Buy Used
$3.31
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: ELIGIBLE FOR *FREE* SUPER SAVER SHIPPING, AMAZON CUSTOMER SERVICE WITH DELIVERY TRACKING. Book may have moderate wear to corners and edges. CD may or may not be included. Could be ex-library.
Access codes and supplements are not guaranteed with used items.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Flight of Eagles Mass Market Paperback – July 1, 1999

ISBN-13: 978-0425169681 ISBN-10: 0425169685

Used
Price: $3.31
12 New from $4.14 178 Used from $0.01 4 Collectible from $2.95
Amazon Price New from Used from
Mass Market Paperback
"Please retry"
$4.14 $0.01
Free Two-Day Shipping for College Students with Amazon Student Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Year
Best Books of 2014
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2014's Best Books of the Year in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.

Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 336 pages
  • Publisher: Berkley (July 1, 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0425169685
  • ISBN-13: 978-0425169681
  • Product Dimensions: 4.3 x 0.9 x 6.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (77 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,651,741 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

YA-An international thriller that will keep readers on the edge of their seats. The unusual beginning, the story of Tarquin, a stuffed bear that has acted as mascot in various aircraft since World War I, hooks readers and offers a smooth transition into the main plot. Identical twins Max and Harry were born in the U.S. to a German mother and an American father but were separated when the mother took Max, the future Baron von Halder, to Germany. As World War II explodes, he has become a feared pilot with the Luftwaffe, and Harry is a Yank ace in the RAF. Each is aware of the other and knows his position. Extraordinary circumstances propel both their lives and the lives of those they love on a perilous collision course. Intrigue and deceit abound in this easy-to-read, action-packed novel. Initially the plot seems obvious, but unexpected twists and turns will keep YAs' interest right up until the surprise ending.
Anita Short, W. T. Woodson High School, Fairfax, VA
Copyright 1998 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Kirkus Reviews

Another crowd-pleasing, if somewhat wooden, tale of steely heroism and stiff-upper-lip bravado from the prolific Higgins. Returning to the WWII settings that he knows so well, Higgins (The President's Daughter, 1997, etc.) puts a pair of identical twin flyboys, one American, one German, on opposite sides of the war. The story begins in 1997 in Cold Harbour, a lonely Cornish villageand once a secret spy basewhere the real Higgins and his real wife Denise find themselves after surviving a crash-landing in the English Channel. There, Zee Aeland, a crusty innkeeper, turns emotional when he glimpses Higgins's teddy bear Tarquin, which the author purchased in an antique shop. Aeland tells him that Tarquin's original owner was dashing Jack Kelso, a wealthy, thrill-seeking American vet who fought for the British before the US entered the war. Recovering from a crash- landing of his own in France, Kelso met and married his hospital nurse, the impoverished German baroness Elsa von Halder, who laterafter her husband insisted on returning to the Statesgave birth to twin sons Max and Harry. Because he was ten minutes older, Max also became the new Baron von Halder. Then, in 1930, Jack died, and took Max to his ancestral homeland, while Harry stayed in Boston with his rich grandfather, brooding, and finally taking Tarquin with him to fight for Finland against invading Russians. By page 60, Harry has joined the RAF (as a Finn!), and Max, a.k.a. ``The Black Baron,'' is clicking his boots among the Nazis. Using the two boys to show that ineffable daring, chivalric nonchalance, and the ability to execute a flawless Immelmann turn can transcend political borders and ideologies (both Max and Elsa rapidly develop sour opinions about Hitler). Women, spies, tyrants and combat buddies come and go, but teddy bears, brotherly love, and a tearjerker conclusion win out. An old-fashioned, sentimental ode to chivalric virtue and family values: Not as suspenseful as Higgins's best, but well grounded in historical detail, lightened by amusing encounters with Hitler, Himmler, and other factual fiends. (Book-of-the-Month Club main selection) -- Copyright ©1998, Kirkus Associates, LP. All rights reserved. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Jack Higgins is among the world's most popular authors. Since the publication of The Eagle Has Landed--one of the biggest-selling thrillers of all time--every novel he has written has become an international bestseller, including The White House Connection and Day of Reckoning. He has had simultaneous number-one bestsellers in hardcover and paperback, and has been published in thirty-eight languages worldwide. Many of his books have been made into successful movies, among them The Eagle Has Landed, To Catch A King, and The Valhalla Exchange. He lives with his wife on Jersey in the Channel Islands.

Customer Reviews

Interesting story, with many twists and turns to keep your attention.
Gary Schlinkert
This is a really good story that will keep you interested and wondering until the end.
Mary Davis
Big fan of Jack Higgins, was pleased to add this book to my collection.
Ellen M. Peacock

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By nick gatz on November 1, 2001
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I found the Flight of Eagles by Jack Higgins to be very interesting and intriguing. The book had a strong plot in which Higgins caught the reader's attention by pulling in historical figures with fictional ones leaving you with suspense and thoughts of always wanting to find out what happens next. The books main Characters Harry Kelso and Max Von Halder are described with such realistic traits, thoughts, and actions by Higgins you would believe that they were real fighter pilots. The characters are described with great detail but often it is hard to keep track of them all until the end when Higgins ties them all together. I found it very interesting as to how Higgins used the bear Tarquin as a symbol in the book to tell the story of two separated brothers brought together by war. The realistic details of war, the planes the brothers flew, and the whiskey they drank made it seem as though you could be sitting right there with them. The book is full of suspenseful action that leaves you with a feeling that you just can't stop reading because you are eager to find out what happens next. The books ending is surprising but well organized in bringing all the events to a whole.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 31, 1998
Format: Hardcover
I have read most of Jack Higgin's books and it is my opinion that this is one of his finest works. Harry and Max Kelso are twins with an English father and a German mother who is the heir to a German Baroness. This makes Max, the elder by 2 minutes, the Baron van Halder. After the twin's father dies, the Baroness takes Max with her to Germany. Each of the brothers has a knack for flying and when the war starts up the both join their respected sides.
This wonderfully portrayed novel tells te story of their exploits during the war and is capped off by a very surprising and great ending.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Krupasagar Sridharan on November 26, 1999
Format: Mass Market Paperback
The first thing I thought when I read this book was, is this for real? Though the basic pconcept of the story, the twins living apart and on opposite sides, is rather contrived, and reminiscent of movies with bad stories, somehow, the way it has been written makes you feel that maybe, maybe all this is a historical account. That is one thing Higgins can do like noone else. However, there is a line to be drawn. I felt that the "twist" in the absolute end, those who have read it know which twist I'm talking about, and those who haven't, I won't spoil it, but the twist is, I felt, unnecessary. The story ties up quite nicely without it, and I can't figure out the author's motivation for that little extra.
But all in all, this play is an A-Class read! Definitely worth reading. It brought back a lot of the flavour of the era which seems to be fast becoming a lost art. All I can say is that this book was engrossing enough to make me miss a couple of appointments, and in the end, that's all that matters!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By snowy on November 13, 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback
What I was expecting was how two twin brothers growing up in the very different cultures of their respective environments - one as the sole scion of a Bostonian wealthy in the 1930s US, another among the Prussian aristocrat élite in post WW1 Germany. Would they share the same ideals beneath the contrasting exterior ? Or would they turn into mortal enemies, each a product of his own background ? But instead, all I got was two people going through virtually identical processes, becoming flying aces and shooting down bandits like duck hunting season. Identical promotions every step of the way. They could have interchange their identities at any point as many times as they'd wish without making any difference to the tale. They fly because that's all they want to do, with scant regard for the cause they fought for. At least the Baroness, though not necessarily a very likable woman, knew what she stood for.
Speaking of promotions, in no other book have I seen officers like Munro and Carter being promoted every few chapters/pages. This just stretches the credibility of the book.
As usual, Himmler was up to his old tricks, manipulating everyone and using the same old tricks. Even the officers he entrusted the missions to appear to have the same old struggle between doing a job as a professional and becoming a mere lackey. Somehow, the Third Reich never seems to be short of undercover agents in London ready to work for them.
Higgins would do well to seek better reviews and revisions before getting his book published in the future.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Apirat Sugondhabhirom on June 4, 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I am Higgin's fan since the Eagle has landed, but I found this book a disappointment. A bit too melodramatic. Abit too easy to guess. I also wish Mr. Higgin would come up with something new and exciting: he can do that, he has done so to us readers before. How many letter signed by Hitler himself were there in that war? (The gimmick was exciting in the Eagle has landed, but to use this trick again in Night of the Fox and again in this book was a bit too much.) How many more islands in the Channel would Higgin propup again? The deception-upon-deception up to a point is boring. In The Eagle has landed German team impersonated as Polish soldiers, only to find out Mr. Churchill was also an imposter. In Night of the Fox somebody acted as Rommel and the hero impersonated as SS officer. In "Filght" - Impersonating again. Please ! Even the Name Kelso was recycled from Night of the Fox. I find this really too much.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?