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Flowers for the Judge: Albert Campion #7 Paperback – April 18, 2008


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Flowers for the Judge: Albert Campion #7 + Dancers in Mourning: Albert Campion #8 + Death of a Ghost: Albert Campion #6
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Product Details

  • Series: Albert Campion (Book 7)
  • Paperback: 293 pages
  • Publisher: Felony & Mayhem; First Edition edition (April 18, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1934609129
  • ISBN-13: 978-1934609125
  • Product Dimensions: 7.5 x 5.5 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (17 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #799,821 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Albert Campion is the most sprightly detective of them all, and along with sharp characterizations and vivid, witty dialog, he helps make Miss Allingham's mysteries the joy they are -- Chicago Tribune

"Albert Campion is the most sprightly detective of them all, and along with sharp characterizations and vivid, witty dialog, he helps make Miss Allingham's mysteries the joy they are" -- Chicago Tribune

"One of her best-vivid and witty" -- New York Times

About the Author

Margery Allingham was a prolific writer who sold her first story at age eight and published her first novel before turning 20. She went on to become one of the "Three Queens" of Britain's "Golden Age" of crime fiction (the other two being Agatha Christie and Dorothy L. Sayers), who are credited with bringing the genre to maturity in the 1920s - 1940s.

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Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
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Characters are more developed and accessible, as well.
Marc Ruby™
What follows is an intricate story with many strands both past and present and the tension gradually builds to a nail biting finish and an intriguing epilogue.
Damaskcat
This is a thoroughly enjoyable mystery, particularly for those who are fans of this series or of mysteries of this era.
Jeanne Tassotto

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

16 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Marc Ruby™ HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on April 14, 2001
Format: Paperback
With "Flowers for the Judge" Margery Allingham signals the change in her writing style which was first hinted at in "Police at the Funeral." Campion has matured a bit and changed from a hapless zany to someone just a bit more like a friend of the family. Still occasionally fatuous, but, more often, showing flashes of brilliance. In keeping with this, the stories themselves are shifting away from adventure tales and becoming more typical of detective stories. While Allingham is rarely very good at keeping secrets, there really are mysteries and inexplicable clues to puzzle out.
The mystery in "Flowers for the Judge," is who murdered Paul Brande in the cellar lock room of Barnabas Limited. Brande is one of the owners of this respectable publishing firm, along with his cousins John Widdowson and Michael Wedgewood. Paul, noted for running off without notice, and being a bit hare-brained to boot, leaves behind his wife Gina. He had proven himself somewhat lacking as a husband and Gina was in the process of trying to divorce him. To make this even more suspicious, her relationship with Michael, while not exactly improper, is a bit too close to be considered a simple friendship.
When the police discover that the murder weapon was Michael's car, which was used to pump carbon monoxide into the lock room, suspicions blossom. With Michael unable to produce an alibi, the result of the inquest is a forgone conclusion, and Michael is remanded over for trial. Gina and Ritchie Barnabas (another cousin) turn to Campion for help.
The case is complicated by other events and hints of scandal, yet provides Campion with only fragmentary evidence with which to track down the truth. Driven by the need to exonerate Michael rather than simple get him released, Campion's task seems impossible.
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Format: Paperback
Who murdered Paul Brande in the cellar lock room of Barnabas Limited, a highly respectable London publishing firm? One of the heirs is arrested, and Allingham's serial detective, Albert Campion is brought in to prove him innocent.

The mystery is interesting, but my favorite scenes in "Flowers for the Judge" involved the proceedings at the inquest and trial--the minutiae of the 1930s British legal system, including the eponymous flowers for the judge. Fans of John Mortimer's `Rumpole of the Bailey' books should give this novel a try.

Unfortunately, this book features one of Allingham's china-doll heroines, who does nothing more interesting than faint every now and then. She's pretty, and wears lovely clothes, but her cleaning lady is a much more interesting character. We always know what these heroines are wearing, but we hardly ever catch a glimpse of their thought processes. I'm sorry to say that they strike me as rather stupid.

"Flowers for the Judge" has a wonderful ending. Yes, the heroine gets her man, but that is only a minor, uninteresting detail compared to the 20-year-old family secret that Campion resolves in a most unexpected fashion.

Here is a complete list of the Campion novels that Allingham wrote ("Cargo of Eagles" was completed by her husband after her death in 1966). There are also short story collections and Campion novels that were written by her husband, Youngman Carter, which I didn't include in this list.

1. The Black Dudley Murder aka The Crime at Black Dudley (1929)
2. Mystery Mile (1930)
3. Look to the Lady aka The Gyrth Chalice Mystery (1931)
4. Police at the Funeral (1931)
5. Sweet Danger aka Kingdom of Death aka The Fear Sign (1933)
6. Death of a Ghost (1934)
7.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Atheen M. Wilson on November 4, 2010
Format: Paperback
I don't recall having read this one, though I know I've read most of the Allingham Albert Campion mysteries some 20 years ago. This one is rather convoluted, but it is definitely an exciting one. The story is actually double, one based on the disappearance of a member of a publishing family and one based on the murder of another of the same extended family. What I enjoyed most was that the two stories dovetail so neatly, making a nice clean end.

The mystery is filled with red herrings, all well placed to misdirect the reader, and contains moments of action which give the author the opportunity to use her wonderful narrative talent. Even the subsidiary characters are interesting and well constructed, capturing the attention of the reader and leaving a definite positive or negative sense about them; they are definitely more three dimensional than Christie characters. The environment is clearly described and the emotional tension of the events is well conveyed. I was especially intrigued by the details of the court room and of the trial procedure, which captures the sense of tradition and of legal evolution in Great Britian.

For those who've seen the BBC/PBS televised series based on the Allingham mysteries, Campion - The Complete First Season and Campion - The Complete Second Season, this one very closely follows the book, though there are some noticeable changes, especially at the end. I was amazed at how closely the actors chosen to play the various parts actually looked like the characters as they were described by the author.
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