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Food in Jars: Preserving in Small Batches Year-Round Hardcover – May 22, 2012


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Food in Jars: Preserving in Small Batches Year-Round + Preserving by the Pint: Quick Seasonal Canning for Small Spaces from the author of Food in Jars + Canning for a New Generation: Bold, Fresh Flavors for the Modern Pantry
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 240 pages
  • Publisher: Running Press; 4/22/12 edition (May 22, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0762441437
  • ISBN-13: 978-0762441433
  • Product Dimensions: 1.2 x 6.8 x 8.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (236 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #23,523 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

Library Journal
“Everything about this book, from the attractive design chock-full of enticing pictures to the ingredients, demystifies the canning process and alleviates associated fears….VERDICT: This is an excellent introduction to preserving. The author keeps things simple by using accessible ingredients and small batches.”

Washington Post
“McClellan’s voice is friendly and reassuring; the batches are manageable. True to its name, this recipe collection covers territory beyond the ping of a sealed lid, such as salts, syrups, granolas, stocks and butters.”

Relish!
“When there’s too much of a good thing…that’s the time to can just a couple of jars of something wonderful with a recipe from Food in Jars.”  

Seattle Times
“I'm delighted that McClellan's Food in Jars blog is now a book… [it’s] not restricted to jams and pickles; it's also got everything from nut butters to salsas.”  

Sante
“A ‘must have’ for any amateur or professional chef serious about gardening, farm-to-table, organic, and going green.”

Bookslut
Food in Jars contains a terrific introductory section, complete with photos, that will get you set up correctly and safely with hot water bath canning, the most basic canning process. And since her focus is on putting up small batches, it's a good way to dip your toe in without having to worry about finding yourself overwhelmed by 100 pounds of tomatoes.”
 
Saveur
“We've long been fans of Marisa McClellan's blog Food in Jars, a two-time Best Food Blog Awards finalist dedicated to the joyful packing of anything and everything into lidded glass vessels: jams, pickles, salsas, chutneys, syrups. With her cookbook, the experience is even better: rich personal stories, useful tips for canning and storing, and smartly written, eminently approachable small-batch recipes leave us hard-pressed to find so much as a single fruit, vegetable, or herb that doesn't work beautifully in a jar.”

About the Author

Marisa McClellan is a former writer and editor for Slashfood, and has a master's degree in writing from St. Joseph's University. These days, she writes about canning, pickling, and preserving at Food in Jars (three times nominated by Saveur magazine for a Best Food Blog award). She lives in Philadelphia with her husband. Visit her at foodinjars.com

Customer Reviews

I definitely recommend this book for anyone interested in canning.
Betsy Lescosky
Her instructions in this book and on her blog are easy to follow and all recipes are "GREAT."
Melody L. Adelman
All in all a very good book and I look forward to trying many more recipes!
Mandy V.

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

68 of 70 people found the following review helpful By DP Cooke on May 12, 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Canning is something that's intimidated me. I knew I wanted to be able to preserve fruits and vegetables and save freezer space but it seemed so complicated and time consuming that I put off doing it. This book simplifies the process and explains the why's and hows and seems quite complete with ingredients and times.

I initially browsed the book then started to read it and it's like having an experienced friend guiding at the beginning. Followed by some intriguing recipes - I never thought of canning brussel sprouts.

I can truthfully say that I am enjoying this book as instructive and interesting.
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181 of 196 people found the following review helpful By Jennie on August 7, 2013
Format: Hardcover
I have recently become interested and canning and I took this book out of the library, along with the Ball Complete Book of Preserving and Put 'Em Up!. I liked the idea of the recipes being for small batches of of 3-4 pints, or 3-8 half pints, since my kitchen is small, and my pantry is non-existent. I started by reading through the information on the canning process from the Ball Book, before moving on to the tasty sounding recipes in this one. I skimmed the recipe titles and the chatty little paragraphs that introduced each one, and carefully marked recipes that I wanted to try. Once I had tried a few simple recipes in the Ball Book (considered such a classic and trusted source, full of time-tested information), I came back to this one and tried a few recipes. Specifically I did the Basic Tomato Salsa, Pickled Brussels Sprouts, Pickled Zucchini, Caramelized Red Onion Relish, and Cranberry Syrup. This is when I started to notice the exceptional number of typos, and instances of missing necessary information. In most recipes it seems that the author has cut and pasted text from previous recipes. (Understandable when it is the same phrase "Prepare a water bath...") In some instances, an ingredient is listed twice in a row. In others it does not list the amount of headspace needed, which is vitally important in successful canning. I can only assume that the writer and publisher were in such a rush to get the book out and capitalize on the author's successful blog, that no one stopped to edit the text, or more importantly to TEST the recipes.

I noticed that while I followed each and every recipe exactly as written on the page, weighing or measuring the ingredients carefully, I had wildly different results with the recipes.
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47 of 52 people found the following review helpful By Melody L. Adelman on May 21, 2012
Format: Hardcover
I have been following Marisa for quite awhile on her blog. Her instructions in this book and on her blog are easy to follow and all recipes are "GREAT." I have found since getting "Food in Jars," I do not need any other recipe book on preserving. What I really like about this book is that the recipes are just enough....for a nice bunch of jars and not an overwhelming amount. The book is clear and concise with a sturdy binding and wonderful pictures. I also like that fact that it is in pounds and ounces and also the metric system so it enables more than people in the U.S. to use it. Great job on your first book out Marisa!!
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64 of 74 people found the following review helpful By Whitney F. on May 21, 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
The flavors in this book are just wonderful. I made the rhubarb jam with strawberries and oranges a couple days ago, and it is hands-down the best jam I've ever tasted. The perfect balance of sweet, tart, and spice. So far this is the only recipe I have tried from the book, but I'm eager to try many others.

While I trust that the author knows a heck of a lot more about canning than I do, and I trust that she tested the recipes, and I trust that an unsafe book wouldn't have been published (well, maybe I'm naive on that one, but I'd like to think it's true)...maybe I'm just too new at canning to be relaxed about the process. I've only been canning for a year (the rhubarb jam was my tenth project), but I've read a lot of canning recipes and these are the first I've come across that don't ALWAYS use bottled lemon juice, that don't specify the headspace in EACH recipe, and that don't direct you to skim the foam from your jam before you fill the jars (I don't know what that last thing has to do with safety, but surely the other sources tell you to do it for a reason?). Also, this is the first time I've seen curd recipes that can be processed in a waterbath canner--I'm grateful for it, because I love curd and am eager to can it, but I can't help but be a little apprehensive about canning something that has eggs and butter in it. I also dislike that most of the recipes are written for pint jars...is it ok to can them in half-pint jars? Does that affect processing times? I mention this because the author discusses using different jar sizes, but only mentions how this affects the processing time if you can tomato sauce in quart jars instead of pints.
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49 of 56 people found the following review helpful By Greg McElhatton on July 5, 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I started canning a little over a year ago, and I've tried a number of resources since then. I've enjoyed the Food in Jars website over the past year, so this cookbook seemed like a natural fit.

On the whole I think that the tastes that Food in Jars creates are good, and for that I'll absolutely keep this book. But I've noticed that for some of these recipes, especially those in the jam/jelly section, that the quantities are never right. Some have made too much, but most of them don't come even close to making the amount mentioned on the recipe; usually only about 75% of the suggested yield. And while I'll admit that I'm a relatively new canner, this is not a problem I've had with recipes procured elsewhere (other cookbooks, Alton Brown's on Food Network, or family members).

Still, like I said, the tastes are fantastic. Just make sure that you've always prepared extra jars (just in case it makes way too much) and brace yourself for not getting as much as you'd expected, and you'll be good.
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Most Recent Customer Reviews


More About the Author

Marisa McClellan is a food writer, canning teacher, and dedicated farmers' market shopper who lives in Center City Philadelphia with her husband Scott McNulty. She's the author of the blog Food in Jars and spends most of her days cooking up jams, fruit butters and pickles in her 80 square foot kitchen. Food in Jars: Preserving in Small Batches All Year Long is her very first cookbook.
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