Buy Used
$7.98
Condition: :
Comment: . .. Slight wear on edges and covers; otherwise item is in very good condition.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Flash 99% Good: A Guide to Macromedia Flash Usability Paperback – March 15, 2002


See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$8.50 $0.98

Best Books of the Year
See the Best Books of 2014
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2014's Best Books of the Year in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Shop the new tech.book(store)
New! Introducing the tech.book(store), a hub for Software Developers and Architects, Networking Administrators, TPMs, and other technology professionals to find highly-rated and highly-relevant career resources. Shop books on programming and big data, or read this week's blog posts by authors and thought-leaders in the tech industry. > Shop now

Product Details

  • Series: One-Off
  • Paperback: 240 pages
  • Publisher: McGraw-Hill/OsborneMedia; 1st edition (March 15, 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0072222875
  • ISBN-13: 978-0072222876
  • Product Dimensions: 7.5 x 0.5 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #7,322,775 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

In an October 2000 article, "Flash 99% Bad," usability guru Jakob Nielsen wrote, "About 99% of the time, the presence of Flash on a website constitutes a usability disease." Flash 99% Good: A Guide to Macromedia Flash Usability is a new look at the good and the bad of Flash today. Authors Kevin Airgid and Stephanie Reindel, a developer/designer and information architect, respectively, counter that, with a knowledgeable implementation of Flash, "form and function can coexist." Let’s face it, there’s a lot of indulgent Flash out there, and whether you’re the client, the project manager, or a member of the creative team, you may want to read this before you start your next project.

The book is not really a how-to; it’s more like a critique (or harangue) accompanied by screenshots (in color), personal asides, and interviews (for example, Adries Odendaal of the entrancing Wireframe Studio and even Kevin Lynch, Chief Software Architect at Macromedia). Topics include knowing your audience, creating clear navigation (including a usable "back" button), providing workable content (for example, enabling a print feature, bookmarking, Flash forms), accessibility issues, and the future of Flash. And there’s a chapter-long case study of one of Airgid’s designs (iconideas.com), which makes interesting reading. Makeovers are always fun.

The book is stridently opinionated. For example, they write, "Designers naturally rank color, shapes, and typography above information flow, usability, and download time." (If you’re a designer you may "naturally" bristle at that remark!) Oddly, these reductive comments make the book more interesting, like a line drawn in the sand--you want to see how they prove themselves worthy of painting such blatant stereotypes.

And they manage that with lots of advice, some of which you’ll adopt in your own work, some of which you’ll scoff at, and some of which is already moot with Flash MX (for example, aspects of accessibility design). Flash 99% Good offers experience-backed insights, plenty of personal pet peeves, and expert interviews. You may not always agree with what they prescribe, but they’ll make you think twice before you whip up your next Flash brainchild. --Angelynn Grant

From Library Journal

Older patrons are attracted to audiovisual material on the web, but this video unfortunately misses the mark. It only covers usage of AOL which the narrator consistently conflates with the Internet. Shots of computer screens are blurry, nearly unreadable, and often cut off at the edges. Explanations are incomplete and, in some cases, incorrect (a modem, for example, is defined as "a piece of software"). Not recommended.
Copyright 2002 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 22, 2002
Format: Paperback
Both Kevin and Stephanie do a superb job illustrating the potential for some highly usable Flash websites. Their experienced viewpoints are fresh and innovative and the text never dulls. The honest opinions expressed in numerous interviews by well-renowned "Masters of Flash" make this book a unique addition to any library.
The authors are candid and never tread lightly around Flash usability issues that have for some time polarized the information architecture and design communities. The concepts are easy-to-grasp, but never condescending. In the tradition of David Siegel (Secrets of Successful Web Sites) and Jakob Nielsen (Designing Web Usability), this book is truly for everyone.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Steve Carlton on April 28, 2002
Format: Paperback
I've been waiting for a book that dealt with usability as it relates specifically to Flash for a long time now. I manage a web development team and am constantly having to address the issue of "should we or shouldn't we use Flash for this project...". While a good majority of this book simply confirms what I think I already knew, there are many parts of the book that bring up some really good usability-related points that I just hadn't thought of. I'll be using this book as a reference to refer back to when future issues arise on when and how to use Flash in our projects. Overall, I really enjoyed reading this book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 4, 2002
Format: Paperback
Flash 99% Good: A Guide to Macromedia Flash Usability is very helpful with navigation and design. The authors have made the book extremely readable...professional, but not so "techy" that a reader's interest is lost. Personal interviews target situations and thoughts that many have experienced. Summaries and fast facts at the end of the chapters provide valuable information in a clear, concise manner.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

More About the Author

I started developing interactive when Mosaic was the dominate browser. I began my career working for The University of Western Ontario developing generation one websites. I continued to grow my interactive experience working for companies developing Macromedia Director Projects for Kiosks, Interactive TV, CD-ROM and other old school technologies. I moved to the metro Detroit area and worked for large advertising agencies, interactive studios and dot-com companies. I launched my interactive studio eleven years ago. Over the years my studio has developed interactive and motion graphics for clients such as: Disney, Nike, ESPN, CBC, MTV and One.org. I have authored several web design books, and my work has been featured in: HOW Magazine, Adobe.com, G4 Tech TV, Communication Arts, FITC, and the Globe and Mail.