Five Minutes of Heaven 2009 R CC

Amazon Instant Video

(468) IMDb 6.7/10
Available in HD
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WINNER! World Cinema Directing/Screenwriting prizes at Sundance. Intense political thriller inspired by true events, starring Liam Neeson and directed by the Oscar-nominated director of DOWNFALL.

Starring:
Liam Neeson, James Nesbitt
Runtime:
1 hour 30 minutes

Available in HD on supported devices.

Five Minutes of Heaven

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Product Details

Genres Drama
Director Oliver Hirschbiegel
Starring Liam Neeson, James Nesbitt
Supporting actors Niamh Cusack, Mathew McElhinney, Conor MacNeill, Paul Garrett, Kevin O'Neill, Gerard Jordan, Paula McFetridge, Gerry Doherty, Luke O'Reilly, Luke McEvoy, Aoibheann Biddle, Ruth Matthewson, Carol Moore, James Nesbitt, Barry McEvoy, Liam Neeson, Richard Orr, Richard Dormer
Studio IFC Films
MPAA rating R (Restricted)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Customer Reviews

A very well made movie with great acting from a fine cast.
c p hornby
One problem is that at times the dialogue can be difficult to understand due to the accents of some of the players.
norm
It was too slow getting started and I never got interested enough to continue watching.
Barb in Colorado

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

349 of 361 people found the following review helpful By Grady Harp HALL OF FAMETOP 100 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on January 19, 2010
Format: DVD
When friend Vika (Anamaria Marinca) asks Joe Griffen (James Nesbitt), the brother of a man killed in 1975 by one Alistair Little (Liam Neeson), if killing Alistair would not be good for him, Joe replies ' Not good for me? My five minutes of heaven!' And so runs the razor sharp dialog and acting and power of this little film from the UK that relates the story of a 1975 event in Northern Ireland when Catholics and Protestants were at war and the young Protestant Alistair Little (Mark David), as a UVF member (Ulster Volunteer Force), gathers his friends and 'kills a Catholic' - but the murder happens in front of the victim's 11-year-old brother Joe Griffen. Flash forward to 2008 when Alistair Little (now Liam Neeson) has served his prison term and is set up by the media to relate the story of the incident and supposedly meet and shake hands on camera with the now mature Joe Griffen. It is a film about youthful involvement in terrorism and the sequelae that haunts or obsesses the victim's family and the perpetrator. The confrontation between Alistair and Joe is a devastating one.

Guy Hibbert wrote this excruciatingly visceral screenplay and Oliver Hirschbiegel directs a first rate cast. Though Liam Neeson is billed as the star, the film belongs to the powerful acting by James Nesbitt as the vengeful Joe Griffen. The cinematography is dark and dank like the atmosphere in both the warring fog of 1975 and the attempt at reconciliation in 2008. There are subtle pieces of thoughtful enhancement, such as the use of the Mozart 'Requiem' in the near hidden score. In all, this is a moving film about truth and reconciliation that deserves the attention of us all, especially in this time of random acts of terrorism and their possible imprint on our minds and on society. Grady Harp, January 10
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139 of 154 people found the following review helpful By Dafydd Ieuens on October 13, 2009
Format: DVD
One of the best films I have seen on the struggle to reconcile with one's own self as well as one's enemy. There is no cheap forgiveness portrayed here. The acting by Neeson and Nebitt is unbelievably good and the directing is incredible. I couldn't believe that this was a made-for-tv film. Goes to show that on a shoe-string budget, BBC can produce stuff that is far superior to the drivel that comes out the mouth of Hollywood.
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125 of 146 people found the following review helpful By J. C Clark VINE VOICE on January 23, 2010
Format: DVD
A perfect movie is a rare thing. No committee can produce perfection; the too many cooks are never so present as during the production of a movie. I've seen a few, but not many. When 1 person does everything, there's one vision to be 1% short. But when tens or hundreds do it, then each contributes his individual failure until we're left wondering, as we do when watching some YouTube clip of kids riding their bikes off a roof, "Wow..what the **** were they thinking?" However, "Five Minutes of Heaven" comes darn close to perfection.

Two men collide, and then 33 years later collide again. Some serious sparks ensue. Who was right? Who lost the most? Who owes what to whom?

If you're reading these reviews, I'd advise you to stop now and get this film. This is fine film making with a pungent theme. Watch it for its powerful and beautiful tale of loss and recovery. Watch it for two great actors giving superlative performances. Watch it recreate a terrifying yet frightfully close world where hell was always around the corner and ever on the TV. And watch it for what it has to say about the problems, the not easily fixed challenges, we face in the world today....
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32 of 35 people found the following review helpful By Robert David STEELE Vivas HALL OF FAMETOP 1000 REVIEWER on April 26, 2010
Format: DVD
Do NOT give up on this movie in the first third. I stayed with it because a very experienced global law enforcement officer with anti-terrorism experience told me the movie was worth seeing through to the end, and he was absolutely right.

This is a fine depiction of how gangs and religious and political conflicts get started, it is a superb depiction of the "collateral damage" that affects "bystanders" to the end of their days, and it ends absolutely brilliantly with a typically strong but never-the-less very moving closure by BOTH of the main actors.

Highly recommended to those who wish to think about cause and effect and the psychological dimensions of intra-community violence.
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17 of 18 people found the following review helpful By C.Wallace VINE VOICE on August 9, 2010
Format: DVD
Northern Ireland was plagued for some thirty years with "The Troubles," sectarian violence between Protestant and Catholics before the "Good Friday Agreement" of 1998. Nearly four thousand people died. This film is about this conflict; the introduction states it's a "fiction inspired by two men who bear the legacy of one of these killings."

The key event is the murder of a young Catholic man by a member of the Ulster Volunteer Force, a Protestant, pro-British group. There was "nothing personal" about the murder; it was part of "The Troubles." The killer was only fifteen when he joined the UVF. Thirty-three years later a film production team sets up a meeting between the killer (who served twelve years in prison) and the victim's brother. The brother was about twelve when he witnessed the murder and narrowly escaped death himself.

To say much more would be to spoil this outstanding film. Liam Neeson is solid as the adult killer. James Nesbit is excellent as the jittery, weak-willed, revenge-hungry adult brother. Anamaria Marinca almost steals the show in a small role as a gofer for the film production team to whom the brother confides his true feelings.

I must say this film may not be for everyone. Sometimes the pacing is very slow. Viewers may have a hard time accepting that the killer is projected as a stronger character than the victim's brother. And the bit about the mother of the victim's reaction to the killing stretches credibility.
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