Industrial-Sized Deals TextBTS15 Shop Women's Handbags Learn more nav_sap_plcc_6M_fly_beacon Melanie Martinez $5 Off Fire TV Stick Subscribe & Save Shop Popular Services pivdl pivdl pivdl  Amazon Echo Starting at $99 Kindle Voyage Shop Back to School with Amazon Back to School with Amazon Outdoor Recreation Baby Sale

Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

134 of 137 people found the following review helpful
on April 11, 1999
This book set the vision in my mind for the type of education I'd like to provide for my children -- warm, intelligent, full of life. A living education full of living books, living ideas, living people! For the past eight years, I've tried to re-read this book at least once a year to keep my vision fresh and my mind focused. This is the one book I always recommend -- or give as a gift -- to anyone as they first consider the idea home education. A real treasure!
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
78 of 79 people found the following review helpful
on July 23, 2006
This book was worth my time this Sunday morning to sit here and write a review on it. I have my dog-eared copy on my bedside bookshelf, where only the most loved or currently read books may reside. This book falls into both categories.

Last night I picked up the book to read a snippet before falling asleep. I just let the book open where it may and it opened right where I needed it -- on a page that explains how a mother might discipline her unmotivated (lazy?) child without demeaning him. She should encourage him, saying, "I know you can do this. You did ___." (and there she gives an example of a time when he did something to completion).

As another reviewer mentioned, this book is not a book for only homeschoolers. It is written for teachers and for parents.

Some quotes that I underlined in my copy:

"Excellence is a habit." pg. 37

"The adult, whether teacher or parent, has to be able to enjoy and understand what he or she is reading with the children." pg. 39

"In the Bible, the result of wrongdoing was usually related to the offense." pg. 45

"If you expect what is good, and are not shocked by the reality of the faltering footsteps toward it, you will be well on the way to leading." pg. 51

"Children obey best when their lives are as fully satisfying as possible. If minds are interested, skills are being learned, loving relationships are enjoyed, creativity is encouraged, beauty in art, nature, and music are appreciated, hours are spent in free play - why these children will be well on their way to having their sinful natures put in the back seat!" pg. 55

(she goes on to say why -- it's because "sinful natures expand like a malignancy with boredom, loneliness, passivity, tiredness, etc.")

"Our first concern is to open the door to the knowledge of God." pg. 92
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
103 of 109 people found the following review helpful
on January 16, 1999
I began homeschooling our children in 1985 using a workbook program. I read a review of this book in Mary Pride's Big Book, and borrowed it through InterLibrary Loan. Now I have my own copy! This book is a short introduction to home education philosophy as well as practice. Charlotte Mason included in the Preface of each of her 6 volume set called "Home Education", 18 Principles as a synopsis. If you are following these 18, you may be said to be a Charlotte Mason person. All 18 are explained in this book, in a short and easy to read format. I recommend this book to anyone considering homeschooling, or who is tired of the way they are learning and living now. CM is a Christian literature-based educational philosophy. It is a Discipline, an Atmosphere, a Life - and this book can show you how to get there.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
111 of 122 people found the following review helpful
on July 9, 1999
Mrs. MacAulay interprets the principles of Charlotte Mason, an English school teacher with ideas similar to Maria Montessori (but grounded in Scripture). Miss Mason lived from 1842-1923 and her writing is a bit flowery for today's readers. This book gets to the essentials of her philosophy outlined in this mottto "I am, I can, I ought, I will". What that means is basically that teachers need to help children understand their deep value to God, expose them to many activities so they can discover their gifts, teach the unchanging morals of Scripture and guide children in making moral choices for themselves.
11 commentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
40 of 41 people found the following review helpful
on February 6, 1999
As a parent considering homeschooling, I thoroughly enjoyed this book. It presents an appealing overview of what homeschooling and family life can be at its best. It takes the ideas and methods of Charlotte Mason and shows how they can be incorporated into any family, whether homeschooling or not. The information on "living" books makes the book a must read for any parent.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
41 of 43 people found the following review helpful
on April 12, 2005
This book totally shaped the way I raised my children. I read it when my children were small - they are now 22, 20, and 14. I have to say that it was the most influential book I ever read on raising a family. I see the beautiful fruits of the wisdom in this book, now that they are grown. I'm ordering another copy now for my niece. She is thoroughly Christian, but in a freeing not restricting kind of way. I put that sketch book in their hands, read to them "real books," exposed them to nature and GOOD MUSIC, taught them about God but "not too much" to turn them off (such a danger with very parents who are committed to raising a Christian family). Susan, I wish I could thank you in person or that you read my review sometimes. THANK YOU. PS Read her parents and brother's books, too!! (Francis Schaeffer (for apologetics), Edith Schaeffer (her books, too, were pivotal for me) for creating the right kind of home), and her brother Frank Schaeffer (and his religious journey). He changed my life in other ways, more profoundly than I can say in this public forum. Its an incredible family - read all you can get your hands on.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
19 of 19 people found the following review helpful
on June 16, 1998
This book is great for all parents/teachers to read. The things learned(or just reinforing what we have always known) can be applied in our everyday lives with our children. It helped to remind me of what childhood is for. A chance for our children to learn about the world they live in at their own pace. Through their own thoughts, feelings and desires, learning what is right for them as individuals. Yet not giving us the right to neglet some basic requirements they will need to get through life as adults. We can teach our children the Three R's and still have them enjoy learning. Education is a life long process to be enjoyed, anticipated and used to our benifit. Here is my favorite thought from this book "...an education which shall qualify their children for life rather than for earning a living." What a great idea! Children ready for life. A desire we all have for our children and a way to accomplish that goal is written out for us in this book.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
14 of 14 people found the following review helpful
on November 5, 2006
I liked this book and would recommend it to others thinking of home schooling. I would not consider it "light" reading. It is thought provoking and took me sometime to complete even though it is not a long book. Read the book with open eyes and an open heart regarding the education of your children.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
on November 28, 2009
I really enjoyed this book. It is sort of a compilation of advice Mrs Macaulay has learned through the teachings she has read of Charlotte Mason. It is written in a poetic way with a lovely use of words and contains some very good advice for providing a successful learning experience for children, whether in school or at home.
Some points I have learned (not all necessarily new but a reminder anyway) are:
-Read the bible to my children everyday. No little sermons or Sunday school fluff, just the bible. And only a couple of verses or within the child's ability to sit still and listen. Sermons are not necessary aside from church when our lives are reflective of our Christianity.
-Read good books to my children that may seem to me above their level. Read quality chapter books to my preschooler and have her retell what she is getting from the story. This should only be for short periods a day, maybe 10 minutes. Just as long as she likes. And have her draw pictures if she likes of what she's getting from the book. She may not take from it what an older child will, but she will take something from it, and it will be her's. We shouldn't underestimate the abilities of our children to comprehend good books.
-Make lots of time for outdoor explorations.
-Treat my children as friends. They are "born persons", and we are equally under the same law of God. Teach that we both answer to God's law, and be an example. We both have things to learn from each other or together.
-Learning is not a race. Have high expectations, but at a level that is "appropriate to the individual who is progressing at his own rate of development".
-Let the child learn things for learning's sake or for "his own sake", not because of the expectations of others or in competition of others' abilities.
-Teach that we must do things that are right by God's law. We do not "merely boss the child about for our own convenience".
-"Law restrain[s] from evil, and love impell[s] toward good"
-Create an atmosphere of friendship, acceptance, security, and creativity where the child is comfortable with who she is and can flourish by sharing in worthwhile studies with people who like her "as a person".

I have already begun following some of the ideas introduced with my 3 year old daughter. The result? My daughter is understanding bible verses above what I ever believed she could. No fluff or coloring sheets, just raw bible. She gets it, and she's repeating the verses to me in appropriate circumstances! I have also begun reading the book "Black Beauty" to her. She likes it, and she understands it. Today when she asked to see a picture of the boy throwing sticks and rocks at the horses, I told her there was not a picture of this. So she decided we should draw our own illustration of this scene. We did so together, and I made a speech bubble for the master, in which she dictated what the master would say in our picture. I wrote in her words, "You're bad. I don't need you here. Go home, and be bad at your house!" Her dictation was a clear correct summary of what the master said in the book, which was, "You're a bad boy to chase the colts! But you won't get the chance to do it anymore. Take your pay and go home. I don't need you here." She clearly understands this classic, which is well above the level of what most 3 year old children are read. The reason we don't usually read these books to children is not because of their limited ability to comprehend but because of our underestimation of our children. I believe any child can prosper and benefit from being respected, challenged, and not having her abilities underestimated and undermined. I feel blessed to have read this book and plan to use the points I've learned in homeschooling my children.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
on June 1, 2007
This book is #1 for all parents of school and pre-school age children, especially if you are even remotely considering education options outside of the public school system. There are hundreds of books on the subject out there. Read this one first.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
     
 
Customers who viewed this also viewed

Consider This: Charlotte Mason and the Classical Tradition
Consider This: Charlotte Mason and the Classical Tradition by Karen Glass (Paperback - October 12, 2014)
$12.56

 
     

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.