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Flowers in the Attic (Dollanganger, Book 1) Mass Market Paperback


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Frequently Bought Together

Flowers in the Attic (Dollanganger, Book 1) + Petals on the Wind (Dollanganger) + If There Be Thorns (Dollanganger)
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Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 416 pages
  • Publisher: Pocket Books (November 1, 1990)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0671729411
  • ISBN-13: 978-0671729417
  • Product Dimensions: 1.6 x 2.7 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (864 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,707 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"At age 13, I survived almost entirely on green apple Jolly Ranchers and Flowers in the Attic, and to this day I can't look at the book without my mouth watering. My much loved copy must have come from a supermarket (it was impossible to go to a supermarket in the '80s to, say, secretly stock up on green apple Jolly Ranchers, without a V.C. Andrews book lurking by checkout)... I loved that book.
 
The narrator, Cathy, who ages from 12 to 15 over the course of the story, is part princess (she is locked in a tower; she is beset by cruel foes; she has long, perfect hair until the grandmother tars it one night), and part witch (she's tantrum-prone, pessimistic, cynical). Basically, I adored her because she is like all girls around the age of 13: at turns sulky, giving, selfish, charming, nasty and heroic.
 
Flowers in the Attic is most famous for the fact that Cathy and her brother fall in love. It's a weird, strangely old-fashioned love story (and is Chris ever the stuff of teenage dreams: handsome, brilliant, extravagantly chivalrous), but it's not what hooked me. What kept me circling around to the beginning was that hyper-Gothic female evil. The emotionally cold, physically abusive grandmother. The cloying, manipulative, mind-warping mother. It felt so new and stunning to me — these witches who seemed quite real. I devoured the sequels less to learn about Cathy's tragic love story than to see what kind of woman Cathy became — princess, witch, a bit of both? — and what she'd do with all those awful urges she inherited." (Gillian Flynn, author of Gone Girl, as related on NPR's All Things Considered) --This text refers to an alternate Mass Market Paperback edition.

About the Author

One of the most popular authors of all time, V.C. Andrews has been a bestselling phenomenon since the publication of the spellbinding classic Flowers in the Attic. That blockbuster novel began the renowned Dollanganger family saga, which includes Petals on the Wind, If There Be Thorns, Seeds of Yesterday, and Garden of Shadows. Since then, readers have been captivated by more than seventy novels in nearly twenty bestselling series. V.C. Andrews’s novels have sold more than 106 million copies and have been translated into twenty-two foreign languages.

More About the Author

One of the most popular authors of all time, V.C. Andrews has been a bestselling phenomenon since the publication of her spellbinding classic Flowers in the Attic. That blockbuster novel began her renowned Dollanganger family saga, which includes Petals on the Wind, If There Be Thorns, Seeds of Yesterday, and Garden of Shadows. Since then, readers have been captivated by more than fifty novels in V.C. Andrews' bestselling series. The thrilling new series featuring the March family continues with Scattered Leaves, forthcoming from Pocket Books. V.C. Andrews' novels have sold more than one hundred million copies and have been translated into sixteen foreign languages.

Customer Reviews

That's why I'd recommend this book, Flowers in the Attic, or any of V.C. Andrews other books.
Antigone
At first I thought it was just another book to read, but believe me when I tell you this; this book is really good.
DVega
This is a great novel, well written, AMAZING plot and story line, and unbelievably interesting characters.
Wade Campbell

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

104 of 106 people found the following review helpful By dru187 on February 12, 2003
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Okay, I realize that this novel is nothing resembling great literature. But that just doesn't matter nor does it affect my pure enjoyment of this series, as it is a well-written, completely engrossing story.
Flowers in the Attic is a *fairy tale*. A dark, twisted fairy tale, but a fairy tale all the same. This means that the characters and situations within the story should NOT be expected to be realistic in any form. Anyone complaining about the lack of realism is not seeing it as it should be seen. It takes place in some strange, imagined land that almost mirrors our world but not quite. It starts out all shiny and happy, describing the perfect, blessed existence of this beautiful family, and then it descends into a nightmare. Many of the complaints about the shallow characters are accurate but in my opinion it fits with the theme. The characters here can be silly and melodramatic and stereotypical. Nobody in this book talks like a real person would. Some of the older male characters are never developed at all but just kept shadowy, sometimes sinister figures who want to prey on Cathy and other women. And Cathy...she is the ultimate fragile blond-haired fairy tale princess. Only the twisted, upside-down version. Others have pointed out that she is not a likeable character. This is true, especially if you have read the rest of the series. But I don't believe that she was meant to be likeable. The abuse she has suffered has made her too messed up to be likeable, and her increasingly selfish, cruel behavior makes it very hard to have any sypmathy for her. So how did the author manage to make me care so much about a character's story when I so dislike the character? It all lies in the telling of it, the subject matter, the horror that goes beyond evil villains and straight into the human psyche.
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192 of 236 people found the following review helpful By Lyric Saison on December 18, 2001
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This is not fine literature, nor will anyone ever mistake is as such. The plot is better than that of the average bodice-ripper, with some interesting twists and a hint of mystery. The characters are a little one-dimensional, but Andrews throws in just enough lust, smut and violence to keep it interesting.
If books were foods this book would be a big bag of potato chips. You really should eat better, but sometimes you just have to cut loose and indulge.
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49 of 60 people found the following review helpful By Emanuel BONNICI on September 18, 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I was introduced to this spellbinding saga when I hired the film Flowers in the Attic (about 5 years ago). When I learned that there existed a book about this story, I just went to look for it and bought it. It is a shockingly true book, a pure example of greed and selfishness. When I read it for the first time I could not stop thinking that I might turn out to be a bad parent since the mother in the story was so normal in the beginning but then she changed... But to understand the whole reason of such cruelty one has to read the whole series starting with Flowers in the Attic, then Petals on the Wind, If there be Thorns, Seeds of Yesterday and finally the prequel of all the series: Garden of Shadows (the start of all the deceit) When I read Garden of Shadows, dealing with the early misfortunate life of Olivia, I thought that after all she was not as bad as she turned out to be. Ill treatment from her husband and the death of her two sons made her search for something to console herself into, which unfortunately turned out to be hypocritical religious teachings by the horrible and perverse John Amos, a distant cousin of Olivia and butler of the Foxworths. Unfortunately, the creator of such vile actions (the grandfather) suffers the least whilst the mostly innocent (the children) suffer the most. After reading this book, whenever I happened to pass by a large mansion, I used to ask myself if there might be someone hidden in one of the rooms of the uppermost floor, waiting to come out... My only regret is that this story is based on a true story.
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By musiclover13 VINE VOICE on September 29, 2003
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I was first introduced to "Flowers in the Attic" through the 1987 film starring Kristy Swanson. Now, these many years later I have finally read the book. I started out of order, reading "Garden of Shadows" the last book in the series, but prequel to "Flowers in the Attic" first. I have to say that this book is very good! You will be glued to the book from start to finish.
The story revolves around the Dollanganger family. One evening Christopher Dollanganger dies in a car crash and his family, consisting of his wife and four children, must go back and live with their family in Foxworth Hall. Both Christopher and his wife, Corrine, grew up in this mansion. It is because of their incestuous marriage that they were both banished from their home and their family.
Wanting to recapture her father's adoration and love, Corrine comes home and hides her children, so that she may inherit his vast fortune. She asks her mother to watch over the children, who are confined to the North wing of the house. They are not allowed to leave this area and can only go up into the attic. Soon their mother pretty much abandons them and leaves them to rot in the attic while she lives her life without them. Their evil grandmother does everything in her power to make them feel as bad, horrible, and dirty as possible, wanting to punish them for what their parents had done nearly 20 years prior. Soon the children discover that they are slowly being poisoned and why they are trying to be killed.
This book is an excellent tale of deceit, love, hate, pain, and triumph. I would definitely recommend this book to anyone! You won't be disappointed!
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