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Product Details

  • Paperback: 324 pages
  • Publisher: Killustrated (August 19, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0615497063
  • ISBN-13: 978-0615497068
  • Product Dimensions: 10 x 8 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.8 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (16 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #345,638 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
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Full of great information.
Jornel
I've been strength training using the starting strength program (great program!)
D. Klopp
A must read for anyone looking to get serious about fitness.
cscs

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

49 of 52 people found the following review helpful By I. Mehr on September 8, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
As an avid CrossFitter with a strength bias, I really liked this book. There were several things I learned that I have not yet gleaned from two years of watching CF Journal vids and reading articles. Anyone into high intensity fitness, strength training, or endurance training (although I pretty much skipped that chapter as I hate any kind of endurance with a passion you can only dream of), will find this a useful book. I think it would be particularly beneficial to a newbie to CrossFit to get some of the fundamental underpinnings of the programing. FWIW, Kilgore has written for the CFJ several times. Also, Justin Lascek runs a great website called 70sBig.com. Somewhat surprisingly, they avoided the word "CrossFit" like the plague (I think it was mentioned twice), as well as some of the CF classic rep schemes (think 20-15-10 instead of 21-15-9). I suppose this means the book is not sanctioned nor suggested by CrossFit HQ, and they do contradict some CF gospel in here, but that's a good thing: nobody should get their fitness and health info from only one source. All in all, a great book.
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful By George S. Christiansen on September 17, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I was really looking forward to this book.

I am familiar with Lon Kilgore from his book with Mark Rippetoe, Practical Programming for Strength Training, 2nd edition, which is one of the best books of it's kind available. I am also familiar with Justin Lascek via his site 70's Big. I like both of these writers other works and was expecting something of similar caliber. I've read a very small amount of stuff by Michael Hartman, but not enough to have a real opinion on him or his work.

I was pretty disappointed.

The pros:
I really appreciate their attempt to tackle a broad range of what makes up fitness: Strength, Endurance, and Mobility. Practical Programming is the best book I have read on strength training, but, for good reason, barely touches on the other two categories. Overall I think most of the information is spot on and that the authors provide a practical and efficient way to apply it.

The strength chapter does a great job of not compromising the fact that Barbell training is the best method for it's development, but also being realistic about what equipment people may have available and providing programming that works within that framework. I also really loved the addition of another way to do resets on a linear progression than what I was familiar with.

The chapter on Endurance does a good job of pointing out, from scientific literature, what actually drives it and, if applied, would save a lot of people from spending so much of their training doing "junk" miles.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Daevid on May 18, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I'll keep this short, this is a must read for anyone interested in improving their fitness.
It covers basic strength training, cardio, and endurance training, along with simple, yet scientifically backed explanations of why you should do what the book tells you.
It's not dogmatic or based on any fads, it's the real deal and contains so much valuable information.
Buy it. Read it. Do it.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By D. Klopp on October 22, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Very interesting and informative book on how to become fit. I've been strength training using the starting strength program (great program!) for the past couple years and I wanted to start some conditioning work. This book outlines how to do this in the areas of strength, endurance and mobility. It does a good job explaining movements and/or exercises to do, frequency, and intensity. I liked how it explained how to make progress in conditioning depending on your fitness level - sedentary, weak, strong or applied fitness trainees. It also explains the best way to improve your conditioning so that it has minimum impact on your strength.
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Josh Goode on September 25, 2011
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This is an excellent book and I highly recommend it to all those who are looking to improve their training. It has detailed scientific explanations of training theories, but also has simple, easy to understand explanations and numerous model training programs for different goals. I am very happy I bought the book!
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30 of 45 people found the following review helpful By Paul Skavland on November 29, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I'm giving this book two stars because it wasn't what I wanted. However, I have to be fair and say it IS an excellent book, if you're looking for a technical manual.

I already own "Starting Strength" and "Practical Programming" by Rippetoe and I was hoping this book would be more like that. Instead it's got all of the technical explanations but is lacking the real-world routines and examples found in "Practical Programming."

I really wanted some spelled-out examples of different kinds of training plans, etc. but there were very few. In fact, the book often refers to Starting Strength and/or Practical Programming as suggested reading for these examples, so I felt like this book was incomplete.
Practical Programming had pages of examples of say, the Texas Method and the Starr Method, with example "workout logs" etc in the back. Without more examples like that in this book I feel a little lost as to how to apply all this information I just read. So, if you're less of an academic type and more of a "what should I DO?" type I would skip this book.
To quote Bruce Lee, "Knowing is not enough, we must apply." If I don't know what to DO with this information, it's not that useful to me. Maybe some other readers will get good ideas from this book they can use in their own training, but I had a hard time.

UPDATE: 4/19/2013

I upgraded my review from two stars to three. Since I really only had one complaint about the book perhaps I was too harsh, there is a lot of quality information in here and just because *I* wasn't sure how to use it doesn't mean others won't get something out of it.
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