Flight To Mars

Amazon Instant Video

(55) IMDb 5.2/10

Four men and a girl crash-land on the red planet Mars after suffering severe damage in a meteor storm enroute. Finding an advanced and seemingly benevolent civilization living in underground cities, help is given in the repair of the rocketship--however, a sinister plot is discovered that could mean the annihilation of Earth by an invading Martian army. Tense, terrifying action on a planet of forbidden dangers. Produced by Academy Award-winning producer Walter Mirisch in other-worldly hues of two-color Cinecolor, "Flight to Mars" is '50s nostalgia at its imaginative best and is a must for science fiction and adventure lovers.

Starring:
Marguerite Chapman, Cameron Mitchell
Runtime:
1 hour 11 minutes

Flight To Mars

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Product Details

Genres Science Fiction
Director Lesley Selander
Starring Marguerite Chapman, Cameron Mitchell
Supporting actors Arthur Franz, Virginia Huston, John Litel, Morris Ankrum, Richard Gaines, Lucille Barkley, Robert Barrat, Wilbur Back, William Bailey, Trevor Bardette, Stanley Blystone, David Bond, Raymond Bond, Tristram Coffin, Russ Conway, Edward Earle, William Forrest, Everett Glass
Studio Egami
Rental rights 7-day viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Other Formats

Customer Reviews

Most of the movie looks pretty good, but the defaults really make it a dissapointment.
David L Briggs
The movie is a wonderful diversion on a Saturday afternoon, and is probably not as well known as other Saturday sci-fiers.
Mark Savary
Next to Forbidden Planet and Destination Moon, this is my favorite of the 50's sci-fi genre!
Glen Martin

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

53 of 53 people found the following review helpful By Dr. Freeman on December 9, 2002
Format: DVD
This is a fun piece of cheese from the time when not a lot was known about space or space travel. Well acted, just plain enjoyable for those of us who love our 50's sci-fi. Now the down side. The source material for the transfer is pretty poor. Image usually does a great job on their DVD's and perhaps the print used was the best available, after all this movie is over 50 years old. No matter, a movie about a trip to Mars which is inhabited by beautiful women and coniving men cant be all bad. And watch out for those meteors.
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63 of 65 people found the following review helpful By Surfink on June 2, 2002
Format: DVD
Fans of cheesy 1950s space operas will no doubt be pleased that this is out on DVD, although unfortunately the quality of the source print leaves a bit to be desired. Flight to Mars was rushed out by Monogram to capitalize on the success of Destination Moon, and really has no grounding in serious science fiction. Not yet famous and powerful, producer Walter Mirisch (Magnificent Seven, In the Heat of the Night) was still making Bomba the Jungle Boy movies, scripter Arthur Strawn had penned Karloff's The Black Room and a handful of potboilers, while director Lesley Selander (Vampire's Ghost, Catman of Paris) and associate producer/editor Richard Heermance cranked out mostly lotsa cheap westerns before and after Flight to Mars, everyone's sole SF credit. Genre fans will appreciate the presence of Cameron Mitchell (Gorilla at Large, Nightmare in Wax) as glib "newspaperman" Steve Abbott, Arthur Franz (Invaders from Mars, Monster on the Campus, Atomic Submarine) as bland, pipe-smoking Dr. Barker, and John Litel (perhaps most recognizable as Henry Aldrich's perpetually exasperated father) as Dr. Lane. Ubiquitous genre icon Morris Ankrum gets probably his meatiest SF role as Martian leader Ikron (he looks quite ludicrous in his `Captain Marvel' costume and cape), while Virginia Huston and Marguerite Chapman fill out the parts of brainy lady scientist (pining for the oblivious Dr. Barker) and brainy Martian babe Alita, respectively.

Apparently they could only afford one set of space suits (for the Martians) so everyone just wears bomber jackets and aviator's caps on the takeoff and spaceflight. All the requisite elements of cheap 50s space epics are here: the threatening (animated) meteor shower; patronizing, sexist dialogue; technical inaccuracies (e.g.
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67 of 71 people found the following review helpful By Dr. Jeffrey S. Appel on December 11, 2003
Format: DVD
I collect 1950s era Sci-Fi and I have been replacing my VHS versions with DVDs. Unfortunately, I need to keep my VHS version for this movie because the print that Image Entertainment made this from was in such poor shape. The VHS version by UAV Entertainment (The Wade Williams Collection) is MUCH better. Hopefully, UAV will come out with a DVD version soon.
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20 of 22 people found the following review helpful By David L Briggs on August 3, 2003
Format: DVD
This is yet another great SciFi classic that I first saw as a kid way back in the mid 20th century. I've seen it since on TV and VHS and I was very excited when I heard it was to be realeased on DVD. That excitement was soon dampened when I viewed this DVD. The original image used for transfer is absolutely horrible. There is fading, graining, and many splices that make the film jump and in some spots causes choppy dialog - and those are the minor faults. Almost immediatly after the film begins there appears a very distracting brown smuge directly in the middle of the screen. A very anoying blemish that changes shape and contorts for nearly a third of the movie.
Unfortunately, this is the only DVD copy of this film available so I whole-heartedly recommend it as a buy for collectors. Most of the movie looks pretty good, but the defaults really make it a dissapointment. Too bad they couldn't find a better print to copy from. Guess I'll have to keep my VHS edition as a back-up.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Mark Savary on March 5, 2000
Format: VHS Tape
This is an entertaining picture, but certainly not the best. The poor budget is reflected in almost every aspect.
The first few scenes glow with colors only possible through Technicolor, but after that the picture looks pretty standard.
The story has a crew of an experimental rocket being sent on a journey to the Red Planet, but meteor damage causes malfunctions that lead to a crash landing on Mars.
The crash of the spaceship is pretty poorly done, and the Martain cityscape will be painful to watch unless you're a very young viewer (flat cardboard cut-out travel cars and elevators seen from the wrong angles!).
The acting? Well... depends. I liked the two older professors in the crew, and the Martian bad guy.
There are some interesting gender issues, most notibly the overwhelming desire of the female crewmember to see the Martian version of a kitchen. For brainy scientists, the two leading female cast members still seem easily sidetracked by such things.
I think the best part of the picture is the first half; the flight preparations, getting to know the crew, and the interesting dialogue about Man's place in the universe that is discussed during the flight.
The ship tangles with the Moon's gravity, and the obligatory glowing meteor fragments, before crashing on Mars.
Once the crew meets the Martains and enters the elevator to the underground Martian city, the picture goes downhill too. The ending seems tacked on, as if money ran out and they had to stop filming where they were.
Still, the picture has some very good moments, and is enjoyable 50's sci-fi. It is much better than another picture that uses special effects clips from this movie, the notoriously bad (but fun!)"Queen of Outer Space".
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