Amazon.com: Customer Reviews: Football's West Coast Offense
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Customer Reviews

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on May 12, 1999
The book concentrated alot on patterns and what the quarterback's supposed to do. It didn't cover much on the most important part of the offense, the offensive line. It didn't touch on how to be a good blocker and on the importance of the O-line. I was disappointed to see that it didn't include running plays. The most dangerous teams that use the West Coast all have an effective running game. It didn't go into much depth at anything other than on the quarterback's techniques. It's a good book for QB's and receivers. It's not bad for runningbacks that only want to play catch. But it isn't good for linemen. The book just needed more substance.
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on August 17, 1997
Maybe I was spoiled by the thoroughness of Coverdale and Robinson's "The Bunch Attack", or maybe I felt I was rereading Edwards and Chow's "Winning Football with...." but I was a little disappointed with what could have been a fantastic treatise on perhaps the most talked about football philosophy of the last 10 years. There are some nice parts of the book, but if your looking for a revelation of the West Coast offense you'll be disappointed. There is nothing on the West Coast Run Game, too little on pass protection, and only basic smatterings of specifics on technique. Think of it as a nice book for beginers
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on June 4, 2003
Warning to HS coaches...
The West Coast Offense, like any other offense, requires a certain type of athlete at certain positions. Just as the wishbone quickly degenerates without a power fullback to draw 4 - 5 defenders at the point of attack (Bear Bryant's recommendation, not mine!), the WCO requires a QB who is accurate within a given range (in the HS environment, 30 - 50 yards accurately and consistently) and mobile, receivers who have the native speed to force DBs into a 10 - 15 yard cushion and are capable of executing the occasional deep route. You run the WCO at your own risk if you lack those athletes, with predictable results.
Defensive coaches run 6 - 7 man blitzes, DBs congregate in the short zones (since they conveniently aren't forced to worry about the bomb), and unless your QB is exceptionally mobile (think young Joe Montana, Peyton Manning, etc.), you can count on him taking a pounding w/multiple interceptions, rushed throws, and sacks. Furthermore, most HS QBs lack the experience and maturity to avoid locking onto primary targets, which means that if the DBs hang in the short zones, you'll increase the opportunity for blitzing lineman/linebackers to take out the QB w/delayed throws.
Offensive lineman generally have an easier time in the WCO, since they are not forced to try to move defensive lineman/linebackers through drive blocking, but instead become amateur sumo wrestlers (another warning: Pro and College lineman routinely get away with blatant holds that will result in penalties at the HS level, so if you are counting on using WCO blocking techniques like the pros, think again).
The primary attraction of the WCO at the HS level is that many districts are composed of teams running offenses from the 1970s (the wishbone being the main example), and you may find success simply because your opponents aren't preparing to defend against a WCO every week.
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on April 30, 2001
In terms of best book, this is not. But it is a must read. The small chapter on how his protection works is different from Ron Jenkins The multiple West Coast Offense.(Which is a better book). But this book will increase your knowledge about the west coast offense, you can implement the offense with this book, so it's not a bad book.
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on May 14, 2003
This book is a must read for anyone interested in learning about the West Coast offense. It goes over every essential part of this difficult-to-learn offense and gives helpful insight into the strategy. As a quarterback, it helped me a great deal in understanding the offense and my role in it. I highly recommend this book to anyone that is serious about football and learning this offense.
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on June 25, 2015
Good book on the West Coast Offense as done a few years ago. A similar system to the old BYU passing game. Excellent for the passing portion of the West Coast offense.
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on July 11, 1998
A nice overview of pro football's most popular offense. I would have liked to have seen more formation diagrams, motion charts and certainly diagrams of running plays.
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on November 13, 2011
This book breaks down what I call the offense of champions into easy to understand language. A great coaching tool for all who love the game.
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on November 18, 1997
This book proves what I've been saying for years. There is no such thing as the 'West Coast Offense'. There is nothing revolutionary, earth-shaking, or even new about throwing the football.
Personal bias aside, this is a good book detailing a relatively simple system for working the underneath coverages and spreading the football around. Much attention is paid to route running. This section is rather important because the routes make the patterns work and the patterns make the offense work. Any failure at the most basic level can cause a bust. This is why we coach football.
I do recommend this book for those looking to install a competent passing attack.
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on June 24, 2015
It was ok.
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