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Food Hates You, Too and Other Poems Hardcover – February 24, 2009


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Product Details

  • Age Range: 3 - 7 years
  • Grade Level: Preschool - 2
  • Hardcover: 32 pages
  • Publisher: Hyperion Book CH (February 24, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1423113918
  • ISBN-13: 978-1423113911
  • Product Dimensions: 10.1 x 10.4 x 0.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,672,304 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Grade 2–5—This hilarious collection of poems about food stretches the imagination and vocabulary. Young picky eaters are confronted in the title poem with the possibility that "If cotton candy, apple pie,/And French fries looked at you/And said, 'Gross! Blecchh! Nope, I won't try./I'll never like it. Ew!'" kids would say, "'Hey! That's no fair!/Give me a chance!'" Varying in length and form (four lines to a sonnet to a two-page poem), the poetry is fresh, funny, and challenging, including words like "pernicious," "prehensile," "unminced," and "blanched." Full-color and sometimes delightfully bizarre mixed-media illustrations offer clever asides ("Nuts!" declares a nut, and "Pea brain" announces a pea), goofy perspectives (from inside a mouth, for example), and amusing visual scenarios. In "Mom," readers might laugh out loud at the re-created scene from Goodnight, Moon, this one featuring praying mantids: "I ate your father. Yes, it's true./That's what we praying mantids do./His last words to me were 'Adieu./If only I could eat you, too.'" This is a winner that kids will love.—Lee Bock, Glenbrook Elementary School, Pulaski, WI
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From Booklist

Some of the most memorable poems in Shel Silverstein’s Where the Sidewalk Ends (1974) centered upon food—who doesn’t remember Sarah Cynthia Sylvia Stout and her leaning tower of trash? Weinstock borrows the food theme as well as Silverstein’s tone and cooks up 19 poems about the stuff we shove into our mouths (the table of contents literally places the poem titles inside a stomach). The stanzas, which vary from short- to medium-length, are mischievous and clever (sweet-flavored meats is rhymed with meat-flavored sweets). The titular centerpiece poem imagines a world in which food hates us, too: “That Trudys gross out rainbow trout, / And Rachels skeeve out schmaltz? / That Tommys make pastramis pout, / And sardines cringe at Walts?” The art also follows the Silverstein mold, eschewing cute drawings in favor of grotesque, ghastly, or disconcerting representations of children and animals. There’s a prevailing sinister undercurrent (the poem “Mom” begins with the line “I ate your father”), but that will likely only add to its appeal. Grades 1-3. --Daniel Kraus

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Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5 stars
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Fun to read and reread!
Pie Queen
This is also a great gift, I have gifted it several times.
a.vana
The illustrations are very cute.
pxlchk1

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By E. R. Bird HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on June 8, 2009
Format: Hardcover
Children's librarians spend a lot of time discussing the book jackets of children's novels or non-fiction selections. Now consider how often you critique a picture book's cover. Once a week? Twice? Or are you like me and you hardly ever think to critique them at all? I confess that I take a lot of picture book jackets for granted. Every consumer, whether they mean to or not, judges books by their covers. It's the natural course of things. It's how the world works. So when I see a really good cover, I mean a really really good picture book cover, I should give fair credit where credit is due. And I consider Food Hates You, Too and Other Poems to be a wonderful example of a successful picture book jacket. There's something about the title combined with that big old tomato blowing you a raspberry (so to speak) that appeals to kids and adults alike. As collections of poetry go, Robert Weinstock has a fine and twisted sense of humor that may not be entirely consistent, but at least stands out in the field.

Nineteen poems. Nineteen straaaaaaange poems. In them, food gets its due. Whether it's the contemplation of the taste of space, the recommendation of one cat-related ice cream flavor over another, or an ode to toast long departed, Robert Weinstock has a strange but consistent feel for what works as a poem. Kids reading this book will find themselves locating limericks, sonnets, and other forms. You ain't never seen anything quite like it before.

Now in terms of the poems themselves, they're a bit touch and go. Some work better than others. I was quite fond of "Eleanor Isabel Abigail Rhoda" (any poem that rhymes "South Dakota" with "small iota" has my respect) and "Mom" (more about that one later). Sadly the titular poem "Food Hates You, Too" didn't quite gel for me.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By K. Magowan on May 26, 2009
Format: Hardcover
This book reminds me of why I loved Shel Silverstein books as a child-- it's special because it combines top-quality illustrations with beautiful, clever poems. The poems work for both adults and children: parents will get a kick out of the puns, but this is also our three year old's favorite book, and doesn't appear to go over her head. Poems vary from the silly (cats recommending hairball-and-licecream) to the macabre (two dead pieces of bread being lamented in the aptly named "Toast") to the poignant/ funny (my personal favorite, "Cheese Sonnet," features a cheese bewailing his smelliness) to the send-up ("Mom" has preying mantids replacing the bunnies from "Goodnight Moon") to the philosophical (the last poem, "Food for Thought"-- "You may not know your brain is eating/ Every word you've just been reading"-- has a truly stunning, frame-worthy illustration). This is a truly amazing book.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Pie Queen on March 15, 2010
Format: Hardcover
My son loved these poems, inspired him to write his own. Fun to read and reread! Look for Giant Meatball by same author.

AAA+++
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
"You may not know your brain is eating
Every word you've just been reading."

The word play, humor, and brilliant illustrations took my breath away. My three children, all under six, laughed and giggled their way through the book, with me and my husband reading alternate pages aloud.

"If everyone hates different food,
Then couldn't it be true
That creamed chipped beef dislikes Gertrude,
And liver gags on Lou?"

"There was a piece of bread named Ned,
Whose twin bread brother's name was Fred.
They idly lived within a loaf,
Until one day I ate them both."

These creative poems and gorgeous illustrations are just as entertaining for adults as for children. A beautiful book, cover to cover. A splendid gift for any family.
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Format: Hardcover
We *love* this book! It's the only my 7 year old daughter consistently asks to read to me (love that). She giggles the whole time and has even been inspired to try her own hand at writing poetry.

The illustrations are very cute. Sometimes the poems are a little dark, as in a story about 2 pieces of toast that are dead, but in a way that kids love. Spooky yet hilarious.

I'd consider this a great gift for someone else's child even after buying one for my own.
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