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Footprints of the Welsh Indians: Settlers in North America before 1492
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10 of 14 people found the following review helpful
on December 27, 2005
Dr. Traxel's work on the Welsh Indians of North America is a well researched study into what many historians refute as total myth. The author digs deep into anthropological, biological, archeological, historical and linguistic records to vindicate his investigations.
In the year 1170 Prince Madoc of Wales departed his homeland due to strife and political turmoil. The first of his three voyages sets down in Mexico, the second arrives at Mobile Bay, Alabama and the third expedition touches down at the mouth of the Mississippi River. From these geographical points the Welsh made their way inland over the centuries while fighting Indian enmities and depredations. Many were eventually killed and the few survivors managed to migrate across and up the Missouri River, therefore later to be contentiously known as the Mandan Indians.
The evidence Traxel puts forth is invigorating and with the exception of the first few chapters (which seem to tarry on), the book is a perceptive read of early human origins, behavioral practices and migratory patterns.
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9 of 13 people found the following review helpful
on September 10, 2005
The fascinating theories about the Welsh Prince Madoc, believed by some to have discovered America in 1170, come to life in "Footprints of the Welsh Indians: Settlers in North America before 1492," by William L. Traxel. Wading through a tremendous amount of information and centuries of speculation and hypothesis, Traxel presents a compelling argument for what he calls "people who have no other voice" (p. 205). These mysterious people, sometimes called the "Asguaw" and the "Tallega," according to Traxel's conclusions were probably connected to the Mandan tribes who were virtually wiped out by smallpox in 1837. Including maps, drawings, and photographs that supplement an engaging presentation of information, Traxel's book is of interest to anyone who would like to look beyond the historical door that remains closed on the so-called "Welsh Indians."
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3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on June 1, 2010
Traxle has done a great job of chronicling the historic references that lead to the Welsh arrival in the Americas and their colonization. Impressive reading not so much as grand literature but rather in its organization as a case reference work. It is well written in the manner in which he presents the mountain of support for the premise. That support coming from the references from the neighboring tribes, the Welsh themselves, early contact with the Mandan tribe and the physical evidence that yet remains. Perhaps a turning point observation to understanding our past.
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on February 11, 2012
I was so fascinated with this book that I read it in two days. Well researched. So much I did not know!
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on March 6, 2015
Lots of previously unknow facts that point to a forgotten history.
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on August 7, 2014
just like you were traveling with the Welsh immigrants
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