Forbidden Planet 1956 G CC

Amazon Instant Video

(1,152) IMDb 7.7/10
Available in HD
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A dutiful robot named Robby speaks 188 languages. An underground lair provides astonishing evidence of a populace a million years more advanced than Earthlings.

Starring:
Walter Pidgeon, Anne Francis
Runtime:
1 hour 39 minutes

Available to watch on supported devices.

Forbidden Planet

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Forbidden Planet (Two-Disc 50th Anniversary Edition)

Price: $18.55

Includes the Amazon Instant Video 24 hour rental as a gift with purchase. Available to US Customers Only. See Details

Product Details

Genres Science Fiction, Adventure, Action, Kids & Family
Director Fred M. Wilcox
Starring Walter Pidgeon, Anne Francis
Supporting actors Leslie Nielsen, Warren Stevens, Jack Kelly, Richard Anderson, Earl Holliman, Robby the Robot, George Wallace, Robert Dix, Jimmy Thompson, James Drury, Harry Harvey Jr., Roger McGee, Peter Miller, Morgan Jones, Richard Grant, James Best, William Boyett, Frankie Darro
Studio Warner Bros.
MPAA rating G (General Audience)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Rental rights 24 hour viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Customer Reviews

As far as the movie goes, I liked it very much.
Tyson
This very modern looking and well-made film stikes an emotional cord in many viewers and on multiple levels.
Heather L. Parisi
Great special effects and a very interesting story line.
FRANKIE

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

317 of 344 people found the following review helpful By Bruce Aguilar on November 28, 2006
Format: DVD
Forbidden Planet is an incredible movie and no Sci-Fi fan should be without it. The transfer on the 50th Anniversary and Ultimate Collector's Editions is incredible. I've never seen the film look so bright, crisp and vibrant. The included documentaries and bonus footage are very entertaining and not to be missed.

A word of warning though, the Ultimate Collector's Edition is a bit of a rip off. The included Robby the Robot toy was the main reason I bought this set and it's much smaller (and less detailed) than the images lead you to believe. I haven't opened mine, but it looks like it's not even articulated. Definitely not worth the extra money I had to pay. The lobby card reporductions are nice, as is the tin case, but unless you plan to display these it's hard to justify the added cost.

Be smart, skip the Ultimate Collector's Edition and buy the 50th Anniversary Edition. You'll get just the exact same transfer and bonus material without the cheap toy and lobby cards.
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116 of 128 people found the following review helpful By Kenneth Keller on November 13, 2006
Format: DVD
There are now out *four* different versions of the 50th Anniversary edition of "Forbidden Planet": 2 standard (480i) DVD sets and 2 HD-DVD sets. Both formats are available as either a super-deluxe, Ultimate Collector's Edition set offered in a thick, green and red engraved hinged metal box, as well as a standard 2-disc sleeved set. Both come with lots extras, especially the metal Ultimate. I highly recommend them to everyone if you're so inclined toward lavish DVD sets. Being a longtime "Forbidden Planet" fan and collector, I'm planning on buying the other three variant sets, too, because, well, I'm obsessed with FP and by now have lost all sense of proportion when "collecting" this terrific film.

The Ultimate Collector's Edition metal box set is described on its' outer, partial card stock cover--and be careful when removing this as it's tricky and can be easily torn--as being made of a "unique metal alloy." (Hmm. Indestructible Krell metal perhaps???) Frankly, this deluxe set is everything I had hoped it would be, though I do have some quibble(see below). Overall, though, it's a beautiful package. One of the best super-deluxe DVD sets ever produced. It even includes a proper *gunmetal gray* 3.5" Robby (not black, as some supposed "film experts" have asserted for years) and a set of smallish FP lobby card reproductions in a printed sleeve. As an extra bonus for this release, you also get Robby's other 50s science fiction film "The Invisible Boy" and a set of smallish lobby card repros for it, too.

At last this science fiction masterpiece (classic just isn't good enough) has gotten the super-deluxe treatment--and complete digital restoration--it has long deserved. The digital picture and 5.1 sound are a marvel. FP has never looked or sounded this good--ever!
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250 of 286 people found the following review helpful By cookieman108 on June 14, 2004
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
It's funny, me being a fan of science fiction and movies in general, why it is that it took me so long to get around to watching Forbidden Planet (1956). Part of it is I feel as if I've already seen the film, as clips from it are usually always shown whenever someone does a documentary on science fiction in film, as it's just such an influential and amazing piece of work. Now, I've heard that this movie is loosely based on Shakespeare's play, The Tempest, but since I've never read it, I can't comment on comparisons between the play and the film. The film stars Walter Pidgeon, Anne Francis, Leslie Nielsen, and Robby the Robot (Yes, the robot gets a screen credit. If you look on the Internet Movie Database, you'll find it's even listed as an actor).

The story is about a spacecraft sent to learn what exactly happened to a previous spacecraft and its' crew, which had been deployed many years prior, and has since not been heard from in some time. This current mission is under the command of Commander John J. Adams (Nielsen), and soon find themselves on approach to the destination planet of the now lost ship. On their arrival, they get an ominous message, from the planet, issued by a member of the original crew, Dr. Edward Morbius (Pidgeon). Despite his warnings, they land and are soon met by a robot named Robby, who escorts them to Morbius' rather posh abode. Here we learn all the members of that fated crew have been killed off, except for Morbius and his daughter (whom Morbius had when he procreated with another member of the original crew), Altaira (Francis), by some unseen, yet completely nasty, force, to which Morbius and his daughter seem immune.
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85 of 97 people found the following review helpful By S. BARRY on November 14, 2006
Format: DVD
It saddens me to write this, as Warners did an awesome job at least in packaging this 50th Anniversary Edition of FORBIDDEN PLANET... it's what is included (and NOT included) that leads me to give this Special Edition only 3 stars at best. I hate to nit-pick, but considering that I and many others have waited since the original 1998 DVD release for a full-blown re-do from Warner Brothers, this new release leaves a lot to be desired.

First off: NO COMMENTARIES! At all! Historian Rudy Behlmer is on hand for the documentary, but no commentary??? Not even with Leslie Nielsen, Anne Francis, or any of the still-living actors seen in the "Amazing" documentary? How about one from at least all the modern-day special effects gurus who are also seen on the documentary? Simply unforgivable.

Second: The main documentary, "Amazing!" is a scant 25-30 minutes long! Haven't I been reading for months that this doc would be "feature-length?" Sorry folks... feature-length, to me, means AT LEAST 70 minutes long. Actors that you could have sworn had long passed, like Richard Anderson, Earl Holliman and Warren Stevens, are given scant face-time, and Anderson literally only gets about 10 seconds!!! This is "Oscar Goldman," for cryin' out loud! Oh sure, the modern-day directors, FX masters and writers fall all over themselves about the special effects and Robby the Robot, but where's the human element in all this? How did the principal actors all get involved in the film in the first place? What were their feelings during the production towards the material? Did they know it was good, or did they think it was cheesy? Did they all get along, or were all the male actors vying for the attention of Anne Francis? How was the director (Fred McLeod Wilcox) to work with...
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