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Five Star Science Fiction/Fantasy - Deep Blue Hardcover – May 13, 2004


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Product Details

  • Series: Five Star Science Fiction/Fantasy
  • Hardcover: 325 pages
  • Publisher: Five Star Trade; 1 edition (May 13, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1594141428
  • ISBN-13: 978-1594141423
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 5.7 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,807,910 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

In this engrossing, poetic novel of spiritual evil and the possibility of salvation from Wilson (This Is My Blood), a burned-out musician, Brandt, is playing in an obscure band when he hears a homeless black man, Wally, play the purest blues on the harmonica he has ever heard, music that encapsulates all the pain of the world. Brandt begs Wally to teach him how to play the same way. He disregards Wally's warning that he would have to take the pain into himself, and then play to purge it lest it consume him. Brandt's performance that evening changes the lives of his fellow band members. Together they discover that they can play not to wake the dead but to settle restlessly roaming spirits. Opposing them is a sinister figure masquerading as a man of God, who wishes the pain to go on and on. As Brandt and the other band members slowly and convincingly come to realize that a larger world surrounds them, Wilson demonstrates that a horror novel doesn't need gallons of blood to succeed, that spiritual terror can be even more effective. FYI: Wilson is a past president of the Horror Writers Association and an ordained minister.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Review

"From a darkly humorous tale of the power of words (Death and the Librarian) to a never-before-published response to events of September 11 (Ilion), Friesner's 12 stories illustrate the author's acutely sensitive vision of wonder in the everyday world... Known primarily for his 'Star Wars' novels... Zahn's short stories also deliver strong plots and memorable characters... Zebrowski's many novels (e.g. Macrolife) mark him as a visionary as well as a master of hard sf. The ten short stories collected in In the Distance provide a benchmark of his creativity... the author expands his concept of the human condition to embrace the stars. Part of Five Star's continuing commitment to showcasing the short fiction of the genre's most prominent author's, these three volumes belong in most libraries where short sf is popular."
-- Library Journal (December 2002) (Library Journal 20021201)

"...Part of Five Star's continuing commitment to showcasing the short fiction of the genre's most prominent authors, these three volumes (Death and the Librarian and Other Stories/ Star Song and Other Stories/ In the Distance, and Ahead in Time) belong in most libraries where short sf is popular."
-- Library Journal (December 2002) (Library Journal 20021201)

"Four more titles in Five Star's new series (God Is an Iron and Other Stories/ Generation Gap and Other Stories/ The Lady Vanishes and Other Oddities of Nature/ Suppose They Gave a Peace and Other Stories) of short fiction by noteworthy sf authors offer a variety of tales that illustrate the depth and staying power of the genre...Most of the stories in these volumes have only appeared in periodicals. Libraries wishing to augment their sf or short fiction collections should consider any of them."
-- Library Journal (June 2002) (Library Journal 20020615)

"... [an] engrossing, poetic novel of spiritual evil and the possibility of salvation... Wilson demonstrates that a horror novel doesn't need gallons of blood to succeed, that spiritual terror can be even more effective."
--Publisher's Weekly (May 2004) (Publisher's Weekly 20040501)

"Deep Blue is a wonderful find and well worth exploring."
--Cemetery Dance Magazine, March 2005 (Cemetary Dance 20050301)

More About the Author

I was born in a very small town in Illinois. Clay County has less people in it than your average large city, and Flora , Illinois , is so tiny it barely hits the map. That's where it happened, though. My grandparents lived there, and I spent a lot of happy times with them in my youth -- particularly my grandfather, Merle Cornelius Smith, who was likely the most amazing man I'll ever claim association with. But that's another story, and this one is about me.

My first really clear memories start around my third year of life, when my father left. He took me out for a drive, let me sit on his lap, then went back out for milkshakes and never came back. Things blur quite a lot during that period, but after a period of living with my grandparents, my brother and I were whisked away to Charleston Illinois , where our mom had a job working in one of the cafeterias at Eastern Illinois University , and had married a barber named Robert Leland "Bob" Smith. I could write volumes about good ol' Bob, but I won't. If you really want to meet him, look between the lines of the bits and pieces of Deep Blue where Brandt talks about his father. Think Seagram's 7, Ballantine beer, cheap cigars, Hank Williams, Sr., and Archie Bunker and sort of squash it all together into a 6'4" 270 or so pound frame -- that was Bob. Formative? Yes. Important here? Nope.

I escaped Charleston , family, Bob, and a number of other things in 1977 when I left in June and joined the United States Navy. I headed for San Diego , where I went to boot camp, headed next to Groton CT for submarine school (which I dropped out of because my ears wouldn't equalize) and ended up in North Chicago attending Electronics Technician "A" school. I learned guitar, got engaged, unengaged, taught Bible School , got excommunicated, and moved on to San Diego, California once again as part of the crew of the USS Paul F. Foster.

My time in the US Navy would fill a dozen books. In fact, parts of it can be found in almost everything I've written. Many of my novels were typed on US Navy computers (later on my own, but still on board) and the first two issues of my magazine, THE TOME, were printed and published on board the USS Guadalcanal (thank you Uncle Sam for supporting the arts). I was stationed on a lot of ships, went on a lot of cruises, lived in Rota , Spain for three years, and wound up retired in Norfolk , Virginia . I've worked as a contractor with several companies, and am now the IT Manager and Facility Security Officer for a company in Elizabeth City, North Carolina.

We live in a nice, new house now where everything mostly works, but recently I lived in the historic William R. White house in a tiny place called Hertford , NC , where you buy your hardware from a man named Eerie Haste, and you can still get an ice-cream cone for fifty cents. I have a woman who loves and supports me, Patricia Lee Macomber, three great sons, two of which are serving now in the US Navy, and the third of which will be there in June. I have a lovely, talented daughter about to graduate college, and another - 9 years old and smarter than any nine year old ought to be who keeps me on my toes. She is also an author, both the girls are. You can buy Stephanie's "Tales of the Southern Hotel," a collection of girls about a young girl named Mary Lou who has visions of the past, and two children's books by Katie, our nine year old, Perilous Pink PcGee and Mars Need Pumpkins, available for Kindle.

I've sold a small pile of novels to date and published over 150 short stories, been in 32 or so anthologies, countless magazines, year's best collections, won awards -- notably The Bram Stoker Award for poetry, which I share with co-authors Mark McLaughlin and Rain Graves, and a second Stoker for my short story "The Gentle Brush of Wings," from my Stoker nominated collection Defining Moments. I've been President of the Horror Writer's Association, and I'm an active member of both SFWA and the newer International Thriller Writer's Association.

These days, along with writing, I'm CEO of Crossroad Press, an ever growing print, digital and audio publishing company. Now, enough about me...let me tell you a story...

DNW

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
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I found myself getting drawn into a very unique story, well told, and not so overly complicated as to become bloated.
Henry Prentiss
Until one night he hears a lone harmonica playing music so deep, so pure, so full of pain he wanders the empty streets driven by the desire to play it.
James Sneddon
David Wilson weaves a tapestry of music, suspense, and horror that grips the reader and pulls them along for a great ride.
Eric Marcum

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By J. L. Comeau VINE VOICE on October 7, 2005
Format: Paperback
I have long been a fan of Mr. Wilson's finely crafted works of fiction (This is my Blood, Dark Ages Clan Vampire novel Lasombra, and many more), and you will become a fan, too, when you read his latest, Deep Blue, a complex and lyrical blues riff about agony and spiritual redemption. When a soul-dead, burned-out blues guitarist/singer named Brandt encounters a homeless black man whose heart-wrenching harmonica music rises from the depths of true agony, he begs the old man to teach him how to play that way. The old man warns Brandt that it is the pain, not the technique, that produces the sound. Brandt insists upon taking the burden of the old man's pain into himself so that he can play the blues with the same aching quality, but soon discovers that his new gift is also a curse. Brandt's music becomes imbued with sad, otherworldly beauty, but he finds he must play and play and play, lest the burden of the pain he's invited into his soul overwhelm him. Brandt and his band embark upon a spiritual quest to keep the restless spirits that surround them at bay and to fight the demonic force that feeds and grows powerful upon the world's pain. This is an exquisite meditation upon the nature of pain and redemption written with a blues sensibility that rolls through the mind like bleak, resounding chords of dark music. The perfect novel for a hot, sultry night.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By James Sneddon on August 24, 2005
Format: Paperback
Brandt defines the down and out musician. When he's not soused in Jose Cuervo he plays rhythm guitar for an unremarkable band in a hole-in-the-wall bar. Until one night he hears a lone harmonica playing music so deep, so pure, so full of pain he wanders the empty streets driven by the desire to play it. One by one the music transforms the other members. They feel pain so sharp and piercing it could only be the pain of the entire world straining for release. The band sells all to follow Brandt and seek out that one song. The one song behind it all. The one perfect pattern that blends each piece in harmony.

Deep Blue is that song. It lives in the words, bleeds off the page, and seeps into your being. Mood, story, emotion bound together and layered on top of rich, rhythmical cadences that thrust the reader forward in wave after unrelenting wave.

Deep Blue left this reader with something to ponder. Deep Blue left this writer with something to aspire to. David Niall Wilson's Deep Blue is simply the best novel I've read this year.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By N. Kenyon on January 18, 2005
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Deep Blue is one of those exceptional works of horror fiction that is able transcend genre. Rarely bloody but often unsettling, Wilson's language is poetic, his imagery surreal, and the overall impression is that the reader has stepped into a world that is similar--but not exactly the same--as the one we live in.

One of the greatest strengths of the novel are Wilson's characters, each one unique, each with a secret that drives the plot home. Down and out guitarist Brandt is given center stage at the opening, but by the end of the book the drummer Dexter, with his ability to recognize patterns and shapes in the randomness of life, has become one of its most important players. Like the novelist himself pulling plot strings, Dexter is the one who pulls them together at the end, fitting the pieces into a whole that is much greater than the sum of its parts.

Beginning in a city full of restless ghosts, ending in a rural backwoods setting complete with an electrifying mountain legend called the Sineater, Wilson's Deep Blue is a masterful work of fiction, and one of the most unique and thought-provoking novels you will read this year.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Eric Marcum on January 9, 2005
Format: Hardcover
In my opinion David Niall Wilson shines brightest when writing about hidden folkways and arcane religious images. In Deep Blue, Wilson creates imagery that is both original, and at the same time reminiscent of Manly Wade Wellman. Deep Blue contains passages that will take you, the reader, out of yourself and into a world you will be glad to return from in one piece. David Wilson weaves a tapestry of music, suspense, and horror that grips the reader and pulls them along for a great ride. This has been my favorite David N. Wilson work yet. This book is a must read for Wilson's established fan base, and a great first time read for those unfamiliar with his work. Bravo ! Mr. Wilson, Bravo !
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Henry Prentiss on April 23, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I snagged this one because I read a few interesting comments by the author in the Kindle forums here at Amazon. I thought, this guy seems pretty sharp, and went looking for his novels. The first one (of many!) that I found was the one referenced in the forum, called "Deep Blue".

I'm not going to waste a lot of space here and try to generalize the plot of this novel -- others have done so already, and likely better than I could. What I will comment on instead will be content.

First, it's a nice _long_ read. For the price of three bucks, I was _treated_ to a week's worth of story, and I'm not a slow reader. The author has a very smooth and descriptive writing style, and I felt that although long, it was a "necessary" long read, as to shorten the story would have lessened to overall impact of the work on the whole, thus cheating the reader. I found myself getting drawn into a very unique story, well told, and not so overly complicated as to become bloated. The book spends almost the first half teasing us with interesting happenings that are not quite explained, and chapters dedicated to the individual characters so we get to know them well by the time things really start to pick up about mid-way through the book. Again, I liked the leisurly pace used to draw the reader into the first half, and after finishing, I realize it was worth it to get to know the characters which gave the story more impact later on.

This author really writes smoothly -- I don't know why I've never heard of his work before now, but I'm off to get a few more of his titles right now. Personally, I really like a good long read, especially when you can feel that the author himself is working hard to communicate to the reader, and not just looking to crank out crap to make a few bucks.

This one is interesting -- don't miss out on it. Just read the synopsis, and you'll be hooked just like I was.

--Henry
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