Five Minds for the Future and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Five Minds for the Future (Leadership for the Common Good) Hardcover – April 3, 2007

ISBN-13: 978-1591399124 ISBN-10: 1591399122 Edition: 1st

44 New from $5.01 71 Used from $3.99 2 Collectible from $14.95
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$5.01 $3.99

Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student



NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Save up to 90% on Textbooks
Rent textbooks, buy textbooks, or get up to 80% back when you sell us your books. Shop Now

Product Details

  • Series: Leadership for the Common Good
  • Hardcover: 196 pages
  • Publisher: Harvard Business Review Press; 1 edition (April 3, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1591399122
  • ISBN-13: 978-1591399124
  • Product Dimensions: 6.1 x 9.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (55 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #52,554 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Starred Review. Psychologist, author and Harvard professor Gardner (Multiple Intelligences: New Horizons) has put together a thought-provoking, visionary attempt to delineate the kinds of mental abilities ("minds") that will be critical to success in a 21st century landscape of accelerating change and information overload. Gardner's five minds-disciplined, synthesizing, creating, respectful and ethical-are not personality types, but ways of thinking available to anyone who invests the time and effort to cultivate them: "how we should use our minds." In presenting his "values enterprise," Gardner uses a variety of explanatory models, from developmental psychology to group dynamics, demonstrating their utility not just for individual development, but for tangible success in a full range of human endeavors, including education, business, science, art, politics and engineering. A tall order for a single work, Gardner avoids overly-technical arguments as well as breezy generalizations, putting to fine use his twenty years experience as a cognitive science researcher, author and educator, and proving his world-class reputation well-earned. Though specialists might wish Gardner dug a bit more into the research, most readers will find the book lively and engaging, like the fascinating lectures of a seasoned, beloved prof.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Review

"...a detailed and thoughtful description of the multifaceted brains that are likely to be most valued in the coming decades." --BusinessWeek, May 7, 2007

More About the Author

Howard Gardner is the Hobbs Professor of Cognition and Education at the Harvard Graduate School of Education.

Customer Reviews

A book worth reading and rereading.
Richard C. Dorf
Gardner notes that the five "minds" he examines in this book are different from the eight or nine human intelligences that he examines in his earlier works.
Robert Morris
His writing is also exceptionally clear and the book is very well organized.
Irfan A. Alvi

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

207 of 214 people found the following review helpful By Robert Morris HALL OF FAMETOP 100 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on April 19, 2007
Format: Hardcover
I have read and reviewed all of Howard Gardner's previous books and consider this, his latest, to be the most valuable thus far. In it, he identifies and explains five separate but related combinations of cognitive abilities that are needed to "thrive in the world during eras to come...[cognitive abilities] which we should develop in the future." Gardner refers to them as "minds" but they are really mindsets. Mastery of each enables a person:

1. to know how to work steadily over time to improve skill and understanding;

2. to take information from disparate sources and make sense of it by understanding and evaluating that information objectively;

3. by building on discipline and synthesis, to break new ground;

4. by "recognizing that nowadays one can no longer remain within one's shell or one's home territory," to note and welcome differences between human individuals and between human groups so as to understand them and work effectively with them;

5. and finally, "proceeding on a level more abstract than the respectful mind," to reflect on the nature of one's work and the needs and desires of the society in which one lives.

Gardner notes that the five "minds" he examines in this book are different from the eight or nine human intelligences that he examines in his earlier works. "Rather than being distinct computational capabilities, they are better thought of as broad uses of the mind that we can cultivate at school, in professions, or at the workplace."

The "future" to which the title of this book refers is the future that awaits each of us. That is, Gardner is not a futurist in the sense that others such as Ossip K. Flechteim, Bertrand de Jouvenel, Dennis Gabor, Alvin Toffler, and Peter Schwartz are.
Read more ›
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
88 of 91 people found the following review helpful By Jesse Kornbluth TOP 500 REVIEWER on May 15, 2007
Format: Hardcover
In case you haven't noticed, the world is going through a seismic change. No one can say what the human experiment will look like on the other side, but I think we may reasonably conclude this --- the badly educated will suffer.

And by "suffer" I don't mean the old chart that shows you how much more a college graduate earns over the course of a lifetime than a high school grad.

In this new world, a college graduate who lacks what Howard Gardner calls "multiple intelligences" will be in the same boat as the high school dropout collecting an hourly wage at Jiffy Lube.

So a book that outlines the kind of smarts the future will require --- and reward --- automatically merits our attention. And we read more closely when the author is Howard Gardner, who has made a career of this subject at Harvard and collected a MacArthur Prize Fellowship along the way.

Who needs the "five minds" that Gardner discusses in this brief (167 pages), jargon-free book?

Well, you, for starters, because knowledge is expanding exponentially each year and if you are not actively engaged in some kind of lifelong learning, you are condemning yourself to the glue factory.

And, of course, your kids, because as sure as "the children are our future," they must learn to survive in a world far more demanding than ours.

So without conscious, continuing, multi-disciplinary education, it looks grim for you and your kids.

What "minds" does Gardner say you need to master?

1)The disciplined mind. Learn at least one discipline --- a ten-year process --- or you're "destined to march to someone else's tune."

2)The synthesizing mind.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Hardcover
I will admit it; I chose this book by its title as I was looking for some insight into the types of skills required of the next generation. Five minds for the future (FMFTF) projects the observation that there are five types of intelligence or Minds out there. This observation and the classification of these types of intelligence is Gardner's claim to fame. The types are:

The Disciplined Mind - one that knows something and has mastery over a subject. Such mastery takes 10 years to develop. Here Gardner separates rote knowledge with being able to think deeply about what you are doing. This is a great point and one that more executives need to take into account as it is a major difference between people who are good individual contributors and those that make great managers. Gardner believes that the disciplines worth learning are by in large academic in nature, paying little attention to other disciplines or types of acquired knowledge.

The Synthesizing Mind -- one who knows how to sort through information, identify seminaries and trends and produce a big picture? Gardner points out that this skill is becoming more important given the flood of information and conflicting information that is the status quo of a modern connected society.

The Creating Mind -- one who is able to generate new things, see from new perspectives and formulation new ideas. Here represents a reversal and a revolution as creativity was often suppressed in the past and reinforced with rote learning etc. Now Gardner points out that creativity is key to individual and societal survival. He also points out that it is possible to create creativity in individual - this is a significant departure from other work that believes creativity is an inherent rather than learned trait.
Read more ›
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?