Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Five More Golden Rules: Knots, Codes, Chaos, and Other Great Theories of 20th-Century Mathematics Paperback – January 22, 2001

ISBN-13: 000-0471395285 ISBN-10: 0471395285 Edition: 1st

8 New from $19.63 22 Used from $0.78
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$19.63 $0.78

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Year
Best Books of 2014
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2014's Best Books of the Year in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Wiley; 1 edition (January 22, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0471395285
  • ISBN-13: 978-0471395287
  • Product Dimensions: 6.2 x 0.6 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,114,705 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Bring more joy to your favorite math-head with Five More Golden Rules from science writer and national treasure John L. Casti. Though a quick glance through the book will cause an intense fight-or-flight response in the numerophobic, Casti's writing is lovely and lucid as ever, explaining not just equations and theorems but their significance in our lives. Having discovered in Five Golden Rules that he couldn't restrict himself to just five important 20th-century mathematical theories, this follow-up explores the intricacies of knot theory, functional analysis, control theory, chaotic systems, and information theory. Each of the five lively chapters introduces its subject with a seemingly unrelated anecdote that is (of course) informed by the theory in question. Then it's headlong into the wonderful details of postulation and demonstration that make math so much fun. Unlike a textbook, Five More Golden Rules meanders and breaks away from its proofs to discover relations between the symbols and the real world, from the stock market to the coastline of Norway. Besides giving the reader a break, this makes the abstract, almost ethereal concepts concrete and provides a definite advantage to the interested student. Perhaps textbook publishers should take note of this technique; until they do, we'll have to curl up with Casti's Five More Golden Rules if we want to have fun with our higher math. --Rob Lightner --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

any reader with a nodding acquaintance with calculus should find the book interesting and informative& -- Mathematika

"...any reader with a nodding acquaintance with calculus should find the book interesting and informative..." (Mathematika)

More About the Author

One of the pioneers of complexity science and systems theory, John L. Casti, Ph.D., is Senior Research Scholar at the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis, where he heads an initiative on Extreme Events in Human Society. He worked for many years at the Sante Fe Institute and The RAND Corporation, as well as serving on the faculties of Princeton, the University of Arizona, and New York University. A former editor of the journal Complexity, Casti has published nearly 20 volumes of academic and popular science and received his Ph.D. in mathematics from the University of Southern California. He lives in Vienna, Austria.

Customer Reviews

3.1 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

26 of 26 people found the following review helpful By Michael R. Chernick on January 24, 2008
Format: Hardcover
In Five Golden Rules John Casti wrote a wonderful book about important theorems in mathematics that were discovered in the 20th Century. The style and description was such that a layperson could understand, enjoy and appreciate the results. All the theorems were discovered before 1950 and they all dealt with topics in applied mathematics and particularly game theory and operations research.
Perhaps he found the list of five golden rules too restrictive and thus comes the sequel "Five More Golden Rules". Again, it would be hard to argue the choices. Casti goes into the details of the theorems and the theory related to them much like he did in the first book. However, in this book, he has chosen topics from very abstract areas of mathematics. I have a masters degree in mathematics and a Ph.D. in statistics and yet I had no familiarity with knot theory. So I learned a lot from chapter 1 but found it to be difficult reading, more like a mathematics textbook than a popular book for the scientist and layman.

This feeling continued as I read the other four chapters even though I was treading on territory that was very familiar to me (e.g. the Kalman filter of control theory). It was reassuring to me to see that this impression was also shared by the three customers that had already written reviews on the book.

I recommend this book wholeheartedly for mathematicians and other with strong math training. The Hahn-Banach theorem was the most important theorem that I learned about when I took my functional analysis course at the University of Maryland some 26 years ago. But I have not had much use for it since and I completely forgot what it said.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
32 of 33 people found the following review helpful By Daniel Lalonde on December 2, 2000
Format: Hardcover
.
«The linear dynamical system (**) is completely reachable if and only if the block matrix C contains n linearly independant vectors, that is, rank C = N»
If you don't feel completely at ease with this sentence, do not read this book. Every page contains mathematical propositions of such level, and such level of mathematical fluency is required in order to fully appreciate the content of John Casti's book. The content is interesting but the reading is made rendered somewhat tedious by this high density of maths. I have a degree in engineering, and I often fast forwarded trough the equations in an effort to not lose sight of the big picture Casti want to show the reader.
At the end you will be smarter, but it will not have been a relaxed reading. If you are looking for food for toughts, I would recommand, among others, «Paradigms Lost : Tackling the Unanswered Mysteries of Modern Science», by the same author.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
19 of 21 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 19, 2000
Format: Hardcover
This book was a good look at some of the newer, yet important laws that govern physisc, and science altogether. I found it well-written, fascinating and a fun book to read. I would not recommend it to a person without a strong scientific background, as the author makes many assumptions about the readers knowledge.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By Mark Twian on July 25, 2010
Format: Paperback
As a popular science/maths work - horrible. In the middle of the chapter on the Kalman filter he starts talking about Lie algebras without actually explaining what they are, or their relevance. The whole topic is just dropped in from above and then disappears from the discussion more or less without further comment. I understand what they are, but if I were coming to this as a layperson I'd be completely in "WFT??" mode.

Further examples of this abound in this chapter - econometrics is chucked in for no particular reason and then just dropped and ignored. A good example of a child on a swing is not fully explained. What is the variable 'l'?. I would guess the hinge point where the child's hands are on the ropes of the swing but that is never articulated. Langragian dynamics appears but it's just chucked in as a couple of formula without any identification of what it is or how he's going to use it. Technical phrases like "equation of state" are just used without any explanation.

To top it all off the chapter starts by asserting that the Kalman filter is one of the most important results of the 20th C but doesn't actually bother to state what it is until the last page, and then does a bad job of it.

I'm not sure I'd even accept this as a series of lecture notes. (It certainly reads as though it was sourced from a set though - a bad set.)
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?