Sort: Oldest first | Newest first
Showing 1-16 of 16 posts in this discussion
Initial post: Nov 22, 2005 11:56:13 AM PST
Westley says:
In her book, Julie Powell says that she's a "writer" now. Ok.

So what is her follow-up going to be? Is she going to cook every recipe from Emeril's "TV Dinners" cookbook? BAM!

How about if she eats a box of every flavor of Girl Scout Cookies? BLAM!

Or she could read the entire encyclopedia britannica. Oh, that's been done already.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 2, 2006 7:35:36 PM PST
She'll probably have a few hundred more screaming fits and pound down a lot more gimlets.

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 10, 2006 4:48:44 AM PST
K. Lukoski says:
Yes, she'll probably write about how cooking relates to evil Republicans eating pastry or something...

In reply to an earlier post on Jan 12, 2006 12:11:36 PM PST
Ali says:
After forgetting to bring this book home from work with me yesterday, two days into reading it, I gave myself permission not to finish it. What a self-absorbed ninny!

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 26, 2006 5:52:21 PM PDT
J says:
Yes! Silly me, I thought this book was about a cooking project not a grammar lesson in how to use expletives (noun, verb, adverb - all are good - no need to limit yourself!) or how to whine about something for 365 days. Was she really 29 when she wrote this? It seems like a public demonstration of how someone can stall developmentally at 21. Great concept - lousy book. Please, no more.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 22, 2006 1:47:45 PM PDT
J. Phillips says:
If you're all so angst-ridden over this book, why dignify it by commenting here? Don't attack me, but I liked it. Maybe because I'm a housewife who's delved into culinary adventures, tracking down obscure ingredients at the Chinese supermarket and Indian spice shop. Or maybe it's because I have a sense of humour and enjoy a good read. It's not a cookbook. Get over it.

In reply to an earlier post on Jul 23, 2006 10:46:36 AM PDT
J says:
1 - Why comment here? To warn others who don't drop f-bombs casually in conversation of the language assault they will face. To warn others expecting details of a cooking project that they will instead be dragged thru her complaints about moving apartments and about her job.
2 - I would have enjoyed smart and witty descriptions about tracking down obscure ingredients. Didn't see any. I did however see lots of "my life is f-ing miserable. I'm getting another drink."
3 - I have a sense of humor and enjoy a good read also - this wasn't funny or smartly written. I bet you, J. Phillips - with your own culinary adventures and sense of humor, could do a better job than Julie did. At least you can write six sentences without a single expletive.
4 - Never thought it was a cookbook. Thought it was supposed to be an interesting cooking project. It wasn't. There are a lot of people who get published that shouldn't. We as readers deserve better especially with such a clever concept.

In reply to an earlier post on Jun 18, 2007 7:35:44 PM PDT
SB says:
I'm also a housewife, about Julie's age, who loves experimenting with vintage cookbooks (and who has a husband who humors me!) hehehe - I thought it was a cute, fun book. It is what it is. And it's neat when someone can turn a hobby into a book. She is a good writer, and it's nice she can see the humor in her boring life and do something positive with it.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 6, 2009 9:32:41 AM PDT
Carol says:
I brought it back to the bookstore and told them exactly why I hated it. The lady was very appreciative of the review.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 6, 2009 9:37:12 AM PDT
Carol says:
We are just trying to warn people that it is a filthy book. If you don't like F-bombs, it is nice to know ahead of time that it is! I had heard that Julia Child didn't like her blog, but I thought it was because she was old-fashioned and from another era. I WISH I had come here before I bought it though. I would have learned that it isn't my type of book.

It is fine that you did like it too, but it is great to hear these reviews too. Some people don't care for this type of humor. Julia Child's comment: Jones says Child did not approve of Powell's cook-every-recipe-in-one-year project. The editor and author read Powell's blog together (Julie and Julia was published a year after Child's 2004 death). "Julia said, `I don't think she's a serious cook.' " Jones thinks there was a generational difference between Powell and Child. "Flinging around four-letter words when cooking isn't attractive, to me or Julia. She didn't want to endorse it. What came through on the blog was somebody who was doing it almost for the sake of a stunt. She would never really describe the end results, how delicious it was, and what she learned. Julia didn't like what she called `the flimsies.' She didn't suffer fools, if you know what I mean."

I think this says it all.

In reply to an earlier post on Aug 6, 2009 9:39:06 AM PDT
Carol says:
Amen. I totally agree with you here. I am SO SORRY I didn't read these reviews before I wasted my time and money. Good thing I got a refund. Now, I am just out the time I spent getting to page 95 before I had to get it out of my house.

A piece of pure filth, in my opinion.

I feel sorry for Julie Powell.

Posted on Aug 6, 2009 9:42:34 AM PDT
Carol says:
By the way, here is Julie Powell's next book: Cleaving: A Story of Marriage, Meat, and Obsession

Here is also a link to an interview about her book: http://www.bordersmedia.com/bookclub/powell

It is pretty interesting.

Posted on Sep 23, 2010 9:40:02 PM PDT
[Deleted by Amazon on Sep 24, 2010 8:06:44 AM PDT]

Posted on Aug 8, 2012 1:39:11 PM PDT
Lilja says:
Wow, people are really bothered by some expletives. Are all readers 90 yr old ladies?

In reply to an earlier post on Sep 5, 2012 4:53:27 PM PDT
Last edited by the author on Sep 5, 2012 4:54:41 PM PDT
Crystal says:
What's wow is that you seem to be surprised that there are people who have an issue with expletives and naively assume that only elderly ladies would really be bothered by some expletives

In reply to an earlier post on Oct 5, 2012 9:15:24 AM PDT
Totally agree with you! Yes, Julie may be self-absorbed, but all writers are to a certain degree. If they weren't, they would not be able to write anything. And the language does not bother me one bit. It's 2012 - people talk about sex and drop the F-bomb in movies and pay-TV every day. In real life, people curse their jobs (if they are lucky enough to have one) or curse even more if they're unemployed. So what's the big deal about the profanity in this book?
‹ Previous 1 Next ›
[Add comment]
Add your own message to the discussion
To insert a product link use the format: [[ASIN:ASIN product-title]] (What's this?)
Prompts for sign-in
 


 

This discussion

Participants:  12
Total posts:  16
Initial post:  Nov 22, 2005
Latest post:  Oct 5, 2012

New! Receive e-mail when new posts are made.
Tracked by 1 customer

Search Customer Discussions
This discussion is about
Julie and Julia: My Year of Cooking Dangerously
Julie and Julia: My Year of Cooking Dangerously by Julie Powell (Paperback - March 5, 2007)
2.8 out of 5 stars   (679)