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18 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very original, very accomplished work.
This has been out for about 10 years now and there is still nothing like it. While there are fragments of Cynic's sound appearing in the later works of Sean Malone and Sean Reinert (namely Gordian Knot and Aghora), Cynic remains a unique proclamation among progressive metal.
Although commonly associated with death metal, it sounds nothing like Morbid Angel or...
Published on March 22, 2003 by Lord Chimp

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars Good but not as Great as it could've been
It's got some good parts and some nice extras in this package but I honestly wasn't overly thrilled with it, the vocals are weird and just keep me from really getting into this. It's supposed to be one of the great metal albums and while it's not terrible I personally don't think it's that great. Instrumentally it's wonderful and a great listen but the computery sounding...
Published 13 months ago by bafranksbro


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18 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very original, very accomplished work., March 22, 2003
By 
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This review is from: Focus (Audio CD)
This has been out for about 10 years now and there is still nothing like it. While there are fragments of Cynic's sound appearing in the later works of Sean Malone and Sean Reinert (namely Gordian Knot and Aghora), Cynic remains a unique proclamation among progressive metal.
Although commonly associated with death metal, it sounds nothing like Morbid Angel or Cannibal Corpse. A comparison to Death would probably be closer to the mark, but even that is pretty dubious. The music of _Focus_ is fast and technical, intricately woven together, with complexity at times seeming like a jigsaw puzzle with no solution. The style is defined by an abundance of complex meters & polymeter, microtonality, interlacing non-synchronous parts between all instruments, textural arrangements, refined percussion that is equally understated and fierce, and ostinatos held by one instrument while others weave around it. There are various changes in tonal shades but they are extremely unpredictable and follow few traditional chord changes. The music sounds spontaneous and subtly energized, like the band is channeling it and recording the first take -- but with the complications in meter would make this impossible. There are some elements of world music, but they are very understated since they appear more in compositional concepts than actual exotic timbres in the songs.
Mid-ranged throat-gouging rasps are the dominant vocal feature, but there are also synth-processed vocals and female vocals which lend atmosphere at timely moments. The rasping vocals are not terribly harsh and I like them a lot -- instead of sounding intimidating and aggressive they sound like they are in the midst of some sort of transformation.
Lyrical concepts are far beyond traditional metal, tending to be spiritual and/or occult. From the opener, "Veil of Maya": "In Maya's grip illusion transforms verity, perceiving thus a delusive world of duality."
Best of all, Cynic's music has a sense of unusual beauty and intensity, not unlike the "Angelic Manifestation" painting which serves at the album cover art.
Gordian Knot and Aghora are strongly recommended for Cynic fans, and vice versa. Technical metal savants should devour this album.
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40 of 46 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Mind Blowing, Stunning, and Completely Original, EXCEPT..., January 1, 2005
This review is from: Focus (Audio CD)
REVIEW OF REMASTER: ...now it actually sounds GOOD! For an album that had SO much going on, it really sucked to have such a compressed sound with the instruments, vocals, and drums all meshed together. Now you can hear everything. Guitars are seperated left and right nicely. The vocals are front and center and the drums and bass are nice and tight behind everything. The keyboards are everywhere they need to be. Enveloping at times. It gives the album a 3D quality to it. This is the kind of album that deserves to be listened to in a big movie theater on an amazing cd player (maybe a $20,000 Linn Sondek CD12 Anyone?) and amazing speakers with HUGE 5.1 surround sound. But since you can't do that, a nice home setup still makes it sound infinitely better than the original. If there was ever any doubt in my mind what the best metal (not just death metal anymore) album of the 90's was, this remaster just cleared that doubt up.

As for the bonus tracks, i disagree with the first reviewer that said the remixes barely sound different. Maybe my ears are trained to hear differences in sound and tone better (from playing guitar all these years), but i can definitely hear a differece. The remixes have a MUCH more "in your face" quality to them. As a result, alot of the ethereal beauty is taken away. Guitarists, drummers, and the people who like the more headbanging /V\etal moments on the album will probably like these remixes better than the originals. It's too bad they didn't do Uroboric Forms in this manner, as i've always considered it the most metal song on the album.

The three new tracks, as the first reviewer mentioned, are not Cynic, and not metal at all. They're still really cool and if you ever thought Cynic's softer, jazzier, moodier moments would make really good songs on their own, you'll no doubt like these tracks.

Anyway, this remaster is DEFINITELY worth picking up for fans of the album, even if you already own the original. The improvement in sound quality is IMMENSE and the extra tracks are just icing on the already perfect cake.

=================================================================

REVIEW OF ALBUM: The 90's were certainly the apex for death metal. Between the years of 1990 and 1999 death metal evolved from an un-melodic, testosterone fueled, raw form of metal to a genre that matured and began incorporating prog rock, jazz, electronica, and even classical into the music.

Death kicked the door down with the release of "Human" in `91. At the time it was easily the most ambitious death metal album ever and helped pave the way for a new breed of death metal bands that were actually intelligent as well as incredibly brutal. `93 saw the release of Sepultura's masterpiece, "Chaos A.D." and Death's brilliant follow up to "Human", called "Individual Thought Patterns". In `94 Tiamat's "Wildhoney" broke new grounds in death metal by experimenting with psychedelic, ethereal, and even beautiful Pink Floyd-esque soundscapes and melodies that showed death metal didn't have to be ALL about pure aggression.

`95 was unquestionably the biggest year death metal had ever seen. Meshuggah's "Destroy Erase Improve" literally shattered the concept of what "progressive death metal" could be with its mathematical riffs, bass, drums and vocals. At The Gates "Slaughter of the Soul", Dark Tranquility's "The Gallery" and In Flames' "The Jester's Race" all broke new melodic ground, with each featuring a unique take on the genre and all being undisputed masterpieces.

But despite all of that, perhaps the pinnacle of the decade was Cynic's 1993 stunning tour de force "Focus". "Focus" was unlike anything that had come before or after it. With one album, Cynic created a sound and music that was so original and so staggeringly amazing that no death metal band has equaled it since.

"That's a pretty big claim" you say... well, yes it is, but it's all very true. Cynic threw in everything but the kitchen sink on "Focus", seamlessly melding progressive death metal, distorted jazz riffs, solos, and often drumming. Then came the biggest innovation: the interplay between the computerized voice that "sings" half the lyrics and the more traditional death metal growls.

But all of that wouldn't matter if the songs themselves weren't good. And the songs on "Focus" AREN'T good, they're amazing! It just takes one listen to "Veil of Maya" before you realize how truly talented & original these guys are. Through the entire album, there are NO weak spots whatsoever.

That being said, picking a favorite song or moment is almost an exercise in futility. "Veil of Maya" is perhaps the catchiest song on the album. "Celestial Voyage" is beautiful, heavy, and complex. "I'm But a Wave Too..." is perhaps MY personal favorite. It builds on ethereal, jazzy guitars (one clean, one distorted, and one using feedback like sounds to create texture) before exploding into a series of mind-blowing riffs. "Textures" is a great instrumental that never loses `focus' (hehe) and will keep your attention throughout. The closer, "How Could I", is perhaps the most varied song on the album, shifting effortlessly between styles to create a perfect portrait of the entire album.

It's such a shame this was the band's only album. I can only imagine where they could've taken this fascinating sound with future releases. I seriously can't recommend this album to metal fans enough. Also, if you're a fan of "Focus", check out all the other albums I've listed in the review, along with Opeth's entire catalog (they happen to be my favorite band of all time). A good start would be "My Arms, Your Hearse" or "Still Life". And I can't forget to mention Death's "The Sound of Perseverance".

May metal be as spectacular in the 21st century as it was in the last decade of the 20th.
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21 of 23 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Mind Blowing, Stunning, and Completely Original, May 17, 2004
This review is from: Focus (Audio CD)
*****
The 90's were certainly the apex for death metal. Between the years of 1990 and 1999 death metal evolved from an un-melodic, testosterone fueled, raw form of metal to a genre that matured and began incorporating prog rock, jazz, electronica, and even classical into the music.
Death kicked the door down with the release of "Human" in `91. At the time it was easily the most ambitious death metal album ever and helped pave the way for a new breed of death metal bands that were actually intelligent as well as incredibly brutal. `93 saw the release of Sepultura's masterpiece, "Chaos A.D." and Death's brilliant follow up to "Human", called "Individual Thought Patterns". In `94 Tiamat's "Wildhoney" broke new grounds in death metal by experimenting with psychedelic, ethereal, and even beautiful Pink Floyd-esque soundscapes and melodies that showed death metal didn't have to be ALL about pure aggression.
`95 was unquestionably the biggest year death metal had ever seen. Meshuggah's "Destroy Erase Improve" literally shattered the concept of what "progressive death metal" could be with its mathematical riffs, bass, drums and vocals. At The Gates "Slaughter of the Soul", Dark Tranquility's "The Gallery" and In Flames' "The Jester's Race" all broke new melodic ground, with each featuring a unique take on the genre and all being undisputed masterpieces.
But despite all of that, perhaps the pinnacle of the decade was Cynic's 1993 stunning tour de force "Focus". "Focus" was unlike anything that had come before or after it. With one album, Cynic created a sound and music that was so original and so staggeringly amazing that no death metal band has equaled it since.
"That's a pretty big claim" you say... well, yes it is, but it's all very true. Cynic threw in everything but the kitchen sink on "Focus", seamlessly melding progressive death metal, distorted jazz riffs, solos, and often drumming. Then came the biggest innovation: the interplay between the computerized voice that "sings" half the lyrics and the more traditional death metal growls.
But all of that wouldn't matter if the songs themselves weren't good. And the songs on "Focus" AREN'T good, they're amazing! It just takes one listen to "Veil of Maya" before you realize how truly talented & original these guys are. Through the entire album, there are NO weak spots whatsoever.
That being said, picking a favorite song or moment is almost an exercise in futility. "Veil of Maya" is perhaps the catchiest song on the album. "Celestial Voyage" is beautiful, heavy, and complex. "I'm But a Wave Too..." is perhaps MY personal favorite. It builds on ethereal, jazzy guitars (one clean, one distorted, and one using feedback like sounds to create texture) before exploding into a series of mind-blowing riffs. "Textures" is a great instrumental that never loses `focus' (hehe) and will keep your attention throughout. The closer, "How Could I", is perhaps the most varied song on the album, shifting effortlessly between styles to create a perfect portrait of the entire album.
It's such a shame this was the band's only album. I can only imagine where they could've taken this fascinating sound with future releases. I seriously can't recommend this album to metal fans enough. Also, if you're a fan of "Focus", check out all the other albums I've listed in the review, along with Opeth's entire catalog (they happen to be my favorite band of all time). A good start would be "My Arms, Your Hearse" or "Still Life". And I can't forget to mention Death's "The Sound of Perseverance".
May metal be as spectacular in the 21st century as it was in the last decade of the 20th.
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Groundbreaking music, Masterful musicians., March 8, 2003
This review is from: Focus (Audio CD)
If you listen to this album, and you are aware that it was released about a decade ago, your mind will go numb with disbelief. How can something so brilliant, so unique, so musically advanced, combining such disparate worlds as Death Metal and Jazz so flawlessly, come from mere humans? I still get goosebumps and chills, and my jaw still drops whenever I listen to this album. Taking elements from the Jazz fusion movement (Weather Report, Return to Forever,etc) and merging those with heavy guitars and gruff, Death Metal style vocals, throw in a bit of prog-rock a'la Yes, and the masterful sound of Cynic is born. Now, I have to point out the blatant inaccuracies of one reviewer by the name of madbutcher. First, Cynic has elements of Death Metal, especially the vocals. They have not claimed to be a DM band. Second, the fact that there are not many solos means nothing. Is it mandatory to have solos to be considered musically advanced or technical? No. The music Cynic puts forth on this album is VERY difficult to play - the technical execution is mesmerizing, solos or not. Intermediate musicianship? Ha! It is easy to run your mouth. Let's hear you play all the bass lines on this album. Yet, even if you could do that, you are merely reproducing a performance. What would really impress me is if you have music composed BY YOU that can rival Cynic's in originality and innovation, because even if you can play faster or more technically difficult stuff, that doesn't make you better. Victor Wooten can play a lot faster than Jaco Pastorius ever did, but is he better? No. The earth-shattering innovation of this band has yet to be rivaled by any. The musical/technical execution is matched by few in the field (Spiral Architect, Atheist, etc). And finally, Coroner is NOT a Death Metal band, for chrissakes. They are very good, but it is more like what I would call "Proggresive Thrash". And Coroner has a distinctive style, but they are not a groundbreaking band. Yet Cynic's music is a genre unto itself. Coroner sounds rather common when compared to Cynic, who sound like a new era in music being born. NO ONE sounded like them then, not even close. And no one has sounded like them since. This album remains an unsurpassed masterpiece. This album is PURE GENIUS. Period.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of the best CD in Metal-Prog-Fusion, that I ever heard!, April 13, 2001
By 
Fusion (V Region, CHILE) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Focus (Audio CD)
Creo que este SÍ es un CD que vale la pena tener. Cuando escuché esta banda (con este disco; Focus), allá por el 94', en realidad me encantó de inmediato!.Las críticas arriba de "MadButcher", (su nick ya lo dice todo), son del todo ABSURDAS, (..."un novato tocando el solo de TEXTURAS???"...creo que MadButcher no podría tocar un bajo, aunque tuviese 1 SOLA CUERDA!!), este tipo está completamente IMBÉCIL!!. Sean Malone es uno de los mejores bajistas del mundo en su Género, no hay dudas de ello, con influencias claras de la mano del GRAN Gary Willis!!! (Malone, además, es Master en teoría musical de la Univ de Oregon), chequeen sus trabajos con su proyecto Gordian Knot, la banda noruega de Metal-progresivo: Spiral Architect y otras colaboraciones. Sean Reinert...sin comentarios...uno de los mejores y más innovadores bateristas de este estilo..(desde que se hizo internacionalmente conocido cuando tocó en el HUMAN de DEATH..); pronto saldrá su proyecto con Masvidal: Aeon Spoke ([...] Los guitarristas de CYNIC?: bueno, Paul Masvidal y Jason Gobel...son igualmente innovadores, incluyendo Guitarras sintetizadas, (efectos como el Roland GK-1)y denotando (Masvidal)algunas influencias de la mano del gran Allan Holdsworth en algunas partes...Excelente!. Bueno, que más decir..el que aún no tiene este CD o no ha escuchado CYNIC, DEBE al menos chequearlo, puede ser que a más de alguno no le agraden partes de las voces (con claras líneas Death Metal, ejecutadas por Tony Teegarden, aunque también hay voces sintetizadas, hechas por Masvidal), pero la música es EXCELENTE!!...en fin... ¡¿Qué esperan para obtenerlo!!???
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Best technical / prog metal album EVER!, November 23, 2004
By 
J. Forst "fatesfan" (Farmington Hills, Michigan United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Focus (Audio CD)
What?? No one has reviewed this masterpiece yet?

For those who don't know, Cynic started out w/ two Demos before they released "Focus". The demos had none of the jazz fusion breakdowns that Focus had become famous for. Surprisingly only one track from those demos made it on to Focus. Hunt down the demo tracks because they are well worth hearing (there is a demo on one of the "At Death's Door" comp cd's).

This might be an album that takes a few listens to absorb all that is encompassing your ears. The drumming by Sean Reinhert is some of the best death metal drumming ever. His unique blend of death metal style and jazz fusion makes the drums certainly an instrument of their own in case anyone ever had doubts. Bassist Sean malone switches between bass and chapman stick. His talent is as equal to Reinerts in the fantastic ways they have paced their songs coming in at the right time but in a unique way. The two guitarists (Gobel & Masvidal) have the most memorable licks and chops out there. I can't remember the last time I was so enthralled with the guitar sound other then when I first heard Fates Warning.

the bonus tracks on here (other than the three remixes) are surprisgly taken from the post-Focus project "Portal" with a girl singer. The tracks are much more lighter and airy...I have NO idea why they didn't choose trax from their "Reflections of a Dying World" demo .....but who knows.

The latest I've heard from them now is a group called Aeon Spoke but sadly it is mainstream sounding compared to the almighty Cynic.

Anyone in to to the Florida death scene or a fan of Meshuggah, Candiria, Fates warning, Death, Spastic Ink, Mahavishnu Orchestra or any other great prog project should check this out ASAP.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant album made even better, March 2, 2005
By 
This review is from: Focus (Audio CD)
I honestly can't think of another instance where a band had released a genre-defining album and just faded away. Imagine if Queensryche had debuted with Operation: Mindcrime and then broke up. That's similar to what happened with Cynic. They released Focus in 1993, bringing a whole new dimension to both the death and progressive metal genres, and then drifted away.

It's hard to adequately describe this album. The band had amazing technical prowess, and they used it to create a death metal album that would make a Dream Theater fan's jaw drop. I'm not talking about Malmsteen-esque guitar heroics either. Cynic's style owed more to jazz fusion than shredding, and the result was this free-flowing, yet highly technical sonic platter. And while it was highly technical, it is still very enjoyable and easy to listen to. Sometimes a band will go all out on technical showmanship and forget to write songs (see Spiral Architect). Fortunately that is not the case here. Focus can be appreciated on many levels. Prog fans will marvel at the musicianship and death metal fans should appreciate the uniqueness Cynic brought to the genre, even if they weren't as aggressive as most death metal bands tended to be. After Focus was released, the band split up. Some of the members resurfaced in bands like OSI and Gordian Knot, but the now-legendary Cynic was never heard from again.

Focus is an absolutely essential album for anyone who is a fan of death and/or progressive metal. It's just a breathtaking listening experience, and when you hear it you can "see" the blueprint for just about every technical metal band that followed.

Edition Notes: In 2004, Roadrunner took a great album and made it even better. The re-released version of Focus features remastered sound, 3 remixed tracks, and 3 demo tracks from a Cynic offshoot called Portal. The remixes really don't add much, but the Portal demos are quite cool. Featuring female vocals, they have almost a Cynic-meets-The Gathering sound. I give it my highest possible recommendation.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Technical metal at its best, March 11, 2001
By 
This review is from: Focus (Audio CD)
Cynic, in my humble opinion, is one of the best bands ever. Many of the reviews I have read complain about the synth vocals. I, on the other hand, believe they add much to the overall quality of the cd. Incredible musicianship. Complex rhythms and layering give the disc a very ethereal quality. If you like death metal and heavy music, don't buy this cd. Cynic is much more about jazz and fusion influences than metal. However, if you like what Paul Masvidal himself describes as wacky solos, mind-numbing technical guitar work, and an impossible bass solo (Textures) this is the cd for you.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Focused, August 31, 2003
By 
Reverend_Maynard (Glasgow, United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Focus (Audio CD)
Cynic conform to absolutely no musical norm I have ever encountered. The best description I can give of this album is that it is incredibly technical, supremely multi-faceted music, with just enough of a catchy edge to ensure it isnt just completely inaccesible to non musicians. The main influences seem to be death metal and a sprinkling of jazz, although the band forge a jaw droppingly unique sound that really bears no comparison to anything else out there. Sean Malone is an absolute genius on the bass, the guitars are never short of stunning, switching between delcate interludes, full on metal attacks and compelling lead runs and fills. The album is remarkably concise, hence the title. Songs rarely run longer than five minutes, yet seem to pack in enough exerimentaion and virtuosity in each case to construct an entire album out of. The vocals are also intriguing: rasping growls are juxtaposed with and complemeted by synth processed vocals, which mainly give the song its catchy edge, and briefly female contributions, which add shade and harmony to the incomprehensible whole.
The songs all display a unique edge: 'Veil of Maya' throws a big vocal hook our way, yet practically melts my brain if I try to fathom quite what the guitars are up to. By the time we reach the solo Im usually thanking heaven this band exists. Closer 'How Could I?' jumps between gorgeous mellow interludes and bludgeoning verses, while 'Uroboric forms' rides in on a massive riff which never seems to let go. 'Textures' and 'Sentiment' asre my highlights: the former is a stunning instrumental with a jazz feel and killer bass solo, while the latter uses female vocals and reams of unearthly riffs to entice the listener.
Ths album is HIGHLY recommended to metal fand who appreciate the technical side of the genre: I urge you to investigate this band, as its is unlikely you will be dissapointed. Look at the consensus between reviewers on this page as to the albums quality.
Im off to check out Gordian Knot and Aghora. I hope you enjoy 'Focus'.
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Bwaaaaa?, November 4, 2003
By 
This review is from: Focus (Audio CD)
The above comment was my first reaction to hearing this oddity (and I thought there weren't many things anymore that can still do that). This is a work that's impossible to classify and at least difficult to describe. At first it sounds like just another virtuosic speed-metal album, leaving one to wonder what the fuss is about. Then the subtleties start coming out; inventive harmonic tricks, quiet subtlety seamlessly blended in among the thrashing, a group chemistry that goes beyond mere unison lines. That's when it kicks in that Cynic was no ordinary metal group. There's a lot to hear beneath the surface, and I've been continually discovering new layers to this music the further I go.

For starters, the basic description of Focus I see on this page is that it's a combination of jazz and death metal. That's partly true - it does have passages of hardcore fury that can twist sheet metal into a pretzel, expertly contrasted with fiery vocals and a softer dynamic that's no less accomplished - but that's hardly an accurate description of the whole Focus experience. There's something indefinable that goes beyond just the mix of ingredients and makes it a still-fresh and still-intriguing listen. It's a mere 36 minutes, but even that seems just as it should be; any shorter and it would seem incomplete, any longer and it would become overwhelming. There's a whole lot to digest as it is. The shifting time signatures and super-tight unison lines are as accomplished as Rush or Dream Theater. The haunting atmospherics fill the whole room in an ever-shifting cocoon of sound. Synths and electronic percussion are sprinkled around to add an occasional flavor (though never enough to get tired of if you don't like that kind of thing). Sean Reinert's drumming provides plenty of metallic pounding but remains firmly in the jazz camp throughout, and Sean Malone's bass/Stick work refuses to be defined under any labels at all.

The lyrics are delivered alternately in an irritating serpentine growl (the only aspect of the disc I don't love, and it'll be an obstacle to get past for anyone else who doesn't like death-growls) and in a robot-like processed voice that comes out sounding all metallic. The lyrics are much more picturesque and poetic than you'd expect from just about any metal band.. or at least they make for some fascinating reading in the liner notes, even if the printed words bear only a marginal resemblance to the grating gibberish that raspy voice vomits out. But it's the music that makes this such an intense listening experience. Look past the cheesy intro to "Veil of Maya" and you'll be taken on a trip from hardcore thrash ("I'm But a wave To...," "Uroboric Forms") to spooky ambience ("The Eagle Nature") to wonderfully tasty instrumental tones (the very aptly titled "Textures"). Amid the virtuosity and speed-whirling, it's the subtlety that largely sets Cynic apart from everyone else.

Pretty great cover art, too. If your taste in metal goes beyond the outright extreme, you should probably be happy with this. If not.. leave it and come back after a while. This definitely takes some getting used to, but the most satisfying music usually does.
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Focus
Focus by Cynic
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