Qty:1
  • List Price: $24.95
  • Save: $6.67 (27%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 8 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Good | Details
Sold by apex_media
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Ships direct from Amazon! Qualifies for Prime Shipping and FREE standard shipping for orders over $25. Overnight and 2 day shipping available!
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Food Wine Rome (Terroir Guides) Paperback – April 7, 2009


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$18.28
$13.61 $6.98


Frequently Bought Together

Food Wine Rome (Terroir Guides) + Streetwise Rome Map - Laminated City Center Street Map of Rome, Italy - Folding pocket size travel map with metro map, subway
Price for both: $26.33

Buy the selected items together

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 384 pages
  • Publisher: Little Bookroom (April 7, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1892145715
  • ISBN-13: 978-1892145710
  • Product Dimensions: 8.4 x 4.4 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.5 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (21 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #273,459 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"...an invaluable key to the city's authentic quaffs and cuisines. Eschewing eateries that are likely to be visited by the typical bus-group turiste, Downie walks readers through bountiful food markets, into artisanal-food shops and to the front doors of Rome's temples of food and drink. The reviews in this highly informative restaurant guide, accompanied by Alison Harris's photographs, also celebrate the people, customs and tastes that tempt so many travelers to eat as discriminating Romans do." --Town & Country

"Italian food guru David Downie wrote the recently published Food Wine Rome. It's an insightful and lovingly written guide to my former home town one of Italy's great food capitals. He starts out with some important definitions of classic Roman treats like local bitter vegetables, goes into 33 ways to order some of the best coffee you will ever drink and highlights some of the region's top wine producers...The bulk of Downie's book focuses on restaurants, wine bars and food shops of this food-crazed town." --The Examiner (San Francisco)

"Getting to the heart of regional cuisine can be a tall order, but The Terroir Guides ably examine the interplay between markets, local food artisans, winemakers, and chefs on a town-by-town basis, taking the reader from field to plate and making a great companion for any food-obsessed tourist...packed with local history, food lore, and useful translations." --Sherman's Travel

"When I travel, food is naturally a primary focus, but most guidebooks provide minimal information in that realm. Thankfully, The Little Bookroom is publishing Terroir Guides, a series for the foodie traveler that focuses entirely on culinary delights. The third in the series, Food Wine Rome, just came out this month...Even though I’m not actively using the guide on the ground, it’s a fun, informative read that’s prompting me to plot out all the gastronomic destinations for my next visit." --Cravings

"I love The Terroir Guides. They give me everything I want. They're a tactile pleasure, compact, meaty. They're lovely to look at, elegantly laid out, mutedly and tastefully colored...positively overflowing with the Who, What, Where and How even an intrepidly independent traveler should know...The Little Bookroom has a knack for putting guidebooks into print that are as useful as they are beautiful." --Wine News

About the Author

David Downie is a native San Franciscan, but has called Paris home since 1986. His travel, food, and arts features have appeared in more than fifty magazines and newspapers worldwide. His recent nonfiction books include Food Wine The Italian Riviera & Genoa, Food Wine Burgundy, Enchanted Liguria, Paris, Paris: Journey into the City of Light, and the critically acclaimed Cooking the Roman Way. He is also the author of a classic thriller set in Paris titled Paris City of Night.

Alison Harris has worked throughout the world shooting photos for travel books, cookbooks, advertising campaigns, book covers, and magazine stories. Her latest books, Markets of Paris, The Ptisseries of Paris, Chic Shopping Paris, Food Wine The Italian Riviera & Genoa, and The Hidden Arcades of Paris (Spring 2009) are published by the Little Bookroom.

More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
5 star
16
4 star
4
3 star
1
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 21 customer reviews
If you're going yourself, get it immediately!
Rachel Clifton
It makes a great gift for anyone traveling to Rome, or for those who just want to know more about Roman food.
Elizabeth
This turned out to be the best coffee I have ever had.
Tick Pyne

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

18 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Elizabeth on April 7, 2009
Format: Paperback
As a Rome-based food and travel writer I am one of the harshest critics when it comes to guide books about Italy in general, and Rome in particular. So it is with great pleasure that I can heartily recommend Food Wine Rome to anyone looking for a guide book to great food in Rome. David Downie has managed to include the city's hidden secrets as well as reveal new details about it's much loved culinary history. This is the book to buy to discover out-of-the-way cookie factories, pasta stores and hole-in-the-wall trattorie. It makes a great gift for anyone traveling to Rome, or for those who just want to know more about Roman food.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Tick Pyne on June 27, 2009
Format: Paperback
I've already reviewed Food Wine Italian Riviera, which I adored. This is a continuation of that review, in a way, and also a way to gripe about something. Read on. The copy of Food Wine Rome I'm holding as I write this looks like a box of chocolates. It's beautifully designed. Generally I don't give a fig about the looks of a guidebook, but this one is so gorgeous that I would buy it to give as a gift instead of chocolates. I am freshly back from Rome (and the Italian Riviera), where I put this little number to the test. All I can say is, though I tried to find things to disagree about with the author, who seems to know an awful lot more than most guidebook authors, I couldn't. That made me mad. But then I kind of got to know him, as I tried some of the weird and wonderful foods he loves: stuffed squid with peas, spring lamb in a kind of piquant vinegar sauce (at this wonderful trattoria, Da Gino, near the Pantheon), or classic oxtail stew (at a throwback, family-run place called Perilli, near what used to be the slaughterhouse, but is now a yuppie neighborhood). I had had some pretty amazing ice cream in Chiavari (near Genoa), and then I went to Settimo Gelo in Rome, at Downie's instigation, and although this parlor is way way out there behind the Vatican, I experienced the best, the lightest, the most sublime ice cream period. Yes, I did try San Crispino, everyone knows San Crispino and it's still excellent. I was renting an apartment so I went out and, as Downie suggests, bought freshly roasted coffee from three little places (Tazza d'Oro, Sant Eusachio or something like that--impossible, and a mom-and-pop place way way out in the east called Giovanni De Santis or something). This turned out to be the best coffee I have ever had. Ever. And I am an addict.Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Jane on April 22, 2009
Format: Paperback
Anyone considering a trip to Rome must include Mr Downie's book on their list of things to buy before traveling. This will ensure good meals ( and good fun) while in Rome whether you decide to dine at one of the very, numerous authentic Roman trattorias listed in the book or to try one of the more modern establishments which are also listed. You will have lots of options to choose from and Mr Downie has done all of the legwork for you. This book is not just for travelers but is also a must for those who live in Rome. I have inhabited the city for over 20 years and I have thoroughly enjoyed reading about places I know, as well as, learning about some of Rome's treasures which I have yet to discover. You can learn where to have your morning coffee and learn 33 ways to order it! The book is very helpfully divided into different areas of Rome. Mr. Downie focuses on restaurants, shops, markets, bakeries, chocolate stores and much more which respect the wonderful Roman traditions which have been passed down through generations. His history is thorough and fun to read. You won't be disappointed with your purchase.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Yukari Sakamoto on July 12, 2009
Format: Paperback
I couldn't put this book down. Many things capture your attention including "33 Ways to Order Coffee", a tutorial on Lazio wines, and the detailed glossary. The whole city is covered so you could land in any part of the city and have Downie's well selected shops ready and waiting for you.

Even if you are not planning a trip to Rome, consider getting this book. It is packed with curious information for any foodie.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Candlewood Art on January 18, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This wining and dining (and a great deal more) guide to Rome came to me highly recommended by a friend, an old Rome hand who knows the city like the proverbial palm of his hand. The guide seems not to be corrupted by favoritism or "payola" but to be a book of serious appraisal by an American who's lived in Rome long enough and eaten out sufficiently ubiquitously to rank as an authority. Three of us have just returned from the city after a month there and we followed the author's advice for about six of his favorite eateries -- some I'd already known from years past and two altogether new to me. I know Rome from much exposure over the past 60 years-plus but hadn't been there for five years and so was curious. I can attest to the author's up-to-date exposure, his caution, frankness, and his evident expertise in matters culinary and oenophiliac.
If this is a book to be taken on a trip by plane, however, its format and weight(above all its weight) must be changed to be made available in an alternate version. Beautifully produced and bound, it simply weighs too much for a paperback intended as a handy pocketable vedemecum for present-day luggage restrictions and carrying about the city. To make it simple: print it on lighter "India" paper. That will affect the beauty of the glossy illustrations but it'll be worth it. I'd like to thank the author for his introduction to a trattoria I'd never entered before though it was forever on my way to the Piazza del Popolo. I have been made selfish enough not to want to divulge its name here other than to second the author's recommendation: (to paraphrase) if you can eat at only one trattoria during your visit to Rome, make it this one. That is very high praise indeed! We went there thrice; it was a revelation to this ancient sybarite.
One of my best Amazon purchases in many a moon.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search