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Fleetwood Mac's Tusk (33 1/3) Paperback – December 16, 2010


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Fleetwood Mac's Tusk (33 1/3) + Talking Heads' Fear of Music (33 1/3) + The Beatles' Let It Be (33 1/3 series)
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Product Details

  • Series: 33 1/3 (Book 77)
  • Paperback: 144 pages
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury Academic; 1 edition (December 16, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0826429025
  • ISBN-13: 978-0826429025
  • Product Dimensions: 4.7 x 0.5 x 6.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 2.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #390,498 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

Review on Synconation.com March 1, 2011

"[The] journalistic revelations and general insight add yet more layers to the double album's controversial standing."
-The Austin Chronicle


[The] journalistic revelations and general insight add yet more layers to the double album's controversial standing. (Sanford Lakoff)

About the Author

Rob Trucks lives and obsesses in Long Island City, New York.

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Customer Reviews

Trucks's writing style is very self-conscious and annoying.
S. Altobello
This book barely touches Tusk and reads like an E.E. Cummings poem peppered with select Lindsey Buckingham quotes.
Brian King
I know that she was, but anyone reading this book who wasn't sure would be hard-pressed to figure it out.
Gian Saja

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

28 of 31 people found the following review helpful By Gian Saja on October 31, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Well, I never. Man, it's bad enough you felt like readers needed to hear about your personal life, how you lie in your apartment and hear your neighbors having sex, whatever. I started skimming that stuff early on. And it all would've been palatable if you somehow connected it to the matter at hand, i.e. the Tusk album, but these episodes were just space-filling and indulgent. Like you were somehow equating in importance the mundanity of your life to one of the most epic albums of the 70s. That randomosity isn't charming, it isn't cute, it isn't eyebrow-raising. Not unless you bring it full-circle and truly connect it back to the album. Which you didn't do.

Then when you do talk about the album, you treat it as Lindsey's solo work and completely ignore all the others' brilliance. Not a single mention of the heretofore unprecedented crispness of Mick Fleetwood's snare. Yeah, we get it, Tusk was made in Rumours' shadow, but where Lindsey just wants to bang a drum and yell, a regression of sorts, Stevie and Christine both show serious growth that is either written off or ignored. I don't care that Stevie Nicks is flaky while on tour with the current incarnation of the band; I care about her five pieces on Tusk. All different, all showing unique sides of herself that deserve treatment on par with those of Lindsey.

Was Christine McVie even IN the band when Tusk was recorded? I know that she was, but anyone reading this book who wasn't sure would be hard-pressed to figure it out. Seriously man, the only mention of her brilliant, brilliant piece "Brown Eyes" is as a footnote on some indie flash-in-the-pan's "least favorite song on Tusk" list? Really?

Disappointing. Not for fans of the BAND and ALL of their contributions to this amazing album.
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12 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Bobby Teenager on June 21, 2011
Format: Paperback
An album as rich and storied as Tusk is prime fodder for the 33 1/3 treatment, so it's a shame that Rob Trucks spends at least half of the book talking about himself, and not even in relation to Tusk. He even opens the book by warning that the reader won't like the book because he inserts himself into it. I would have no problem with the author as a character in the book if it helped bring some insight into his subject, (which is, presumably, the Fleetwood Mac album "Tusk"); instead, Trucks indulges every distraction and memory that runs into his brain, from his noisy upstairs neighbor to stories of awkward, adolescent sexuality.

The only noteworthy part of the book are a series of quotes from Lindsey Buckingham which, taken as a whole, would barely be long enough for a magazine cover story. Along the way, Trucks turns eight chapters (of seventeen) to musicians influenced by Tusk. Some artists are passionate and inspired while talking about the album, (two members of Wolf Parade), and some are much too ambivalent to be given so much space (Dave Portner of Animal Collective; a member of a Fleetwood Mac tribute band who doesn't particularly care for Tusk). There is barely a mention of the technical process behind the making of the album, no interviews with the engineers who worked on the album, and not one single interview with a member of Fleetwood Mac outside of Buckingham.

One of the best 33 1/3 books is a fictional novella by John Niven that covers The Band's "Music From Big Pink". Niven proves that there are compelling ways to creatively discuss an album without merely quoting from recording logs and discussing mic-placement techniques, so it's not Trucks non-traditional writing style that makes his series entry so frustrating - it's frustrating because it's a poor book.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By John Wraith on March 12, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Tusk seems like one of the most interesting LPs of the 1970s, but you'd never know it from reading this book. The author seems to take the approach that the reader already knows everything interesting about the record and therefore wants to read character sketches about his own teenage life in Alabama, spliced together with a bunch of contemporary musicians who seem to have very little kinship with Fleetwood Mac or Tusk. I love Wolf Parade and Animal Collective, for example, but why exactly do they each get their own chapter in a book about Tusk? The author never explains. It just seems like filler. And it's a giant amount of filler at that. The whole book, really. I'd assume if you were super into mainstream rock music in 1978, the story of Tusk is old hat. I doubt, however, that the prime demographic for 33 1/3 books is people in their 50s. So it would seem worthwhile to me for the author to explain what makes the record and its recording interesting. But that's just what the author decided not to do.
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful By F. L. Stamberg Jr. on May 16, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
While I appreciate the fact a book covering TUSK exists, it's too bad this writer wrote it.

The book's exclusive interviews with Lindsey Buckingham are the meat of the affair and are often quite insightful. The author's insistence on inserting himself into the tale is distracting ... his facts are often way off base and his writing style is bloated without adding any significant information to the proceedings. For instance, he sums up Fleetwood Mac's prior seven-year existence before Buckingham and Nicks joined the band in one paragraph, a paragraph rife with incorrect dates and incorrect data presented as "facts." The author also apparently believes if something can be stated in one sentence, why not make it a paragraph? There's a helluva lot of unnecessary throat-clearing going on in this book.

The good points in this book are the Buckingham interludes. It's too bad the author didn't also interview anyone else in the band.

Having said all that, the Buckingham material is good enough by itself to make the book worthwhile for Fleetwood Mac and TUSK afficionados.
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