Food Inc. PG CC

Amazon Instant Video

(2,160) IMDb 7.9/10
Available in HDAvailable on Prime
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An unflattering look inside America's corporate controlled food industry.

Starring:
Eric Schlosser, Richard Lobb
Runtime:
1 hour 34 minutes

Available in HD on supported devices.

Food Inc.

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Food, Inc. [Blu-ray]

Price: $15.33

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Product Details

Genres Documentary
Director Robert Kenner
Starring Eric Schlosser, Richard Lobb
Supporting actors Vince Edwards, Carole Morison, Michael Pollan, Troy Roush, Larry Johnson, Allen Trenkle, Barbara Kowalcyk, Patricia Buck, Diana DeGette, Phil English, Eldon Roth, Maria Andrea Gonzalez, Rosa Soto, Joel Salatin, Eduardo Peña, Gary Hirshberg, Amanda Ellis-Thurber, Tony Airoso
Studio Magnolia
MPAA rating PG (Parental Guidance Suggested)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Rental rights 48 hour viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Customer Reviews

Everyone that wants to know what they are really eating needs to watch this.
J.P.
I Highly Recommend you, your family, friends and loved ones all watch this movie!
A.D.
Makes people aware of how industries are raising and processing the food we eat!
LT

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

568 of 597 people found the following review helpful By loce_the_wizard VINE VOICE on May 21, 2009
Format: DVD
"Food, Inc." does more than serve as an exposé on the United States food industry--it connects the dots between the nefarious, contemptuous business practices of multinational corporations and their best friends, the compromised government regulatory agencies such as the USDA, FDA, and EPA, who have in the past been led by folks well connected within the very industries they are supposed to regulate.

But let's hold on a minute. Filmmaker Robert Kenner's documentary could have been just a dour, paranoid investigative piece and still told the truth. Instead, Mr. Kenner has made a colorful, fast-paced, and well-documented account of the state of the food supply in our country; the unintended consequences of the efficiencies, short-cuts, and technological methods inherent in factory farming; the insidious insider relationship between the meat industry and the agencies that should be regulating it; and the health effects, including diabetes, of consuming processed foods and fast foods.

Naturally, the culprits behind the curtain (e.g., Smithfield, Monsanto, Perdue) would not appear on camera, not because they are cowards but precisely because they are so powerfully connected, and have legions of lawyers and enforcers (yes, like any bully, these outfits do use intimidation), and are moving to control free speech and criticism of their practices.

The counterbalance to the doom and gloom comes from interview with small farmers; with entrepreneurs in the organic food business; with the brave folks who have tried to make a stand against the food industry; and with those experts who are striving to be modern day Paul Reveres in the face of mass indifference.
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219 of 237 people found the following review helpful By Luc REYNAERT on May 2, 2009
Format: DVD
Robert Kenner's movie is a perfect illustration of F. William Engdahl's book `Seeds of Destruction', which explains how international agribusinesses are trying to monopolize vertically and horizontally (and profit from) food production on a world scale.

The world's food chain is built mainly on heavily subsidized and, therefore, cheap corn. In fact, all humans chew corn the whole day long from bread over meat (all animals are fed with corn) to deserts and drinks. Transnational corporations are even trying to learn fish to eat corn. Corn becomes nearly a food monoculture.
A particular transnational company even developed through genetic engineering highly efficient corn seed which it patented, thereby creating a nearly seed monopoly. Buyers cannot use the produce of the seeds as plant seed for future harvests. The company's own inspection force controls with hawk eyes that its clients buy new genetically modified seed every year. Some of the company's supporters and former directors occupy key positions in US governments and government administrations (FDA).

The movie shows the disastrous effects of intensive farming on animals, as well as the health and environmental risks of diminished standards at livestock farming and slaughtering houses.
Fortunately, some biological farmers show more respect for their animals and for their clients.

At the end of the movie, the makers give a perfect list of recommendations for those wishing to eat `healthy' food.

This movie is a must see for all those who want to understand the world we live in.
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208 of 227 people found the following review helpful By thornhillatthemovies.com VINE VOICE on June 17, 2009
Format: DVD
How many times do we have to see horror stories about how our food, the food we eat, the food that goes into our bodies is handled, before we stand up and do something about it? Apparently, many because we still haven't done anything.

"Food, Inc.", directed by Robert Kenner, and co-produced by Eric Schlosser (writer of "Fast Food Nation") and Michael Pollan (writer of "The Omnivore's Dilemma), takes an in depth view at a handful of various problems with the food industry in our country. Presented in "Chapters", Schlosser or Pollan introduce the various segments leading into a series of graphics, interviews, archival and hidden camera footage and more all of which illustrates the problems we are facing.

Did you know that Chickens have been engineered to grow faster and larger, in order to produce more breast meat? The companies who provide us with chicken realized a while back that we prefer white meat. When a customer prefers something, it is more efficient to grow what the customer wants. White meat is also more expensive, so it is a win-win situation for these companies to fulfill our needs and wants. But what about the dark meat? The result? Engineered chickens ready for slaughter faster and yielding more white meat. But it also results in chickens with no flavor that are grown in very inhumane conditions. Most never see sunlight and can't walk for very long because their internal organs can't keep up with the growth of their bodies.

For many years, corn farmers have lobbied lawmakers for protection and subsidies, and this has created an overwhelming abundance of corn. Because there is so much of the grain, scientists have worked out many ways to use the abundant staple, to prevent wasting it, and to maximize profits.
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