ago by Phyllis Moses


‹ Previous | 1 2 3 4 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

33 of 37 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Self concensus at work, May 3, 2005
This review is from: Fish is Fish (Paperback)
An email friend used the term "self consensus" to describe the process by which we start with a known person- ourselves- and move in small steps away from that to construct our image of another person we know via email. This book is a good illustration of that idea.

The story is about a minnow and a tadpole. They look alike, so they must be alike, right? The frog wakes up to having grown legs and the fish is astounded- this cannot be! They are both fish! Time goes on and the fish grows into a larger fish and the tadpole into a frog. Finally the frog is able to leave the pond, but eventually he returns to tell his old friend about the world. The fish pictures the birds as colorful fish with wings, the cow as a hilarious furry fish with horns and udders and the people as fish in clothing with hair. Of course the fish wants to see these amazing things so he jumps out, only to discover that he really needs to be in his cool, watery element to survive.

The illustrations are fairly simple colored pencil drawings- at least until we get to the creatures outside the pond. My children found the "birds" interesting, but the cow and the humans had them in stitches. They found those critters to be some of the funniest things they can imagine- and my 8 yo was able to understand and articulate that we base our assumptions on what we already know and understand. A pretty good lesson for kids to learn, IMO, as well as a sweet story of friendship between two very different creatures.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Delightful Book, August 6, 2003
This review is from: Fish is Fish (Paperback)
FISH IS FISH is a delightful book. It's fun for children, and a pleasure for adults to read out loud. The illustrations are beautiful. Two young "fish" are friends. One fish stays a fish; the other turns out to be a tadpole. The real fish refuses to believe that his friend is changing. How like real life! After tadpole goes up on land, he actually has more to add to their friendship - great stories about what he has seen on earth! When fish jumps onto land to explore, he almost dies. Tadpole saves him. In the end, both fish and tadpole are happy with their own unique worlds. Fish tells tadpole: "You were right ... Fish is fish." This story is so simply and wonderfully symbolic of how friends can remain friends, even when they change as they grow up.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fish is Fish as Epistemological Primer, September 10, 2004
By 
This review is from: Fish is Fish (Paperback)
Fish Is Fish (Lionni, 1970) describes a fish who is keenly interested in learning about what happens on land, but the fish cannot explore land because it can only breathe in water. It befriends a tadpole who grows into a frog and eventually goes out onto the land. The frog returns to the pond a few weeks later and reports on what he has seen. The frog describes all kinds of things like birds, cows, and people. The book shows pictures of the fish's representations of each of these descriptions: each is a fish-like form that is slightly adapted to accommodate the frog's descriptions--people are imagined to be fish who walk on their tailfins, birds are fish with wings, cows are fish with udders. This tale illustrates both the creative opportunities and dangers inherent in the fact that people construct new knowledge based on their current knowledge.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Things are not always what they seem, March 25, 2000
By A Customer
The book's message--sometimes what is best for you is right before your eyes. This book teaches basic information about frogs and fish. It has beautiful colors which captivate the children's imagination and interest. Thoughtfully and creatively written, one of my favorite Leo Lionni books. This is a book which captivates the interest of chldren of all ages. My pre-school age children love this book, as does the elementary age children in my classroom.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


14 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Beautoful and Subtle. I Love This Book!, September 4, 2000
By 
Judy "Judy" (Smalltown, USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Fish is Fish (Paperback)
This fanciful and colorful book is about a fish and tadpole who become friends while living in the same pond. Tadpole soon grows legs and leaves the pond. Fish is lonely without him and tries to follow. Disaster! The gently presented lessons in this book stir me still. The words are simple, but the meaning, real and multi-faceted, is accessible to all ages.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Fish and Frog, March 20, 2007
A Kid's Review
This review is from: Fish is fish (Paperback)
Fish is Fish by Leo Lionni is a great book for little kids with great imaginations. In this book a tadpole and a fish are friends. There are many things to learn from this book. I believe that this book should be read by little kids.

The pictures in this book are creative. The pictures are made from imagination. But, it might be better if he used the right colors. The book would really stand out to little kids. Little kids and beginners would love this book for its pictures. It has easy words for beginners to practice reading with.

Their friendship will make you happy even if you're really angry since nothing is better than friendship. For instance, frog left for a long time and eventually returned and fish was not mad. When he came back, he told amazing stories. The story wouldn't be complete without their friendship.

After a day with joy and frustration fish learns, "Frogs are frogs," and "Fish are fish." Fish risked his life to see what frog had described to him. Frog proved to be a hero and a friend. Fish learned a valuable lesson. Frog and fish remained friends.

Fish is Fish is something I definitely recommend. Young kids who are mad at a friend should totally read it. With all the happy events it makes it to a book that's great for friends. I liked how the author put the events in the way he did. Beginning readers should really read this book.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Writing well done, illustrations rather drab, but children enjoyed, July 30, 2010
This review is from: Fish is Fish (Paperback)
A tadpole and a minnow grow up together, thinking they both are fish. But one day, the tadpole begins to sprout legs and realizes that he's a frog. After arguing with his friend who is reluctant to believe him, the tadpole declares "Frogs are frogs and fish is fish and that's that!" Eventually, the day comes when the tadpole is a frog and must leave the water and his friend. Weeks later, he returns to visit and tells his friend about all the wonders he's seen, such as birds, which the minnow pictures as fish with wings stuck on them, and so on. These images stay in the minnow's mind, and the grass seems greener, so to speak, outside of his pond. The fish jumps on land, only to discover that he is not made to live outside of water. His friend helps him back in, and as the water revives him, the minnow looks around his home anew and decides to be content with his home.

The writing in this book is quite well done. It contains both humor and life lessons that can be easily explained to a preschool-aged child. Contentment, each having our own purpose/design, etc. The color illustrations are rather plain for my tastes, with the exception of the minnow's imaginings about the creatures described, which are very bright by comparison.

This book was given to my daughter for her 5th birthday. She says she'd rate it a 10 out of 10, and her 7-year-old sister says she'd give a 9 out of 10. They both do enjoy hearing it read. It's not one of their top 5 books, but it's one that they enjoy hearing from time to time. As for my experience as a parent reading it, I don't enjoy reading it in the way I do some of my favorite, but it's not a chore either. Overall, I would recommend this book if it sounds like one you and your child would enjoy.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Dramatic and Funny Story about a Fish Out of Water, August 4, 2009
This review is from: Fish is Fish (Paperback)
A baby fish and a tadpole in a pond become friends. When the tadpole grows into a frog, he leaves the water to explore the land above. Upon hearing from his friend about this wondrous world, the fish decides to go see it. But he leaves the water at his peril, only to be rescued just in time by the frog.

This is not a moralistic story, but it lays some groundwork for an understanding of what constitutes truth. This especially relates to the postmodern idea that reality (especially spiritual reality) is whatever we perceive it to be. In this story the fish imagines birds, cows, humans, and other animals as fish-shaped beings. His perception does not alter the true form of birds, cows, humans and other animals -- and chortling children will understand this as the fish's funny conceptions are juxtaposed with reality.

The point is driven home not only with humor but also with dramatic tension. Although the fish perceives the world above as a place where he can thrive, he is proven wrong when he attempts to breathe air. After returning to his own environment, he admits that "fish is fish" and accepts his place in the pond. So the story dramatizes the truth that there are certain laws inherent in the created order, and that to ignore them is dangerous.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars It is easy to see why it has won all the awards that it has, August 12, 2013
This review is from: Fish is Fish (Paperback)
Fish is Fish tells the story of two young friends - one is a fish, and the other is a tadpole. When young, they had so very much in common. However, when the tadpole grew up to be a frog, he returned to fish and told him so many interesting stories of the new world he lived in. Fish hungered to see this other world, but found that it was just not for him. He was not a frog, but a fish, and fish is fish.

This book is different than many children's books that I have seen. The author, Leo Lionni had a background that was rich beyond imagination. His father was a Sephardic Jew and his mother an opera singer, and his wife was the daughter of a leading Italian Communist. So, I don't think that this book is about not bettering yourself, or staying where you were born. Instead, I think that this book is finding where you feel you best fit, and being happy there, whether you are the frog OR the fish.

This is a very nice book, and it is easy to see why it has won all the awards that it has. I liked the illustration work, which is quite humorous and really grabs the young reader's eye. My young reader and both enjoyed this book and highly recommend it. Check it out and see what everyone is talking about!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Usefull, November 26, 2012
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Fish is Fish (Paperback)
I found this book very useful into my work with people... it helps to see how our mind works and how the interpretation of the reality is based in our preconceptions or the way we see the world. It invites to be open mind. Additionally, it helps to reflect on our acceptation of our reality.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 3 4 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

Details

Fish is Fish
Fish is Fish by Leo Lionni (Paperback - February 12, 1974)
$6.99
In Stock
Add to cart Add to wishlist
Search these reviews only
Send us feedback How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you? Let us know here.