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Fletch And The Man Who Paperback – January 1, 1983


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 250 pages
  • Publisher: Warner; First Edition edition (1983)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0446303038
  • ISBN-13: 978-0446303033
  • ASIN: B000LTPPF0
  • Product Dimensions: 6.8 x 4.2 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 6.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #8,165,359 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Brian D. Rubendall HALL OF FAME on August 8, 2000
Format: Paperback
In this installment, Fletch goes to work for an American Presidential candidate after a murder in his campaign hotel. Along the way we get a lot of unique Fletch insights into the political process. This book would have made a much better sequel for the original Fletch movie than the idiotic "Fletch Saved." Overall, an excellent entry in the Fletch saga.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By M. M. Buchecker on March 11, 2000
Format: Paperback
If you are a fan of the Fletch book series (not necessarily the movie versions), this is the best Fletch book in that series. In it, a number of characters that appear in other books are written where you finally get an idea of their backgrounds, relationship to Fletch and true character. The books "Son of Fletch" and "Fletch Reflected" are best understood by reading this book first. Apart from character histories, this book provides insight into the political process of the campaign/primary trail. As with some of the better Fletch books, the twist of the ending will have you immediately re-reading the book to look for the subtleties and nuances missed the first time around when you were simply enjoying the storyline. I highly recommend this book!
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Format: Paperback
If you've ever worked for a presidential campaign- particularly one in a Northeast state like New Hampshire- you'll feel the winter wind wipping at your back and the freezing snow on your feet when you read 'Fletch and the Man Who', a crisp, spot-on mystery that swirls around a presidential campaign.

Like watching 'The Royal Tenenbaums', 'Man Who' feels intentionally timeless to me- like the plot could've unfolded at any point from 1950 through the late 90's. Without relying on dated references or lame attempts at social criticism, Gregory McDonald instead places his brilliantly smarmy private eye, Fletch, in the limelight as he works to solve the murder of a girl whose body was discovered fallen out the window of the presidential candidate's hotel suite.

'The Man Who' whisks along and finishes with an exciting burst, but while the details are enjoyable, the supporting characters are uncharacteristically weak and the plot fairly straightforward, especially for McDonald.

If you're looking for a complex mystery, check out something else. But if you like your commentary subtle, your details rich, and your one-liners fast, check out 'The Man Who'. If you read it on a summer afteroon, you'll still feel the chill of the February wind.
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By RL on April 24, 2013
Format: Paperback
I admire Gregory Mcdonald for developing the screwball detective schtick long before it became a standard genre piece. The Fletch series was one of the first to easily and completely walk away from it's various stalwart predeccesors, from the uptight Victorian to the hardboiled detective. It's hard to break new ground, but he undeniably did it.
That said, it must be admitted that sometimes his work veers a little too quirky. It's often hard to get a grip on when Fletch is really befuddled, and when he's having a good time, and that lack of being able to fully understand the character makes it tough to care about him. The whole thing is very surface level, with almost no depth.
Not that you shouldn't give this a try. This is a good book, a fun book- it's just not one that is likely to stay on your mind a month after you've finished it.
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Format: Paperback
Like the overpraised but not terrible The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, this is a murder mystery second and a celebration of a newspaper man first. Fletch goes to work for a presidential campaign. The majority of the book talks about the scrutiny of the campaign trail, the little gestures that get blown out of proportion and the camraderie of the journalists. There are women dying throughout the book but they seem secondary to the main plot which consists of putting Fletch on the opposite side of investigative journalism as the guy who has to keep the floodgates closed.

The mystery feels like a cheat since Fletch doesn't work out the murderer's identity so much as stumble on it and there's a tired little bit at the end where Fletch tries to save someone from the murderer.
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