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on October 15, 2014
interesting
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on December 17, 2008
Taleb tips us off to his game in the book. Hidden in the many pages of gibberish, he mentions how authors who have little to offer to the human knowledge base write books, and if they can get word of mouth to reach a tipping point, the book will makes lots of money. He also describes a computer program that can string words together and make it sound like intelligent points are being made while all along it is actually saying nothing. Taleb has pulled a great prank on the publishing industry and his readers. I had to buy the book for a class and Taleb took my money like so many others. He is laughing all the way to the bank.

Don't be fooled by intelligent sounding titles and self proclaimed intelligent writers. Don't waste time and money on this book, both are too scarce to squander.
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on October 17, 2008
Taleb has some good thoughts, and is occasionally witty and amusing. However he drones on and one about the same thing. Could be truncated, and then offer (more) thoughts on execution.
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on October 16, 2001
Insightful, educational, and sometimes even hilarious. Taleb has a rare ability to weave probability theory, ancient history and philosophy into entertaining and easy to read prose...Taleb has a style all his own... and now he has moved beyond
books for derivative geeks and written one for everyone...
buy this book.. read this book... you won't be disappointed
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on July 2, 2013
He's certainly self-absorbed, but his views on cognitive processes that fool us are interesting. His approach is more relevant to environments, like trading in financial instruments, where one is competing against other actors that are attempting to act rationally, but there are everyday lessons also. I bought the audio version for use in my car and I'm listening to it for the second time.
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on January 24, 2016
That should be the books title. While the material within is interesting and insightful, the author is long winded, and seems to think his points the better by making them as complex as possible. I am read, but have never heard petit minon.
I also believe that Steve Jobs was more vision than pure luck, but thus book would have us believe in random chance and luck than skill.
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on June 11, 2005
I went into this book with high expectations, especially based on the reviews the book has gotten and the high praise heaped upon it. I don't remember the last time I was so disappointed by a book.

The author provides surperficial, arrogant criticism of some people, notably traders and George Will, and paises people with superficial, poorly reasoned complements.

The book is arrogant and too long, by the 10th page you could put the book down and not miss anything the author has to say.
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on March 22, 2006
There is no common theme running through this book. The reader is just led along as Taleb spews forth incomplete philosophical blather, and comes across as someone who likes to hear himself speak. The reader endlessly wonders what the point is, especially after the first few chapters of the book where Taleb is constantly reminding you that he'll make his point in a later section. It becomes a lot to wade through; it could have been edited down considerably to get at his main points.

However, at least he attempted to tackle the idea of randomness, which is admirable. Still, I wouldn't recommend this book to anybody. It's just too directionless.
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on June 3, 2014
One of the most unorthodox books, which challenges the correctness of already established laws and forces US to think of the other side, which we generally tend to ignore. Loved it , although for non-economic readers, sometimes it can be little difficult to understand but most of the examples are taken from simple situations which are easy to understand.
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on September 27, 2009
Taleb changed the way I thought about skill and luck. The book was not made to prove things one way or the other but to get you to think. Don't take anyones supposed skill to your bank. You need to be aware of the risk of what you are purchasing. This book applies not only to investing but to life in general. The book is easy and fun to read.
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