Buy New
$19.13
Qty:1
  • List Price: $24.95
  • Save: $5.82 (23%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 2 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Trade in your item
Get a $4.29
Gift Card.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Folk Photography: The American Real-Photo Postcard, 1905–1930 Paperback – November 2, 2009


Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$19.13
$13.71 $14.36




Frequently Bought Together

Folk Photography: The American Real-Photo Postcard, 1905–1930 + Real Photo Postcard Guide: The People's Photography + Real Photo Postcards KwikGuide: A Guide to Identifying and Dating Real Photo Postcards of the 20th Century
Price for all three: $57.21

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 160 pages
  • Publisher: Yeti Publishing; 1st edition (November 2, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1891241559
  • ISBN-13: 978-1891241550
  • Product Dimensions: 0.6 x 8.5 x 7.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,088,257 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

<DIV>Luc Sante's books include Low Life: Lures and Snares of Old New York, Evidence, The Factory of Facts, and Kill All Your Darlings: Pieces 1990-2005. He is a frequent contributor to the New York Review of Books and has written about books, movies, art, photography, and music for many other periodicals. Sante has received a Whiting Writer's Award, a Guggenheim Fellowship, a Literature Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, and a Grammy (for album notes). He lives in Ulster County, New York, and teaches photography at Bard College.</DIV>

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Grady Harp HALL OF FAMETOP 100 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on September 19, 2010
Format: Paperback
Luc Sante in FOLK PHOTOGRAPHY: The American Real-Photo Postcard 1905-1930 brings to our attention, or rather reminds us - for how many of us have cloistered these old postcards handed down to us from our ancestors only to leave them tucked away in 'boxes to be discarded/kept' - of a pastime from the early part of the last century when photos of the family or of interesting moments recorded during vacations or simply from daily lives were taken to a shop where they could be made into postcards to mail for very little money to lucky recipients. This craze was world wide, but Sante has focused on American made postcards, and because of that he dredges up on the pages of this very well designed book some 100 photographs on postcards that survey the spectrum of topics that amateurs felt made interesting (and at times newsworthy) messages to family members dispersed across the country.

The variation in imagery is tremendous: a simple portrait of a plumber holding a toilet and tools, strange locations for animals as in pigs on a sidewalk, obviously staged scenes with cutout props as in 'Paper Moon', religious acts, fires and their management by the local firemen, still lifes of death (photographic reliquaries) such as images of the deceased laid to rest in coffins, etc. The emotions these images touch are the spectrum of human interest, from humor to devastation. But it seems that Luc Sante is less interested in the recalling of these times than he is in substantiating these postcards as an important hiatus in the history of photographic art that began with the invention of the camera, then passed to the accessibility of this recorder of human events to the common people, to becoming a means of studying the development of America's progress into and within the industrial age.
Read more ›
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By R. M. Peterson TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on September 5, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The real-photo postcard (RPPC) was a postcard, printed in the darkroom on postcard-sized stock, often in editions of a hundred or fewer, which could then be sent by mail at the cheap special rate for postcards. Many were shot and produced by amateurs or small-town photographers, and most were of local events, buildings, or people. The principal impulse behind them was a means for the average citizen to share with distant friends or relatives, by mail, matters of importance or interest in his or her life. The RPPC was a largely folk enterprise, whose boom years were from about 1905 to 1920. Initially, the RPPC clearly had meaning for the photographer, the sender, and the recipient, but as the years passed most became just so much cultural ephemera, on a par with newspaper clippings and the programs for local social or cultural events. Now, a century later, RPPCs are becoming increasingly prized as items of historical, or nostalgic, value.

FOLK PHOTOGRAPHY contains about 120 RPPCs from the collection of Luc Sante, who, somewhat surprisingly for a fellow from Wallonia (the predominantly French-speaking southern part of Belgium), has made a career of sorts in what might generally be called Americana, including the fringes of popular American photography. Sante began collecting RPPCs around 1980, and he chose these 120 from his collection of about 2500 cards as representative of the genre. There are RPPCs of natural disasters (principally floods and fires); small-town street-scenes; pageants and parades; river baptisms; automobile-, train-, and even plane-wrecks; and numerous portraits of everyday people.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Jim Linderman on November 16, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
By turns lovely, gorgeous, lurid, gruesome, luscious and great. Full of histories we did not know, could not imagine and will smile wide and genuine when we do. That Sante is willing to share is to our advantage. When was the last time a single stationary image made you ache? Every library of photography, every institution of learning and every person who fears not our past and those capable of feeling small delights in our present will love this book.

Jim Linderman
[...]
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By erin on July 9, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book has an unusual and interesting collection of photographs. I'm particularly interested in this period of history, and in photography, so this was an excellent purchase for me. I actually disagree with the comment complaining about the authors writing though, and wish Sante would have written a little more.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Search